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NOVEMBER 18, 2011 





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2 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 












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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 3 




PUBLISHER 

Nick Barbaro 


CONTENTS 


VOLUME 31, NUMBER 12 ★ NOVEMBER 18, 2011 



COVER PHOTO BY 
JANA BIRCHUM 


NEWS 

13 Tire Slasher 
Convicts 
Himself; Morton 
Prosecutor 
Wrote the Book 
on Crime; and 
More 

POINT AUSTIN 

BY AMY SMITH 

14 BESIDE THE 
POINT 

BY MICHAEL 
KING 


6 PAGE TWO 

BY LOUIS BLACK 

POSTMARKS 


22 DESIGNED TO 

FAIL As AISD 
contemplates 
repurposing 
Pearce Middle 
School - again 
- is the district 
promoting single- 
sex trends at the 
expense of cur- 
rent students? 

BY RICHARD 
WHITTAKER 


26 LETTERS AT 
3AM 

BY MICHAEL 
VENTURA 


ARTS 

29 Austin 

Playhouse’s 
New Home 
(Temporarily); 
Austin Creative 
Alliance’s 
New Director 
(Permanently); 
and All Over 
Creation 

30 EXHIBITIONISM 

360 (round 
dance), A Lie of 
the Mind, ‘West 
of East’ 

34 AFTER A 
FASHION 

BY STEPHEN 
MACMILLAN 
MOSER 

51 EAST AUSTIN 
STUDIO TOUR 

Previews of 
PechaKucha 
Night Austin #12 
and Eyes Got It! 
2011; Review of 
Domy’s ‘Monster 
Show 6,’ Five 
Favorite EAST 
Stops, and more 

BY ROBERT 
FAIRES AND 
WAYNE ALAN 
BRENNER 


FOOD 


SCREENS 


37 Beer Flights; 

Meal Times: 

Nov. 18-20; and 
Food-o-File 

38 SIPPING FROM 
THE SPIGOT, 
VOL 2 The 

second Great 
Boxed-Wine 
Challenge, plus 
a very important 
lesson 

BY WES 
MARSHALL 

40 RESTAURANT 
REVIEW Lavaca 
Teppan 


43 AFS Essential 

Cinema: The 
Comedies of 
Remarriage; the 
Association of 
Moving Image 
Archivists; and 
Snapshots from 
Wizard World 
2011 

44 GAME 
CHANGER 

How Austin’s 
indie gaming 
scene got cook- 
ing as Juegos 
Rancheros 

BY JAMES 
RENOVITCH 



Thanksgiving 
Feasts, p.40 


MUSIC 

47 ONE, TWO, 
TRES, CUATRO 

Lives well spent 
on the music 
spectrum 

BY MARGARET 
MOSER 

48 UME Lauren 
Larson looks 
tough, doesn’t 
she? 

BY DOUG 
FREEMAN 

50 TEXAS 
PLATTERS 

Charanga 
Cakewalk, Flesh 
Lights, Muchos 
Backflips!, etc. 


57 NEWS OF THE 
WEIRD 


CALENDAR 

56 THIS WEEK 

Final weekend for that 
East Austin Studio Tour: 
Go go gadget art 
explosion! 

THE ARTS 
GAY PLACE 

BY KATE X MESSER 

DAY TRIPS 

BY GERALD E. MCLEOD 

SPORTS UT Women’s 
Basketball 

SOCCER WATCH 

BY NICK BARBARO 


66 

FILM 

BACK 


Happy Feet Two, Into the Abyss, Melancholia, 
Immortals, Jack and Jill 

93 

SHOT IN THE DA 

THE LUV DOC 

68 

SHOWTIMES 


COMIX 

72 

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 


MR. SMARTY PANTS 

74 

MUSIC 

94 

CLASSIFIEDS 


RECOMMENDED The Jayhawks’ Gary 
Louris talks Recording 101, plus Gwar, 
Melt-Banana, Fu Manchu, Chuck Eddy, a 

102 

FREE WILL 
ASTROLOGY 


Nat Adderly birthday tribute, The Last Waltz 
revisited, Pete Anderson, Nathan Singleton, 
and much more 


78 VENUES 

80 ROADSHOWS + CLUB LISTINGS 




EDITOR 

Louis Black 


SENIOR EDITORS 

MANAGING EDITOR Cindy Widner FILM Marjorie Baumgarten 
ARTS Robert Faires MUSIC Raoul Hernandez 

NEWS Michael King NEWS MANAGING EDITOR Amy Smith 

FOOD Virginia B. Wood SCREENS, BOOKS Kimberley Jones 

SPECIAL ISSUES, GUIDES, INTERNS Kate Messer 

CALENDAR 

ARTS LISTINGS Wayne Alan Brenner COMMUNITY LISTINGS James Renovitch 

ASST. LISTINGS Anne Harris 

STAFF WRITERS 

Wells Dunbar, Margaret Moser, Marc Savlov, Jordan Smith, Richard Whittaker 

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS 

OFF THE RECORD Austin Powell DAY TRIPS Gerald E. McLeod 
FASHION Stephen MacMillan Moser MR. SMARTY PANTS R.U. Steinberg 
LETTERS AT 3AM Michael Ventura LITERA Ric Williams 

PRODUCTION 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Stout 
PRODUCTION MANAGER Chris Linnen 
WEB DIRECTOR Brian Barry 
ASST. WEBMASTER Michael Bartnett 

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Nathan Brown, Shelley Hiam, Carrie Lewis, Doug St. Ament 
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS John Anderson, Jana Birchum 

PROOFREADERS Mike Crissey, Mark Fagan, Monica Riese, Sarah Smith, Kristine Tofte 
INTERNS Zeke Barbaro, Cindy Brzostowski, Robert Cohen, Will Eidam, Sean Hargrove, 
Ramon Martinez, Lisa Montierth, Sara Reihani, Cristina Reyna, Meghan Ruth 
Speakerman, Katie Tomasino, Mark Wilson 

ADVERTISING 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Mark Bartel 

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jerald Corder, Carolyn Phillips, Lois Richwine 
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Jeff Carlyon, Heather Frankovis, Ali Garnel, Dora Lee Malouf, 
Elizabeth Nitz, Angela Specht 

RETAIL OPERATIONS MANAGER Tobi White 
ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Nathan Brown 
MARKETING DIRECTOR Erin Collier 
PROMOTIONS MANAGER Noel Marie Pitts 

CHRONTOURAGE Benjamin Dixon, Ashley Nicole Hardy, Sarah Mercer, Andrew Miller, 
Brett Rivera, Carly Roye, Ashley Sherwood, Rachel Staples, Ellen Wedgwood, John 
Williams; photographer: Matthew Wedgwood 

PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR/PERSONALS/CIRCULATION Dan Hardick 
CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR Cassidy Frazier 

SENIOR CLASSIFIEDS ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Brian Carr, Bobby Leath 

LEGAL NOTICES Jessica Nesbitt 

CLASSIFIEDS ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Whit Broders, Mike Harrell 

NATIONAL ADVERTISING Voice Media Group (888/278-9866, www.voicemediagroup.com) 

OFFICE STAFF 

CONTROLLER Liz Franklin 

SUBSCRIPTIONS Jessi Cape CREDIT MANAGER cindy soo 

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT Cassandra Pearce INFO CENTER Cory Plump 

SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR Rebecca Farr 

ASST. SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR Brandon Watkins 

SPECIAL EVENTS Elizabeth Derczo 

CIRCULATION 

Perry Drake, Tom Fairchild, Ruben Flores, Jonina Foel-Sommers, Brent Malkus, 

Eric McKinney, Grant Melcher, Paul Minor, Norm Reed, Dane Richardson, Eric 
Shuman, Zeb Sommers, Chris Volloy, Nicholas Wibbelsman, John Williamson, 

Bryan Zirkelbach 

CONTRIBUTORS 

Greg Beets, Rob Brezsny, Jim Caligiuri, Elizabeth Cobbe, Doug Freeman, Melanie Haupt, 

Sam Hurt, Wes Marshall, Tony Millionaire, Adam Roberts, Josh Rosenblatt, Chuck Shepherd, 
Jen Sorenson, Tom Tomorrow, Roy Tompkins, Jay Trachtenberg, Todd V. Wolfson 


The Austin Chronicle offers nonpaying internships. 
Contact Kate Messer at the intern hotline, 454-5765 x303. 


L?J VERIFIED 

• m AUDIT CIRCULATION 

The Austin Chronicle (ISSN: 1074-0740) is published by The Austin Chronicle 
Corporation weekly 52 times per year at 4000 N. 1-35, Austin, TX 78751. 
512/454-5766 ©2011 Austin Chronicle Corp. All rights reserved. 

Subscriptions: One year: $60 2nd class. Half-year: $35 2nd class. 
Periodicals Postage Paid at Austin, TX. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Austin Chronicle, PO Box 49066, 
Austin, TX 78765. 


Unsolicited submissions (including but not limited to articles, 
artwork, photographs, and resumes) are not returned. 


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4 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 5 



Fatty and Mabel 

The muses of a bright, fresh morning 


In the midst of this summer’s unending 
flood of sunlight, it was often too bright to 
breathe, much less see, as if one had woken in 
a crashing, ongoing river of sun rays sweep- 
ing away everything in front of its advance. 
Fatty and Mabel Adrift. 

The too-bright is rarely conducive to writ- 
ing except that when you are writing, what 
is in front of you is not necessarily there. 
Rainy days are always good for writing, as 
are the hours before dawn, but, again, that 
doesn’t matter - or maybe that does matter, 
just not as much when you are uncon- 
sciously twisting through your 
head settings, as thought- 
lessly as you flip through 
cable channels. Fatty and 
Mabel’s Simple Life. 

It’s a world loaded to 
the brim with things 
to comment on, but 
there are those non- 
thinking writers 
armed with automatic 
computer boards, typ- 
ing out mindless gibber- 
ish and cheap sloganeer- 
ing, as though if they put 
enough words into the air, it 
means they are saying something. 

I do tend to focus on and obsess about 
those anti-intellectual hobos who feel that 
pretending to a certain level of ignorance, 
which they actually believe is common 
sense, makes them in reality smarter than 
everyone else. 

There are also any number of Internet 
posters who diligently try to make sense of 
the world, reconciling their beliefs with the 
greater realties. Mabel and Fatty’s Wash Day. 

“Mabel” is Mabel Normand. She started 
in films when she was maybe 15 or 16 and 
had been an artists’ model for a couple of 
years already. Her deeply powerful good 
looks and limitless comedic talent soon 
found her a star in the world of two -reel 
silent comedies, featured in hundreds of 
films between 1910 and 1927. Mack Sennett, 
the driving force behind Keystone come- 
dies, was the great love of her life, as she 


was of his, but though they had a lengthy 
relationship, they never married. 

“Fatty” is Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle, one of 
the greatest of this country’s comedic actors. 
Although he weighed more than 300 pounds, 
he was graceful and athletic. A star by 1913, 
he made hundreds of short films until 
about 1920, when he began to concentrate 
on features. Arbuckle co-starred with 
Charlie Chaplin, and he gave Buster Keaton 
his break when they co-starred in a series of 
shoots beginning in 1917. Partying in a 

hotel suite while visiting San Francisco 
during a weekend late in 1921, he 
was accused of raping and kill- 
ing one of his guests. There 
were three trials. During the 
last one, the jury deliber- 
ated for five minutes 
before declaring him 
innocent of all charges. It 
didn’t matter; his career 
was over. Interestingly, 
this was not because of 
the courts or the media or 
the public. It was because 
the powers that be in the film 
industry of the time decided 
they couldn’t take a chance on him. 

It is a privilege to get to do this, to regu- 
larly write for you, to know some of you 
read it. The air often offers little storms of 
wires forgotten, grammar misused, or the 
short ends of spent emotional charges. I 
live deep in a hole in the center of my 
house. It is similar to my working place at 
the office, though the office is not nearly as 
dense. There are no limits to either of these 
spaces, no constrictions. Both provide me 
the ability to go wherever; the sometimes 
tsunami of books, CDs, DVDs, posters, mag- 
azines, etc., are not an ugly, jammed, unruly 
mess but rather a collection of doors. Doors 
to everywhere. 

Why Mabel Normand and Roscoe “Fatty” 
Arbuckle? I write this in the late, fresh 
morning. As I sat to write, I felt them so 
strongly with me that I knew I couldn’t shut 
them out. 

Mabel, Fatty and the Law. ■ 




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i c/31/11 


Postmarks 

THE OLDEST AND SADDEST 
JOKE IN AUSTIN 

Dear Editor, 

It’s the oldest joke in Austin: 

Q: What do you call an Austin musician who 
just broke up with his girlfriend? 

A: Homeless. 

As they say, funny because it’s true. But for 
a few decades now, there has been the one 
respite from that, the Wilson Street cottages 
[“Dead End for Wilson Street,” News, Nov. 
11]. And now that Ely Properties has finally 
lowered the boom and ordered everyone out in 
30 days, an entire troupe of Austin musicians 
is going through just such a breakup. Charlie 
Faye and her group are hoping to save at least 
a few of the cottages, but just where do you 
store entire buildings while looking for a per- 
manent spot for them? I’m thinking it’s time 
for a financial angel. 

So how about it, Richard Garriott? You’ve 
spent millions diving to the Titanic and orbiting 
the Earth. Got a few extra bucks to preserve 
some Austin history, maybe nurture another 
generation of musicians? Or how about you, 
John Paul DeJoria? I know you helped keep 
Antone’s afloat. Have a little extra hair-care 
money to invest? Hair bands just might make 
a comeback .... Or you there, at the top of the 
heap, Michael Dell! Think you might could ... 
uh ... umm ... uhhh .... Oh hell, nevermind. 
We’re screwed. 

Jim Vest 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR must be signed with 
full name and include daytime phone number, 
full address, or email address. Letters should 
be no longer than 300 words. 

We reserve the right to edit all submissions. 
Letters may not be edited, added to, or 
changed by sender once we receive them. 

General email address: mail@austinchronicle.com 

Postmarks forum: 

austinchronicle.com/forums/postmarks 

Mailing address: The Austin Chronicle, P0 Box 
49066, Austin, TX 78765 


^ Reader comment 

Reggie Watts on our review of his FFFF set: 

“I’m not sure about ‘rarely connecting to the 
crowd.’ From my point of view, people seemed 
to be responding favorably, but I will agree that 
the spoken bits were a little lackluster, and 
that was my fault. Sometimes I find it hard to 
choose an angle at a music test. Subtlety can 
be hard in tents. I do hope to be better next 
time I come through though! (Fingers crossed.) 

“RS. I would contend that there is no such 
thing as a hipster in this day and age. Only 
aesthetic bohemians. Let’s leave the hipsters 
in the 1950s where they belong!!:)” 

- ReggieWatts23 

“Fun Fun Fun Shots,” Music, Nov. 11 

austinchronicle.com/comments 

WILL DISTRICT SUPPORT 
NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS? 

Dear Editor, 

An Austin ISD brochure states, “AISD 
Teacher of the Year serves as an advisor to 
the superintendent during the next academic 
year.” I guess they weren’t talking about me. 
That brochure was published a year before I 
was named AISD Teacher of the Year. 

Though I am a teacher in East Austin, the dis- 
trict Teacher of the Year, and a resident of East 
Austin, I was never invited to have a conversa- 
tion with anyone in the superintendent’s office 
regarding the in-district charter school plan for 
the Eastside Memorial High School and all the 
schools that feed into it [“Not Everyone Keen 
on Charter IDEA,” News, Nov. 11]. 

Carstarphen’s proposed plan would allow 
charter school program IDEA from the Rio 
Grande Valley to come into East Austin and 
set up a school within the district. The IDEA 
program reports high levels of graduation and 
college completion. Sounds great, right? 

Well, only 100 students per grade level 
would be served. I can assure you there are 
more than 100 kids in each grade level on the 
Eastside who would like to go to college, who 
would like a high quality education, and who 
deserve it. 

continued on p.8 


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austinchronicle.com/postmarks 


Students would enter the IDEA school through 
a lottery. How can teachers and parents support 
a plan that will not benefit all students? 

Every East Austin teacher wants something bet- 
ter for her students. All of us want our kids to have 
the opportunity to go to college, not just the lucky 
100. A teacher doesn’t advocate for a chosen few. 
East Austin teachers advocate for all students. 

There will be students who never apply to enter 
into the IDEA school. Some will apply but won’t 
get picked. Some might spend just a year or two 
in East Austin, perhaps not really knowing about 
IDEA, before moving away to a different part of 
town. Who will educate these children? Who will 
push them toward college? Who will make sure 
that learning is meaningful despite unstable test 
scores and district pressure? 

I will. The teachers on the Eastside will. With 
this proposed plan, the future of the neighbor- 
hood schools is uncertain. We don’t know if the 
district will support us. We don’t know if funds 
and resources will be diverted away from neigh- 
borhood schools and into the IDEA school. 

We want something better for our kids, but 
we don’t want the consequences this plan will 
bring for a large group of kids and the neighbor- 
hood schools. 

Caroline Sweet 
AISD Teacher of the Year 
Fourth grade bilingual teacher at Metz 
Elementary 


THOUGHTS ON BAG BAN 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing in regard to the proposed plastic 
bag ban in the city of Austin. On the surface, I 


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8 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 
















really could care less either way, but I do have 
some thoughts and concerns. So today, with- 
out further ado, I am writing this short editorial 
about my thoughts on the proposed plastic 
bag ban. 

My wife and I do use cloth bags, but we do 
like to get a few plastic bags. At home we can 
use these bags in the small trash cans in the 
bathroom and bedrooms. 

The mayor’s proposed banning of them will not 
eliminate plastic bags. Sure maybe it might elim- 
inate plastic grocery bags, but not plastic bags. 
Such a ban (or a charge for use of such bags) 
would only force my wife and I to buy plastic 
trash sacks that we can’t afford - something we 
don’t have to do now because we can get them 
free when we shop. Thus because we would now 
be forced to buy trash bags, all the city has done 
is to trade one plastic bag for another and put a 
tighter strain on my family’s already strained bud- 
get, which means they have defeated their whole 
purpose in the first place. Way to go, mayor, for 
not thinking this thing through. 

Kevin Surbaugh 

THINK OF THE CHILDREN IT WILL BENEFIT! 

Dear Editor, 

Re: “Not Everyone Keen on Charter IDEA,” 
[News, Nov. 11]: Missing from the debate about 
turning over Eastside Memorial Vertical Team 
schools to IDEA Public Schools charters is the 
one thing we should be talking about - the chil- 
dren it will benefit. 

The Eastside schools in question are strug- 
gling and consistently receive unfavorable school 
accountability ratings. Despite the efforts of com- 
mitted adults at those schools, these schools 
just aren’t getting the job done for their stu- 
dents, who are predominantly low-income African- 
Americans or Hispanics. IDEA schools in the Rio 
Grande Valley have shown success in serving 
low-income Hispanic students in particular. 

Communications and collaboration between 
the district, the community, and families is criti- 
cal to any school’s success. Charter schools are 
not an answer in and of themselves, nor are 
they better than traditional schools in all cases. 
However, IDEA is a strong charter network that 

continued on p.10 




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engages parents and students alike. With its 
strong model and proven results, I believe a part- 
nership between AISD and IDEA would help these 
students receive a better education. I applaud 
Superintendent Meria Carstarphen for taking bold 
steps and being innovative to improve student 
achievement and school performance. That alone 
is reason enough for me to support this effort. 

I am a parent of public school kids and the execu- 
tive director of Stand for Children, an organization 
that is supportive of efforts like these to try some- 
thing new in schools where the status quo just isn’t 
working for kids - lo mismo, no sirvel Our kids can no 
longer be satisfied with incremental improvements 
to their education. I encourage you to speak up and 
get involved if you feel strongly about this issue. 

Jerel Booker 
Stand for Children 
Texas executive director 

[Editor’s note: Stand for Children is a national 
nonprofit advocacy operation , based out of Oregon 
and Massachusetts , with nine state affiliates. 
Before joining the organization , Booker was asso- 
ciate commissioner for Educator and Student 
Policy Initiatives for the Texas Education Agency. ] 

PAUL THE ONLY PRO-PEACE CANDIDATE 

Dear Editor, 

I remember when the president declared that 
Saddam Hussein had 2,000 gallons of anthrax, 



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5,000 gallons of botulinum, and an ongoing 
nuclear weapons program. He asked Congress 
to pass a bill making "regime change” in Iraq 
a national priority. He also wanted to spend 
$97 million to begin sending war material to 
Iraq. The Senate voted unanimously to pass 
the bill. Representative Ron Paul was the only 
member of the House who stood up to argue 
against the bill. Bill Clinton’s Iraq Liberation 
Act passed in October 1998. Two months later 
Clinton ordered the cruise missile bombing of 
Baghdad. Four years later President Bush cited 
the Iraq Liberation Act in his request for autho- 
rization to send in troops. Sen. Hillary Clinton 
supported Bush’s expansion of Bill Clinton’s 
undeclared war. 

Recently I heard the Republican presidential 
candidates asserting their readiness to make 


war on Iran - except Ron Paul, who disavowed 
any intention of starting any wars. Shortly after 
the debate ended, President Obama made a 
statement that “everything is still on the table” 
if and when he decides to make war on Iran. 
(That means that he will nuke Iran if he feels it is 
necessary.) His chosen secretary of state, Hillary 
Clinton, is doing everything possible to ignite a 
war with Iran. 

Are Democrats going to re-elect a known 
warmonger? Can the Chronicle say anything nice 
about the only pro-peace candidate? Ron Paul 
is also the only candidate who opposes torture, 
bailouts, NAFTA, debts, corporatism, and the war 
on drugs. 

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PERRY RESIGN! 

Dear Editor, 

Texas has elected some truly embarrassing 
governors, but never before has Texas been so 
embarrassed and humiliated as it has with Rick 
Perry as governor, let alone regarding Perry’s 
nuclear meltdown - his so-called presidential 
campaign. Perry should quit the campaign trail, 
return to Texas, resign as governor, and head 
back home to Haskell and the “African-American 
head” hunting ranch. Immediately if not sooner. 
Perry: Resignl 

Sincerely 
Thom Prentice 

THANKS FOR SAVING DR. PUGGLES 

Dear Editor, 

I am writing to share a quick story and com- 
mend a fellow citizen. On Saturday, Nov. 12, I 
walked my pug down to the Spyglass TacoDeli. I go 
there often because the tacos rock and the patio 
is pet-friendly. Things took a surprising turn when 
my dog was attacked by another dog there. He 
latched onto Doc’s neck and would not let go. The 
owner managed to pin his dog down, but we could 
not get him to let go. One of the servers, Patrick, 
jumped right in the middle and gave orders to 
the owner while hitting the dog in the head. After 
a horrible few moments, the dog did release his 
grip. My dog and I were shaken, but the vet said 
no permanent damage was done. I just wanted to 
publicly express my gratitude to this man Patrick. 
He certainly did not have to throw himself into a 
dog fight, especially since he and I were strang- 
ers. But he did, and I am very thankful. It’s beauti- 


ful to see people do the best thing in a situation 
and help out. I am truly grateful. 

Regards , 

Kim Dowd and Dr. Puggles 

+ Reader comment 

Regarding the review of Ghosts: 

“This review says, ‘Ibsen’s use of syphilis as 
a plot point is a bit amusing if taken literally, but 
put into context, even mentioning the disease 
was a shock to his audiences, and the ramifica- 
tions for the characters are profound.’ 

“Ibsen’s objective was neither to amuse nor 
to shock, but to make a point. His play A Doll’s 
House was nearly universally excoriated because 
its heroine chose to leave her husband. He wrote 
Ghosts to say, ‘OK: I’ll show you what happens 
when a woman should have left her husband, but 
didn’t.’ It was his reply and rebuttal to the critics 
who’d said he was immoral for showing a wife 
who left a marriage. 

"(Needless to say, Ghosts got even more criticism 
than A Doll’s House, leading Ibsen to write the third 
play in the sequence, An Enemy of the People, about 
a man who is condemned by an entire town for tell- 
ing an unpleasant truth.)” - gym nos 

“ Arts Review,” The Arts, Oct. 28 

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12 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 








21 THE HIGHTOWER REPORT 22 DESIGNED TO FAIL 



Austin’s new animal center officially opened Nov. 12 after the ceremonial ribbon cutting by Mayor Lee Leffingwell, flanked by Council Members Laura Morrison 
and Mike Martinez; former Council Member Betty Dunkerley, for whom the new campus is named, holds a piece of the ribbon (far right). 

Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


Headlines 

> It rained Tuesday! Hallelujah! 

City Council takes a break from official meetings 
until Dec. 8 (with a work session Dec. 6), when 
the various amendments of the Downtown 
Austin Plan are expected to return. For more, 
see “Beside the Point,” p.14. 

While council rests, the 2012 Charter Revision 
Committee will be busy today, with members 
discuss various proposals for single-member dis- 
tricts at the Austin Community College Pinnacle 
Campus (Nov. 17, 6:30pm). The committee’s 
next meeting will be Thursday, Dec. 1, 6pm, at 
the Carver Branch Library; you can also weigh in 
online at www.austintexas.gov/charter/involved.htm. 

> City campaign season officially began Nov. 14 
(first fundraising day for the May election), and 
the lines are beginning to form. Mayor Lee 
Leffingwell announced for re-election Wednes- 
day, and on Thursday (today), Council Member Bill 
Spelman will officially declare he won’t challenge 
Leffingwell but will run for re-election to his Place 
5 seat. Place 6 Council Member Sheryl Cole told 
us she anticipates making a decision “relatively 
soon” whether to run for mayor or stick with her 
council race. Place 4’s Laura Morrison, who is 
not up for re-election, said, “Several people have 
encouraged me to run [for mayor], but I’m happy 
where I am, and I plan to enjoy this term.” Place 2 
council member and social-media maven Mike 
Martinez announced via Facebook that he will 
formally announce for re-election today (Thursday). 

On Tuesday, families in Austin ISD’s Eastside Mem- 
orial Vertical Team gathered at Brooke Elementary 
to discuss the district’s proposal to hand their cam- 
puses over to the IDEA Public Schools charter 
group, the South Texas nonprofit credited with 
improving public schools there. On Wednesday, the 
Statesman reported on a Penn State study (disput- 
ed by IDEA and AISD) reflecting that the charter’s 
results are not as positive as claimed. 


Suburban Nightmare 

One neighborhood’s battle against a church amphitheatre 


OCL ^ 

/k 


When it comes to neighborhood develop- 
ment issues, there are two diametrically 
opposed camps: those who believe neigh- 
borhood associations hold too much “no- 
growth” sway at City Hall, and those who 
believe the local real estate 
machine is exceptionally good 
at driving that message. 

Indeed, NAs are blamed 
for everything from sub- 
urban sprawl to Austin’s 
high cost of living. Keep 
in mind, though, that 
many developers actu- 
ally prefer building in 
the suburbs - so much 
so that even the subur- 
ban neighborhoods have 
started to organize in oppo- 
sition to some developments. 

In the rolling hills of Southwest 
Austin, which has grown faster than 
any other area of the city, residents are get- 
ting their first glimpse of Austin’s develop- 
ment review process - and they’re not lik- 
ing what they see. Most of these folks would 
hardly qualify as no-growthers; like every- 
one else, they’re just trying to maintain 
their quality of life. That’s not an unreason- 


BY AMY 


tn( 


t’OIN'f 

AUSTIN, 


SMITH 


able goal, considering Austin’s quality of 
life is one of the chief selling points of the 
Austin Chamber of Commerce. 

No Public Forum 

The latest but certainly not 
the last example of a suburban 
neighborhood trying to 
tame encroaching growth 
pertains to the planned 
$25 million campus of 
PromiseLand West 
Church, in an area 
along Highway 71 
zoned for rural residen- 
tial development. There 
are three subdivisions 
surrounding the planned 
campus, and none of them 
opposes the project, with the 
exception of one key feature: a 
1,500-seat outdoor amphitheatre. 

The amphitheatre continues to be the 
most contentious piece of the PromiseLand 
plan. It’s an emotional sore point because 
the neighborhoods challenging the outdoor 
venue - most specifically the Hill Country 
Estates Homeowners Association - never 
had an opportunity to air their concerns in 




a public forum. They were dealt their first 
major blow earlier this year when a 2008 
city email surfaced that effectively “hijacked 
and ramrodded the case,” as one neighbor 
put it. The second blow was delivered last 
month, with the city rejecting the HOA’s 
administrative appeal. 

It’s not entirely clear how the email 
appeared out of the blue, but its author, 
Greg Guernsey, director of the city’s Plan- 
ning and Development Review Department, 
is sticking by its content. His email, dated 
Dec. 23, 2008, was a response to the church’s 
previous engineering firm, which had laid 
out the church’s plans in a letter and asked 
for his administrative approval. In reply, 
Guernsey granted the request and wished 
the engineer happy holidays. Because 
churches have the luxury of leeway in devel- 
opment matters, Guernsey’s approval was 
entirely legal. But how many church devel- 

continued on p.14 


Also in AISD news, the district hosts a communi- 
ty meeting on single-sex schools Saturday, 
lOam-noon, at the LBJ High School cafeteria. At 
their Nov. 21 meeting, the trustees are sched- 
uled to vote on the proposed Facility Master Plan 
“framework” that could include either or both of 
these options. 

As the national Occupy movement reaches its 
two-month mark, a concerted attempt by several 
big-city mayors to use armed police to clear the 
protestors has mostly backfired, giving the popu- 
lar protests new energy - just in time for an 
international day of protest today, Nov. 17. 

> More dismal polling news for Gov. Rick Perry, 
who this week announced that he intends to 
make the federal government more like that of 
Texas - infrequent and ineffective. The latest 
Gallup poll shows a zero “Positive Intensity 
Score” - meaning an equal number of Republic- 
ans have a strongly unfavorable opinion of him 
as have a strongly favorable view. Pundits now 
place him fifth in a four-horse race (see “Perry’s 
Poll Dance,” p.20) and fading fast. On the posi- 
tive side, he’s becoming a regular comedy fea- 
ture of late-night TV. 


I will not allow taxpayer dollars 
to be placed at risk” 

- Texas Comptroller Susan Combs, 
on the precarious status of the 
Austin Formula One race and its 
$25 million annual state subsidy, 
as promoters and backers feuded, 
legal questions mounted, and track 
construction was halted indefinitely 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 13 





POINT AUSTIN continued from p.13 


opments include 1,500-seat outdoor venues 
opposed by neighboring subdivisions? 

Nearly two years passed before the 
church submitted its development applica- 
tion - through another engineer that was 
representing the church, Hanrahan Pritch- 
ard Engineering Inc. In January of this 
year, city staffer Sarah Graham was put in 
charge of the church’s development appli- 
cation. Judging by city documents, Graham 
was most concerned about the amphithe- 
atre. She set to work pursuing the ques- 
tion of whether the facility was being built 
for “religious assembly” or for “outdoor 
entertainment,” which would require fur- 
ther review by the Planning Commission. 

According to city records, Graham 
received an internal memo in February, 
alerting her that Guernsey had already 
signed off on the amphitheatre in 2008. 
The heads-up about the email could have 
been interpreted as a warning to back off, 
but Graham continued to question the 
amphitheatre’s purpose to make sure 
everything was up to snuff. Meanwhile, 
surrounding neighborhoods were growing 
increasingly concerned as the pastor of the 
church, Randy Phillips, continued to tout 
the outdoor facility as a multipurpose, 
state-of-the-art amphitheatre that would 
provide a venue for everything from jazz 
concerts to high school graduations to 
family movie nights. It was, as Phillips 
described it, the most significant piece of 
his “Dream City.” (See “‘Dream City’ or 
Neighborhood Threat?,” March 25.) 

The Smoking Memo 

Contacted this week, Graham declined 
to comment on the case. Guernsey said he 
made his determination based on what is 
and isn’t allowed for churches in the city’s 
land use code, and that a restrictive cove- 
nant agreement, signed last month, takes 
into consideration some of the neighbor- 
hood’s concerns. As such, the amphithe- 


atre would be limited to use for “worship 
services, weddings, funerals, and educa- 
tional and musical presentations,” as well 
as for “non-religious non-profit civic uses 
such as neighborhood meetings” and 
school graduations. No for-profit events 
can be held at the site, unless the proceeds 
benefit a nonprofit or other worthy cause. 

As one neighborhood resident put it, Gra- 
ham, the case manager, “got hit between the 
eyes” with Guernsey’s 2008 email, effective- 
ly washing away her months of work on the 
case. “I felt like she was doing a real good 
job,” said Kim Butler of the Hill Country 
Estates Homeowners Association. “It was 
very frustrating because the neighborhoods 
had done their work,” he said, in years of 
neighborhood meetings and correspondence 
with the city. “Why Director Guernsey chose 
to offer an opinion at all, when no one on his 
staff would do so during the formal site plan 
review process, is THE question in this case 
for the neighborhoods,” Butler wrote in a 
follow-up to a phone conversation. 

PromiseLand has long insisted that 
many of its members live in the surround- 
ing subdivisions and support the plan. On 
Tuesday, I asked a church official for the 
name of someone who would back up that 
claim. A few minutes later, Noemi Contrer- 
as called to express her support for the 
development, along with the amphithe- 
atre, and said she and her husband intend 
to meet with other residents. She said she 
wasn’t aware that the opposing residents 
had been completely shut out of the city 
review process. “They should have an 
opportunity to speak up, to have an oppor- 
tunity to say what’s on their mind.” 

Meanwhile, Butler and other residents 
are arranging meetings with City Council 
members and the mayor. Before long, they 
and other southwest neighborhood groups 
should know their way around City Hall, 
perhaps well enough to carry some “no- 
growth” sway. ■ 


CIVICS 101 


THURSDAY 

HERITAGE TREES The Environ- 
mental Board Development Com- 
mittee discusses heritage trees 
and development scenarios. 

2pm. City Hall , 301 W. Second. 

RALLY AT ZILKER SCHOOL to 

show solidarity with the Occupy 
movement’s national day of 
action. 2:15pm. Zilker 
Elementary 1900 Bluebonnet. 
RE-FUND EDUCATION The day 
of action continues with Educa- 
tion Austin reps and students of 
all levels teaming up to demand 
that the Legislature give educa- 
tion the funding it deserves. 

6pm. South steps , Texas Capitol. 

1-35 IMPROVEMENTS are slat 
ed from U.S. 290 East to 
William Cannon. Help define 
“affordable and effective 
improvements.” 3-8pm. Austin 
Energy Building , Town Lake 
Center ; 721 Barton Springs Rd. 


CHARTER REVISION COMMIT- 
TEE meets to consider and pos- 
sibly take action on single-mem- 
ber districts and campaign 
finance recommendations. 

6pm. ACC Pinnacle Campus , 

7748 Hwy. 290 W. 

GREEN PARTY MEETING on 

2012 elections and support for 
Occupy Austin. 6:30-8:30pm. 
Carver Branch Library , 

1161 Angelina. 

SATURDAY 

COMMUNITY MEETING ON 
SINGLE-SEX SCHOOLS is part 
of the district’s ongoing Facilities 
Master Plan community engage- 
ment process. lOam-noon. 

LBJ High School cafeteria , 

7309 Lazy Creek. 

AUSTIN UNCHAINED Shop 
locally to keep your money in the 
local economy. Find more info at 
stores in the city’s eight I BIZ dis- 
tricts and at www.ibuyaustin.com. 


SUN DAY 2 

PINBALLS AND PUPPIES 

Engage your pinball wizardry at 
this benefit for the Austin 
Humane Society. 2:30pm. 
Pinballz Arcade, 8940 Research 
Blvd. #100. 

MONDAY 

AUSTIN ISD BOARD MEETING 

with the board scheduled to 
vote on the Facility Master Plan 
framework. 7pm. Carruth Admin. 
Center, 1111 W. Sixth. 

TUESDAY 

FEED THE HOMELESS Mobile 
Loaves & Fishes joins Jack 
Allen’s Kitchen to serve meals 
to Austin’s homeless. 5pm. First 
Baptist Church, 901 Trinity. 

FEAST OF SHARING H-E-B 
hosts its 22nd annual food-shar- 
ing fest. 4-8pm. Palmer Events 
Center, 900 Barton Springs Rd. 


We Love Us! 

JUST ASK ANYBODY - AUSTINITES APPROVE OF AUSTIN 




As anyone who’s attended a local film festi- 
val can tell you, Austinites cheer at any cine- 
matic acknowledgment of our existence. 

Turns out we also tell telephone surveyors 
just how splendiferous it is to live here, in the 
vein of the annual revivals of Greater Tuna. 

At least, that was the message delivered 
Nov. 10 to City Council in the form of 2011 
community survey findings presented by 
Kansas-based consultants ETC Institute. 
According to COO Chris Tatham, ETC’s annu- 
al survey (which the company also performed 
the last two years) found that among 13 cit- 
ies with populations larger than 500,000 
(among them Dallas, Fort Worth, San 
Francisco, and New York) Austin ranks 
No. 1 in citizen satisfaction, with a 
bullet - the ratings are trending 
better over the past three 
years. Tatham was intro- 
duced by Budget Officer Ed 
Van Eenoo, who called 
attention to Austinites’ 
praise for the city’s quali- 
ty of life and the delivery 
of city services. “So when 
we talk about things like 
Austin being the most liv- 
able city in the nation, or the 
best-managed city in the 
nation,” Van Eenoo said, “those 
words are not just bravado.” 

The survey of 1,339 residents across the 
city (a “good representation by age, income, 
race/ethnicity”) reflects that residents “gener- 
ally have a positive perception” of the city; 
satisfaction is “generally the same through- 
out the city” and overall “higher than the 
national average.” That response to city ser- 
vices has mostly improved over the last three 
years, during a period of budget cutbacks. In 
detail, the survey reflects the highest satis- 
faction with the airport (88% either satisfied 
or very satisfied) and public safety (80%), and 
the lowest with street and sidewalks (48%) 
and planning/ permitting (40%). In all, Van 
Eenoo noted, the survey reflects a public 
“satisfied or very satisfied” (69%) with the 
“customer service” it gets from the city, “a 
whopping 26% above national norms” - as 
Tatham echoed in his headline finding: the 
“overall satisfaction rating” for Austin is 65%, 
vs. an average of 42% for those other 12 mis- 
erable urban wastelands. 

Ain’t we grand? (For the record, those posi- 
tive findings were not reflected in the content 
of Thursday’s Citizens Communication.) 

While welcoming the survey’s results, coun- 
cil members expressed skepticism about how 
thoroughly it reflects the overall conditions of 
life in Austin, with Mike Martinez noting that 
it doesn’t address social justice issues like 
poverty or health care, to which staff replied 
that they use “other metrics” - such as the 
Community Action Network’s “dashboard 
survey” of local conditions - for those broad- 
er standards. City Manager Marc Ott took 
the opportunity to congratulate city staff on 
its excellent “report card.” 


BY MICHAEL 


Va 


Reside thi! 

i POINT , 


The other big briefing of the day was on the 
Austin Resource Recovery Master Plan, 

delivered by ARR Director Bob Gedert, who 
emphasized the department’s drive toward 
“zero waste” by 2040 (currently 38% is divert- 
ed) through four “keystone initiatives”: materi- 
als management, expanded recycling, organ- 
ics collection and composting, and economic 
development (e.g., remarketing). One major 
factoid: The city services only 25% of the 
city’s overall “resource” stream - meaning 
larger progress depends on influencing the 
commercial contractors who handle the other 
75%. A minor controversy concerns whether 
the city should partner with InSinkErator for 
potential disposal projects involving 

apartment complexes; despite the 
department’s official skepticism 
(see “City Chews on Food 
Scraps,” Nov. 4), Gedert 
deferred to Bill Spelman’s 
encouragement that the 
city “pilot” a project. 


MEANWHILE . 


KING 




Some of the most hotly 
contested issues arose 
almost offstage. This was 
the meeting designated for 
a contract between the city 
and Austin Pets Alive! for inter- 
im operation of the Town Lake 
Animal Shelter (as an adoption site) as the 
shelter moved to its new Levander Loop loca- 
tion on Saturday. That didn’t quite happen; 
but at press time Wednesday, a deal was 
expected soon. 

Also delayed was the much-anticipated sec- 
ond and third readings of the Downtown 
Austin Plan, with or without the controversial 
Central Urban Redevelopment zoning. 

Although folks packed the house at 10am 
over the much-debated question of who 
should run the new boathouse on Lady Bird 
Lake - the nonprofit Austin Rowing Club or 
the for-profit Texas Rowing Center - the 
matter was delayed until nearly 9pm. 

Council’s decision was an anticlimax, since 
TRC had been disqualified for a violation of 
the no-lobby rule, but the ARC folks still laid 
out their case at length (with a brief rebuttal 
from TRC), and council (after a confounding 
suggestion by Kathie Tovo that the more 
subcontractors, the merrier) voted unani- 
mously that staff negotiate the ARC contract. 

If nothing else, the rowers confirmed their 
redoubtable stamina. 

Finally, approved on first reading - pending 
further adjustments - were the zoning amend- 
ments for the Grand Hotel at Waller Creek 

(Red River & Cesar Chavez), the next expect- 
ed addition to Downtown’s accumulating 
Convention Center hotels. 

Council is off until Dec. 8 (with a Dec. 6 
work session), when the hotel and the Down- 
town Austin Plan are expected to return. ■ 

Barring an unanticipated honeymoon injury, City 
Hall Hustle will return to this space next week. 
Meanwhile , follow @PointAustin on Twitter. 


14 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 









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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 15 















Morton Prosecutor Wrote 
the Book on Crime 



According to Williamson County 277th 
District Court Judge Ken Anderson, who 
prior to 2002 spent 16y2 years as district 
attorney, having the “right people” working 
in law enforcement - police and prosecutors 
- is crucial. “We all have a stake in having 
the right people in these jobs,” Anderson 
wrote in his 1997 book, Crime in Texas: Your 
Complete Guide to the Criminal Justice 
System. He also wrote: “Our government’s 
first obligation is the protection of its citi- 
zens. As a society, we don’t need to accept 
locked doors, burglar alarms, and fear as 
inevitable. We need to demand from our 
legislators, judges, prosecutors, and law 
enforcement officials a system that first and 
foremost keeps us safe.” 

At issue now is whether Anderson has 
lived up to his words - most specifically, 
whether he was the “right” person to serve 
as district attorney and prosecutor of 
Michael Morton, who was recently released 
from prison after DNA test- 
ing demonstrated that he 
was not responsible for 
murdering his wife, 

Christine, in Georgetown in 

1986. Anderson may have 
played a lead role in not only 
violating the public trust 
but also in making Central 
Texas a more dangerous 
place by deliberately hiding 
evidence from Morton’s 
defense. The evidence could 
have demonstrated 25 years 
ago that someone else was 
responsible for Christine’s 
murder - and likely respon- 
sible for at least one other 
murder, that of Austin moth- 
er Debra Masters Baker, 
who was killed in her home 
a year and a half after the 
Morton murder. 

That Michael Morton did 
not kill his wife is certain. 

Prosecuted by Anderson and 
sentenced to life in prison in 

1987, Morton was finally 
freed last month and declared 
innocent by the courts. After 
years of refusal by Anderson’s 
successor, D.A. John Bradley, 
to allow DNA testing on a bloody bandana 
found right after the murder near the Mor- 
ton home where Christine was bludgeoned 
to death in her bed, the tests, finally court- 
ordered, revealed her DNA mingled with 
that of a then-unknown male. 

That man, 5 7 -year- old Mark Alan Nor- 
wood, was arrested in Bastrop on Nov. 9 and 
has been charged with the capital murder of 
Christine Morton. Additional analysis has 
also matched Norwood’s DNA profile to a 
hair found at the Baker crime scene, where 
the young mother was found bludgeoned to 


death in 1988 in her North Austin home. 
Norwood had moved to Austin’s Crestview 
neighborhood in 1985, just blocks from the 
Baker home. 

How it happened that police and prosecu- 
tors focused so exclusively on Morton for 
his wife’s murder is the subject of an ongo- 
ing investigation under the oversight of 
Judge Sid Harle. So far, lawyers for Morton 
have deposed three key witnesses: Ander- 
son; his second chair for the prosecution, 
Mike Davis (now a defense attorney); and 
former Williamson County Sheriff’s Sgt. 
Don Wood, lead investigator on the Morton 
murder. Copies of the Anderson and Wood 
depositions have not been publicly released, 
but according to a transcript of the Davis 
deposition, it appears Anderson played a 
key role in driving the investigation toward 
Morton. He was perhaps also responsible 
for failing to release to Morton’s defense 
key pieces of information that would have 
cast serious doubt on the 
state’s case. 

Among that evidence is a 
transcript of a conversation 
between Morton’s son Eric 
and his grandmother that 
occurred 11 days after the 
murder. According to Eric, 
then 3 years old, his father 
was not home when the 
“monster” killed his mother. 
He recounted key details, 
including that the man - “a 
monster with a big mous- 
tache,” as his grandmother, 
Rita Kirkpatrick, told Wood 
- had used a piece of wood to 
bludgeon Christine and that 
he threw a blue suitcase on 
her body. His father, Eric 
told Kirkpatrick, was not 
home at the time of the 
crime. Moreover, a check 
sent to Christine by a rela- 
tive was cashed days after 
the murder, endorsed by 
someone other than 
Christine, and just two days 
after the murder, someone in 
San Antonio reported that a 
woman had tried to use 
Morton’s credit card. 

Davis told Gerald Goldstein, one of 
Morton’s lawyers, that he wasn’t aware of 
any of those details - and that he was trou- 
bled to learn only recently that the evidence 
existed before Morton was tried. It appears 
that the transcript (according to a notation 
at the bottom) was provided to the D.A. by 
Wood, and Davis said he believes Anderson 
had “an affirmative duty” to release the 
exculpatory information to Morton’s 
defense. Davis also described Anderson as a 
man who tightly controlled every aspect of 
the Morton prosecution. 


It’s not surprising then that Anderson, in 
Crime in Texas, writes that the theory of the 
Morton crime was his: “The defendant and 
his wife had celebrated his birthday the 
night before at the City Grill,” he wrote. “My 
theory of the crime was that after returning 
home, he wanted to have sex. When she 
said no, he savagely beat her to death.” The 
“critical” proof of that, he writes, is that 
food was found in her stomach that matched 
food the couple had eaten the night before 
(that is, not yet digested at the time of her 
death). That was enough for Anderson - 
regardless of other evidence pointing 
toward someone from outside the home. 

In his deposition, Davis said he went to 
Anderson’s office recently, after learning 
about Eric’s statements, to ask if the infor- 
mation had been turned over to Morton’s 
team in 1987. “And so I went to Judge 
Anderson’s office and asked him, ‘Were you 
aware of that?”’ Davis recalled. “And he 
says, ‘We turned it over.’” 

“That’s what you were concerned about. 
That’s what you were asking him about,” 
Goldstein replied. 

“Yeah, because that would just be horri- 
ble if that didn’t happen.” 

Under further questioning, Davis said 
Anderson either “implied or he stated” that 
the information was turned over. Goldstein 
asked him which it was. “The first thing 
[Anderson] said was, ‘Did you try this case 
with me?”’ Davis responded. “So he didn’t 


even remember at that time. The second 
thing was, ‘Well, I’ll just blame it all on you.’ 
But he laughed when he said that, so I hope 
that wasn’t correct.” 

“Do you have any confidence that he 
won’t?” Goldstein asked. 

“I don’t know,” Davis responded. “I - no, 
I don’t know.” 

Whether Anderson deliberately failed to 
turn over the evidence is now also the sub- 
ject of a Texas Bar investigation. Intentional 
or not, the failure to follow the obvious 
leads in the case has had serious impact. 
Not only did Morton spend 25 years behind 
bars, but at least one other person, Baker, 
lost her life in a crime that possibly could 
have been avoided. At first Austin police 
focused on Baker’s husband, but after they 
cleared him, the case went cold. Now with 
the new DNA evidence link to Norwood, the 
investigation has been reinvigorated; an 
official Austin Police Department statement 
says the department is aware of the Norwood 
arrest and is “committed to a thorough 
investigation” of the Baker murder. 

Norwood has lived in at least three states 
besides Texas and trails a rap sheet behind 
him from each - including counts of drug 
possession, aggravated assault, and arson, 
reported YNN. Whether he has also left a 
trail that links him to any other unsolved 
murders is unclear. 

- Jordan Smith 



16 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



■ M 4 VJ .1 


Formula One on the Brink? 

Work Stopped while Fl Factions Feud 


Austin’s inaugural Formula One race - 
officially scheduled to take place next fall - 
may be in peril, as construction on the new 
Circuit of the Americas track near Elroy 
has been suspended. Sources close to the 
matter say that the planning has become a 
game of brinkmanship between the two firms 
at the heart of the project. 

While outsiders see a single track in devel- 
opment, there are actually two companies 
involved in the overall project. On one side is 
Full Throttle Productions LP, under former 
race car driver and project creator Tavo 
Hellmund. On the other is the Circuit of the 
Americas itself, headed up by chief investors 
Bobby Epstein and Red McCombs. Full 
Throttle effectively holds the contracts for the 
race, while COTA owns the track. The two 
had publicly worked hand in hand, but now 
they seem divided over finances. On Nov. 15, 
Epstein announced that construction has 
halted until COTA has the Fl contract signed, 
sealed, and delivered. With millions already 
sunk into the project and three international 
race series - Fl, MotoGF? and V8 Supercars 
- scheduled for the track, Epstein said, “We 
have spent tremendous resources preparing 
for the [races], but the failure to deliver race 
contracts gives us great concern.” Full Throt- 
tle fired back that it and the city had done 
everything possible to start the project and 
that “it is the responsibility of Circuit of the 
Americas to bring it across the finish line.” 


Rumors have circulated for much of the 
summer about tension at the track site in 
southeast Travis County, especially after the 
announcement of another Grand Prix race in 
the U.S. - to be held in the New York City 
area, and without any government funding. 
The first real public sign of trouble came in 
early November, when the city of Austin 
announced that it was temporarily suspend- 
ing discussions about annexing the facility 
area, currently in the city’s extraterritorial 
jurisdiction. Then, at last weekend’s Abu 
Dhabi Grand Prix, Formula One CEO Bernie 
Ecclestone reportedly said the first Austin 
race may not happen in 2012 because the 
two sides have “forgotten to talk to each 
other.” Initially, that statement was being 
interpreted by local insiders as the sport’s 
head honcho putting the screws to Epstein 
on behalf of his old friend Hellmund. 

However, on Nov. 16, Ecclestone was report- 
ed as saying that the current deal with 
Hellmund is off, meaning a new deal would 
have to be struck with the circuit; COTA was 
contacted but declined to comment. 

The current dispute reduces the conflict to 
a fight that is increasingly about private 
cash. Beyond a commitment to reimburse 
the developers for building water utilities out 
to the area, the city has no financial commit- 
ment to the track. On Nov. 15, Comptroller 
Susan Combs made a public statement that 
her office will “continue to monitor” the situ- 


Hancock Not Up to PAR(D) 

The Parks and Recreation Department 

on Tuesday evening kicked off its Community 
Engagement Process regarding the future of 
Hancock Golf Course by calling a meeting 
with representatives from several adjacent neighbor- 
hood associations. 

The course is caught in a vicious circle, as 
PARD’s Kevin Gomillion laid it out. The number 
of rounds played at the golf course has continued 
to drop drastically over the past decade, as course 
conditions have continued to deteriorate, because 
maintenance hasn’t been funded, because revenues 
are dropping, because ... well, you get the idea. In 
economic terms - and PARD staff stressed that the 
municipal golf courses are an enterprise fund, not 
part of the General Fund - this is an underperform- 
ing golf course, and it isn’t going to be profitable 
even with significant investment. 

Staff presented four options: 

• Continue to operate the golf course as is 

• Improve the infrastructure of the course 

• Modify golf operations to increase revenue 

• Close the course and look for alternative park uses 
Neighbors responded with a good deal of skepti- 
cism, and if PARD hoped for validation of its desire 
to close the course, it was not forthcoming. Instead, 
questions focused on: 

• Would better management of the course and its 
operations improve the bottom line? (The answer? 
Some changes are in the works.) 

• Does the interfund transfer listed as an expense 
on Hancock’s budget really represent money spent 


at Hancock? (No, but we can get those figures.) 

• Why can’t the course use reclaimed water from 
the line that’s been upgraded along Red River, in 
part for that specific purpose? (Ask Austin 
Water.) 

• If bond money is apparently available for the 
Hancock Recreation Center, could that not 
improve golf operations as well? 

• Especially combined with the likely closure of 
Lions Municipal Golf Course in 2019, this 
seems like further erosion of central-city services 
and amenities. (OK, that’s not a question, but it was 
clearly a sentiment circulating in the room.) 

There was also considerable venting about why 
the process has not been more public thus far; sev- 
eral attendees noted that they had no authorization 
from their neighbors to brainstorm ideas or repre- 
sent public opinion on policy matters and suggest- 
ed that if PARD wants public feedback, it should 
hold public meetings. (“The people who are going 
to yell at you - you want them to yell at you now, or 
else they’ll yell at you later,” as one wag put it.) 

PARD staff promised to compile a lot of 
requested information and come back to the 
neighborhoods in more public settings - time and 
place to be determined. One thing everyone did 
stress was that the Hancock tract will always 
remain public parkland, no matter what happens 
to the golf course; as many of the meeting’s 
attendees noted, by City Charter, it takes a 
public election to sell, loan, trade, or otherwise 
encumber dedicated parkland. - Nick Barbaro 



ation and that the slowdown - combined with 
the Oct. 25 announcement of the second 
U.S.-based Fl event - may endanger any 
application to the state’s Major Events 
Trust Fund. She also declared that she 
would not commit those funds (promised at 
an annual incremental sales tax reimburse- 
ment of $25 million for 10 years) prior to an 
actual race, a shift from earlier suggestions 
that the state money would be available in 
advance to prepay the event’s sanctioning 
fee to Fl. Off the record, optimistic insiders 
say they’re interpreting Combs’ statement as 
her office applying leverage for McCombs 
and Epstein. - Richard Whittaker 



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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 17 







Tire Slasher Convicts Himself 


Seventeen long years after the legendary 
Hyde Park tire slasher first began wreak- 
ing his peculiar brand of havoc in Central 
Austin, it took less than half an hour for a 
Travis County jury to decide last Wednes- 
day, Nov. 9, that behind the madness was 
Tommy Joe Kelley, a 56-year-old homeless 
man with a rap sheet the length of a 
Russian novel. For citizens of Hyde Park, it 
was the end of a long neighborhood night- 
mare that included hundreds of 
instances of tire-directed crimi- 
nal mischief, resulting in 
tens of thousands of dol- 
lars in damage and an 
unquantifiable amount 
of irritation and 
angst. For Kelley, it 
was the beginning 
of a new private 
nightmare: 10 years 
in prison, with the 
very real possibili- 
ty that more court 
cases, and more 
years, could be 
on the way. 

Kelley’s two- 
day trial - held last 
week in Judge 
Julie Kocurek’s 
390th Criminal 
District Court - was, if 
nothing else, proof of 
the old saw that a man 
who defends himself has a 
fool for a client. Deemed 
competent to stand trial by a 
court-appointed psychiatrist follow- 
ing his February arrest, Kelley opted to 
defend himself, a decision that resulted in 
several key legal missteps that any first- 
year trial lawyer might have readily avoid- 
ed. Kelley’s inexperience turned what 
should have been a straightforward, win- 
nable case dealing with one count of unlaw- 
ful use of a criminal instrument and cir- 
cumstantial evidence (Kelley was spotted 
by a police officer sharpening a thin, long 
piece of metal on the ground into a fine 


point on Dec. 31, 2010) into a sprawling saga 
about an angry man with a long criminal 
record and a history of drunken violence, 
the neighbors he tormented, the police offi- 
cers he battled nearly every day of his life, 
and - most damning of all - the Homeric, 
near-mythic collection of automobile-direct- 
ed crimes he allegedly perpetrated over the 
course of almost two decades. 

It didn’t have to be that way. At the close 
of the first day, prosecutors Jason 
English and Rob Drummond 
had failed to convince 
Kocurek to allow the testi- 
mony of the case’s lead 
detective, Eric 

Hoduski, and Hyde 
Park Neighborhood 
Association Tire 



All the prosecution had 
to do was take what 
Kelley had given them 


Slasher Task Force 
leader Heather 
Freeman (testimo- 
ny the prosecutors 
said would introduce 
Kelley’s history of tire 
assaults, establish a pat- 
tern of criminal behavior 
identical to that of the slash- 
er, and show an uptick in inci- 
dents when Kelley was out of jail) on 
the grounds that it would be speculative, 
“extremely prejudicial,” and based on hear- 
say. With that decision, it looked like Kelley 
had a real chance - that the county’s case 
was too circumstantial to convince a jury of 
criminal intent. Things looked so bad for 
the district attorney’s case, in fact, that 
Freeman (who had methodically amassed 
evidence against Kelley for months) admit- 
ted to this reporter outside the courtroom, 
“We’re losing.” 


But on the second day, Kelley began 
presenting his case, and almost immedi- 
ately the wheels came off. He called sev- 
eral police officers to the stand whose 
testimony opened the door for the prose- 
cution to talk about his criminal record, 
his long and hostile history with the 
Austin Police Department, and the whole 
legend of the Hyde Park tire slasher, a 
story that otherwise would have remained 
unknown to the jury. Then Kelley let 
HPNA co-Vice President Lisa Harris 
explain to the jury how slashing incidents 
waned during periods when Kelley was in 
jail and jumped again when he was free. 
You could almost feel the noose tighten- 
ing in the courtroom. 

Finally, waiving his constitutional right 
not to incriminate himself, Kelley withered 
under cross-exami- 
nation by English, 
admitting to having 
slashed tires in the 
past, to holding a 
grudge against APD 
and the people of 
Hyde Park, and even 
to lying on the stand 
under oath. From there, all the prosecution 
had to do was take what Kelley had given 
them and tie it all into a single narrative, 
stacking up circumstantial evidence until it 
added up to proof beyond a reasonable 
doubt that Kelley wasn’t just a persecuted 
homeless man with a homemade knife, but 
the one and only tire slasher. 

Drummond persuaded the jury to sen- 
tence Kelley to 10 years by saying the 
defendant had “violated the community 
and the people he lived among. . . . He tears 
at the fabric of this community.” That may 
have been Kelley’s crime on the streets of 
Hyde Park, but his sin in the courtroom was 
summed up best by something Drummond 
said earlier to a colleague, while the jury 
was deliberating: “Cross-examinations are 
usually more suicidal than homicidal.” 
Pending any prosecution on the related 
charges, Kelley has 10 years to think about 
what might have been. - Josh Rosenblatt 



Victory for Vincent 
in APA Election 

Austin police officers have voted to keep their 
union president, Sgt. Wayne Vincent, for a sec- 
ond three-year term. Vincent beat out CpI. Mike 
Bowen, who had been serving as the Austin 
Police Association’s second in command, by a 
vote of 554-345. Taking over that VP spot is Sgt. 
Todd Harrison, who also currently serves as pres- 
ident of statewide cop union Combined Law 
Enforcement Associations of Texas. There was 
speculation among cop watchers that both 
Vincent and Harrison were vulnerable to defeat: 
Vincent earned the ire of some among the ranks 
for his push to buy a new union hall without vet- 
ting the expensive real estate deal with union 
members; Harrison was the center of his own bit 
of controversy this summer connected to his use 
of association business leave time to cover his 
APD salary while he was actually off working on 
CLEAT business. Harrison said in his campaign 
that being president of CLEAT will not affect his 
ability to serve as VP for APA. (For more on the 
building deal, see “Police Group at Odds Over 
Property Deal,” July 1; for more on the ABL time 
issue, see “Time Bandits in Uniform?,” Aug. 12.) 

- Jordan Smith 


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Perry’s Poll Dance 

Five months ago, campaign pros Dave 
Carney and Rob Johnson were applauded 
for jumping ship from Newt Gingrich’s ailing 
presidential nomination campaign and sign- 
ing back on with their old boss Rick Perry. 
Quick lesson: Switch campaigns in haste, 
repent at leisure. The mid-November national 
polls show Gingrich and Perry’s fellow Texan, 
Congressman Ron Paul, gaining ground fast 
on front-runner Mitt Romney. Meanwhile 
Perry’s numbers continue to collapse, and 
ever since his ill-fated performance at the 
Nov. 9 CNBC debate, his campaign has been 
summed up by one word: “oops.” 

Perry’s campaign had been on life support 
for weeks. Yet his failure to remember which 
three federal departments he had pledged to 
close down if he became president - Educa- 
tion, Commerce, and the hard-to-recall Energy 
- may have been the long-anticipated death 
blow. Having already threatened to pull out of 
future debates, Perry’s campaign geniuses 
decided to bypass the stump and launch a 
charm offensive. Their solution was an 
uncomfortable and unfunny appearance on 
the Late Show With David Letterman, reading 
a supposedly self-deprecating Top 10 list 
(plans for follow-up tours of the Borscht Belt 
and the Chitlin’ Circuit are way premature). 

The governor’s latest desperate populist flail 
is his “Uproot and Overhaul Washington” plan, 
in which he suggests halving congressional pay 
and limiting federal judicial appointments to 18 


years. However, this may not play well with the 
national Republican Party: Larding the U.S. 
Supreme Court with conservative jurists is a 
key part of the GOP’s long-term strategy to 
retain power even when they lose Congress and 
the White House. However, the Texas GOP’s dis- 
dain for national strategies was made clear 
Oct. 26, when the state party launched the 
“Raised in Texas, Stays in Texas” campaign. 
Decrying the tithe collected by groups like the 
Republican National Committee, Republican 


Party of Texas Chair Steve Munisteri whined 
that it was Texas money being “sent to Wash- 
ington, D.C., and doled out across the country.” 
None of this seems to have helped Perry, 
who has not led a major national poll since 
mid-September, when CNN showed him beating 
Romney by seven points. He’s lost more than 
half his support since then, and polls show 
him stuck in single digits in three key early pri- 
mary states: Iowa, New Hampshire, and South 
Carolina. Oops indeed. - Richard Whittaker 



RICK PERRY 
DEATH WATCH 


Another Execution for Texas 

At press time, the state was set to execute Guadalupe Esparza for the 
1999 sexual assault and murder of 7-year-old Alyssa Vasquez. Esparza 
was slated for lethal injection on Wednesday evening; courts had rejected 
a bid to have his execution postponed while lawyers pursued an appeal on 
grounds that he might be mentally retarded, the San Antonio Express- 
News reported this summer. Esparza had previous convictions for aggra- 
vated sexual assault and for possession of cocaine. He will be the 477th 
inmate executed since the reinstatement of the death penalty and the 
238th to die under Gov. Rick Perry. - Jordan Smith 



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20 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







I^lml 


the hightower report 

BY JIM HIGHTOWER 


BORDER WAR! NOT ... 

Grim-faced military officers and ashen- 
faced politicians describe a horrific “war 
zone,” with “hundreds of people murdered” 
and “citizens under attack around the 
clock.” Some of the politicos say that the 
situation is so dire that it “may require 
our military.” 

Like the frenetic Bush-Cheney litany of 
lies that rushed America into the senseless 
Iraq war, what we’re now getting is a similar 
burst of mendacity about Mexican drug vio- 
lence spilling across the border into our 
country. Rick Perry, the Texas gubernatorial 
goober, is even trying to make it a presiden- 
tial campaign issue. “It is not safe on that 
border,” he recently wailed to New 
Hampshire Republicans, suggesting that he 
might send U.S. troops into Mexico “to kill 
these drug cartels.” 

Adding to this macho melodrama, two 
retired Army generals produced a study 
asserting that spillover violence makes 
residing on the U.S. side “tantamount to 
living in a war zone.” One of the ex-gener- 
als is Barry McCaffrey, the infamous, 


hyperventilating fearmonger who once was 
America’s drug czar. At a press conference, 
McCaffrey pointed excitedly to “hundreds 
of people murdered on our side of 
the frontier.” 

Really? Hundreds murdered? No. His 
source turned out to be a South Texas 
rancher full of anecdotes about dead bodies 
found in the brush - but the U.S. Border 
Patrol says these were unlucky immigrants 
who perished during the past several years 
trying to enter our country, not recent vic- 
tims of Mexican cartels. In fact, far from 
being a chaotic war scene, a study of the 14 
Texas counties bordering Mexico shows that 
the number of murders has actually gone 
down in the past five years. 

Rumors of a Mexican cartel war in the U.S. 
are nothing but lies by self-serving political 
opportunists and self-aggrandizing military 
contractors out to line their pockets. 

For more information on Jim Hightower’s work - and 
to subscribe to his award-winning monthly newsletter ; 
“The Hightower Lowdown” - visit www.jimhightower.com. 
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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 21 







I^lml 



Designed To Fail 

As AISD contemplates repurposing Pearce Middle School - again - is the 
district promoting single-sex trends at the expense of current students? 


BY RICHARD WHITTAKER 

It is early afternoon at the James E. Pearce College 
Preparatory Academy. In the main office, a grandfather is 
worrying about his granddaughter. He has been dropping 
her off at 6:30 in the morning, but the school is telling him 
that she is tardy when the bell rings at 8:10. The issue is the 
three-minute gap between classes: She is taking too long 
between classrooms, and that goes down as a tardy, just like 
being late for assembly. This is all part of the new, tougher, 
and more rigorous regime under Principal Texanna Turner, 
the person assigned to make every Pearce student college- 
ready by the time he or she graduates. Three months ago, 
Turner did not even have a real sign outside of her campus, 
just a banner. Now she has a sign, a full campus, a new aca- 
demic model, and a lot of community good will. 

So why is the district administration already talking 
about pulling the plug and turning Pearce into a single-sex 
academy? 

Depending on whom you ask, Pearce is one of three 
things. It’s the campus that the Austin Independent School 
District just cannot fix. It’s the campus that the Texas 
Education Agency loves to beat up. Or it’s a beloved neigh- 
borhood school. 

In fact, it is all three. The middle school campus has been 
classified as “academically unacceptable” six of the last 
eight years - but that is in a context of shifting and ever- 
toughening Texas Education Agency regulations. Staff 
members who were helping turn the school around were 
dumped in 2009 under a TEA-infLicted repurposing, and the 
campus has been in a wild state of flux ever since. Last year, 
under Principal Trana Allen, it held only seventh and 
eighth grades. Now Allen is gone, last year’s students were 
packed off to other campuses - including a hybrid eighth- 
grade academy at Reagan High - and Pearce is filled with 
sixth and seventh graders who have never been on a mid- 
dle-school campus before. Yet Turner is optimistic about 
this new start. “It was so exciting,” she said about the first 
day of the semester. “I remember we all met in the cafeteria 
to have breakfast, and then we went to the gym and had 
what we call a ‘scholar walk.’ I called on each feeder school. 
‘So if you’re an Andrews Alligator, stand up’ - and then I 


thanked them for being there and told them the scores they 
were bringing to this campus.” The purpose, Allen contin- 
ued, “was to show them that they were the crew to change 
the stigma. ... ‘You’re going to be the ones to make this 
district see that this is a great school.’” 

And the new crew is not only the students - the Pearce of 
2011 is not the Pearce of 2010. The building may look the 
same, but it has none of the same teachers, almost none of 
the same staff, and a completely new cadre of students. 
Even before people knew what Turner was planning, there 
was one big sign of community support for the new-look 
school. She had expected 175 sixth-grade kids on opening 
day and had staffed accordingly. She actually got 210, plus 
169 seventh graders. “We ended 
up hiring a new sixth-grade sci- 
ence [teacher] and a sixth-grade 
social studies teacher,” Turner 
said, but that still left her con- 
tending with large class sizes. 

After the district gutted its work 
force in response to state budget 
cuts, AISD’s new target teacher- 
student ratio is 29-to-l - but, 

Turner said, “I don’t want a math 
class that large.” Her solution 
was to reclassify her math spe- 
cialists - intended to be support 
staff for struggling students - as 
classroom teachers, so now “instead of having two math 
teachers for sixth grade, I have four.” There are more pre- 
Advanced Placement classes, and she’s even trying to rip 
the stigma from special education. Rather than having the 
kids who need a little more help shipped off to a special 
class, the tutors are coming into the classrooms. She said: 
“If you’re the sixth-grade special education teacher that 
supports that class, this is your class, too. Both of you are 
the teacher of record.” 

But there is a shark swimming in Pearce’s now calmer 
waters - and it is the threat of being turned into a single- 
sex campus. In typical contemporary AISD fashion, there 


has been a nonconversation going on that dates back to 
June 20, when Superintendent Meria Carstarphen made an 
oblique reference to potentially turning both Pearce and 
Garcia middle schools into separate boys’ and girls’ schools 
(see “‘Are We Having Fun Yet?,”’ Newsdesk blog, June 20). 
After months of speculation, that conversation finally sur- 
faced publicly at the AISD board of trustees work session 
on Monday, Nov. 7, when trustees received a presentation 
from the administration with very specific details. What is 
being touted is two single-gender middle schools, each 
holding 650 students. Their combined attendance zones 
would cover much of East Austin, mapping almost pre- 
cisely the Pearce and Garcia boundaries, plus part of 
Dobie’s footprint. In a gung-ho presentation, district staff 
argued a cornucopia of benefits, from gender-specific edu- 
cation models to better role models. The plan would not 
come cheap: While much of the $10 million first-year 
operation budget will be offset by reallocating existing 
resources and programs, the district will still be looking for 
a million dollars in external funding to cover start-up and 
facilities costs. 

Turner has dealt with problem schools before and knows 
what it takes to turn them around. She said, “I was princi- 
pal at Sims [Elementary School] when we were on the roller 
coaster, up and down, up and down ... but it was three to 
five years before we got to the point where I could say, 
‘What we have works.’” And she fears that families may not 
believe that this is the real reform package: Since the 
school year began, parents have approached her about the 
rumors of Pearce getting overhauled yet again. “They are 
afraid,” she said. When they’ve asked her about the single- 
sex school rumors, she said: “My answer to them is that I 
truly don’t know. I just tell them that we have to be ready 
for whatever comes.” 

No one is really happy about the historic situation at 
either Pearce or Garcia, as both campuses have been regu- 
larly classified as “academically unacceptable.” Associate 
Superintendent of Middle Schools Bergeron Harris called 
East Austin “a community that I want to say perceives that 
they’ve been neglected in the system for quite a while, but 
I think that I can take out the word ‘perceives.’” He has 
been on the ground for some of the worst years for Pearce, 
and one of his first tasks as middle school chief was to 
implement the 2009 reconstitution plan. “When you go over 
to Pearce now, you see and you feel the impact of some very 
thoughtful plans,” he said. But if the district is still midway 
through a three-year reform cycle and everyone is looking 
for green shoots, why is the admin- 
istration already talking about 
another change of direction? 

Stuck in the Middle 

The district is actually consider- 
ing a total of four single-sex acad- 
emies. In addition to Pearce and 
Garcia, there is already the Ann 
Richards School for Young Women 
Leaders, and now the district has 
a $4.6 million grant from the 
Moody Foundation to explore 
opening a School for Young Men, 
covering grades six through 12. 
Such grants drive the conversation in subtle and not-so- 
subtle ways, and even the terms of public discussion. 
Harris said: “We’re playing with the term now. We said 
‘single-gender,’ and today in a meeting we said ‘single- 
sex.’” In part, that language is driven by whichever big 
grant is on the table today and whatever name a potential 
donor feels easiest with. 

The mantra from the board and the administration 
remains the same: They’re “just talking,” just “spit-balling 
ideas,” just “making backup plans” in case the current 
system does not work. But district families have been 

continued on p.24 


There has been a nonconversation 
going on that dates back to 
June 20, when Superintendent 
Meria Carstarphen made an 
oblique reference to potentially 
turning both Pearce and Garcia 
middle schools into separate 
boys' and girls' schools. 


22 ihe Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 





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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 23 





ME lAf S DESIGNED TO FAIL continued from p. 22 



burned on district plans before and have 
shown little patience for adding single-sex 
schools. A misguided attempt in 2007 to 
convert Webb Middle School into a boys’ 
academy delivered former Superintendent 
Pat Forgione his most embarrassing defeat 
(see “Forgione’s BEST-Laid Plan for 
Closing Webb,” Feb. 16, 2007). However, 
Harris argued that times and moods have 
changed. Single-sex schools “are popping 
up in different places,” he said. “Previously 
I don’t think we had a lot of examples, but 
with the advent of charter schools and 
people being open to new designs, we hear 
now about all the different single-gender, 
mostly male academies and the successes 
they’re touting.” 

However, single-sex schools are not the 
only alternative being touted as a replace- 
ment for traditional coed public schools, and 
it seems like middle schools are the simplest 
and easiest targets for such experiments. 
After all, elementaries and prekindergar- 
tens are too busy handling educational 
basics to see much reform, and high schools 
are caught up in remediation and college 
prep, so middle schools are the easiest place 
to tinker with the program. Moreover, if TEA 
stats are anything to go by, then middle 
schools are the problem child of AISD. Of 18 
middle schools, six were classified as “aca- 
demically unacceptable” this year, compared 
with only two of the district’s 16 high schools. 
While district administrators perpetually 
argue that elementaries are where the trou- 
ble starts, every single AISD elementary is 
at least “academically acceptable,” and ele- 
mentaries account for the overwhelming 


majority of the district’s “exemplary” cam- 
puses - the TEA’s highest accolade. So what 
is the difference between middle and ele- 
mentary schools? “It’s called the ‘building 
change effect,”’ explained Harris. “They 
leave one school setting and they go to 
another, [and] there tends to be an academic 
dip.” If things are going to go wrong for stu- 
dents, it seems that middle school is where 
it starts. In AISD, that problem puts the 
spotlight on Harris, and he has theories as to 
why sixth grade is such a problematic tran- 
sition. He said: “People see middle school 
and everyone goes, ‘Uuuuh!’ It’s not because 
of middle school. They think about adoles- 
cence and their experience of adolescence.” 

Indeed, the teenage transition has real 
academic consequences. Turner is dealing 
with some seemingly anomalous statistics 
- not least that her kids whose sixth grade 
stayed with their elementary scored better 
than the kids who went straight into middle 
school. If those numbers stand up, then that 
could have dramatic consequences for how 
AISD splits school ages. Traditionally, mid- 
dle schools have been just for sixth through 
eighth grades: Now Pearce is sixth and sev- 
enth grades, Garcia is seventh and eighth, 
and Ann Richards goes from sixth to 10th. 
However, 14 of AISD’s 80 elementary schools 
hold on to their sixth graders, and AISD is 
already looking at a K-through-eighth 
school model. Harris said he has even seen 
positive research on moving ninth grade 
back to middle school. 

Unfortunately, that research casts a 
strange pall over the district’s decision to 
house Pearce’s eighth graders at Reagan 


High in an 8th Grade College Prep 
Academy. The eighth grade staff was 
recently told to consider this a part of 
Reagan, but the integration is far from 
complete. Classes are taught in whatever 
space is available, and their numbers are 
so small that they are often overstretched 
on such seemingly simple tasks as taking 
children to and from lunch. Extracurricular 
activities, if they are provided, occur over 
at Pearce. For all the talk of this being a 
Reagan facility, many students will trans- 
fer to LBJ next year, increasing the sense 
of impermanence. Staff members, some of 
whom were hired only days before the 
start of the new school year, have no rea- 
son to feel secure in their jobs: Next year, 
Pearce will take its eighth grade back, and 
these teachers have no guarantee they’ll 
be going with it. 

To Harris and the district, these years of 
grade flux at Pearce are “breathing room.” 
But to students, staff, and families, they rep- 
resent just another chapter in the chaotic ride 
at Pearce, and surrounding schools are feel- 
ing the collateral damage. Last year it was the 
elementaries that had to absorb Pearce’s 
sixth graders; this year it is Reagan with an 
influx of eighth graders. That means hiring 
staff, finding space, rescheduling lunch times. 
If Pearce and Garcia go single-sex, then 
Dobie and Webb will absorb those students 
who prefer to attend a coed middle school. 
That would be another round of logistical 
headaches - not least that there would be no 
mixed middle school in most of East Austin. 
A parent currently able to walk her child to 
Overton Elementary would face a 12-mile 
round trip to the nearest coed middle school. 
TUrner is meeting regularly with administra- 
tors throughout the combined Reagan/LBJ 
Vertical Team, making sure her kids are really 
ready for high school, but she’s already more 
than aware how changes 
in one school can reverber- 
ate through every neigh- 
boring campus. She said: 

“When we chose to reopen 
Kealing to have another 
neighborhood school and 
it morphed into something 
completely different, and 
when they moved the 
Liberal Arts Academy to 
LBJ, look at what it did to 
the new Eastside. Those 
are just domino effects.” 

However, Harris 
believes the district can 
convince parents that 
change is not only in their best interests, but 
it really is not change at all. He said: “We said 
at Pearce we were going to build an early col- 
lege prep model, and that’s what we’re doing. 
... Whether it’s a single-sex school or not, it 
would still be a college prep academy.” 

Single Sex, or 
Magnets in Disguise? 

While no firm decision has been made 
about locations for additional single-sex 
schools, board President Mark Williams 
said: “There are some likely candidates. 


When you think about these ideas, certain 
schools might come to mind as making 
more sense than others.” Williams said he 
would want “a pretty strong business case 
analysis” that would address any concerns 
about board and community buy-in, “and 
that’s where the challenge of time would 
come in.” With the board expected to vote on 
Carstarphen’s initial round of annual facility 
recommendations in a month, Williams said 
he doubted big changes for Pearce or Garcia 
would be likely for the 2012-13 year: However, 
that doesn’t mean there could not be a vote 
for the 2014 or 2015 years. 

For board Vice President Vince Torres, the 
board may have more than enough on its 
plate for 2012. Even without a single-sex 
push, the trustees are likely to be mulling 
proposals for two-way dual language pro- 
grams and a charter school contract for 
Eastside Memorial (see “Not Everyone Keen 
on Charter IDEA,” Nov. 11) at their Dec. 12 
work session. And for Torres, even as an 
alumnus of the then-all-male U.S. Naval 
Academy, the jury is still out on single-sex 
academies, though he did note that they may 
provide “the environment that some students 
are not going to find in a standard school.” 
Political pressure and district enthusiasm 
about single-sex schools notwithstanding, 
their growth may come down to one simple 
question: Do they work? AISD has become 
very defensive on that issue. On Oct. 6, the 
district’s Department of Public Relations & 
Multicultural Outreach issued a statement 
declaring, “To be clear, the Ann Richards 
School (ARS), and many other diverse sin- 
gle-gender schools across the country, have 
exceptional outcomes.” This, the statement 
continued, was to counter “research [that] 
may confuse the community about the 
effectiveness of single-gender education.” 
That was a direct shot at one of the dis- 
trict’s oldest and stron- 
gest allies in academic 
reform, the University of 
Texas, and in particular 
a paper in the journal 
Science titled “The 
Pseudoscience of Single- 
Sex Schooling.” 

Co-authored by UT psy- 
chology professor 
Rebecca Bigler, the paper 
was a review of the entire 
body of research on sin- 
gle-sex schooling. AISD 
did not respond to our 
request for comment. 
Bigler’s findings were 
stark: That neither neurological studies, 
qualitative research, nor grade reports show 
any validity to the concept of “gender-spe- 
cific learning styles,” and that reported 
improvements in performance might be 
due to academies cherry-picking students, 
contrary to the stated policy. 

Bigler told the Chronicle, “It’s very fash- 
ionable to put boys and girls in [functional 
magnetic resonance imaging] machines and 
say boys’ brains are different to girls’ brains, 
but a lot of that research has failed to be 
replicated.” In fact, her report concluded 
there’s evidence that by splitting boys from 


“[Parents] are afraid 
My answer to them is 
that I truly don 't know. 
I just tell them that we 
have to be ready for 
whatever comes. " 

- Pearce Middle 
School Principal 
Texana Turner 


24 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



girls, “gender divisions are made even more 
salient” in students’ minds, and that the 
political allure of single-sex schools disguis- 
es and reinforces institutionalized sexism. 
Rather than fencing teenagers off from each 
other, Bigler said, “We argue that boys need 
to learn as well as girls need to learn that 
sexual harassment is inappropriate.” 

For the district, the most controversial 
aspect of Bigler’s research was another 
paper she and two of her colleagues wrote 
for Sex Roles: A Journal of Research, called 
“The Efficacy of Single-Sex Education: 
Testing for Selection and Peer Quality 
Effects.” The report focused on an unnamed 
“public single-sex middle school in the 
Southwest United States,” but district insid- 
ers quickly realized that the authors were 
talking about AISD’s original single-sex 
academy, the Ann Richards School. The 
study compared the reading and writing 
scores for three groups: 121 girls who suc- 
cessfully applied to the campus, 229 unsuc- 
cessful applicants, and 134 girls attending a 
coed magnet. When comparing grade 
improvements from the single-sex academy 
and the coed magnet, the authors conclud- 
ed that “it is overall peer quality, rather 
than the gender composition of the schools, 
that explains single-sex school students’ 
outperformance of coeducational school 
students.” For AISD, the real bombshell was 
in the comparison between successful and 
unsuccessful applicants. The district has 
always claimed that it runs a simple lottery 


system for Ann Richards, with all appli- 
cants having an equal chance of getting in. 
Yet the report showed that successful appli- 
cants were already outscoring the unsuc- 
cessful applicants in the fifth grade tests. If 
the school is snagging the best applicants, 
is it any surprise they outscore their peers? 

Asked about Bigler’s research, AISD did 
not directly address the admissions ques- 
tions, but said, “Ann Richards shows larger 
growth than most campuses and is, in fact, 
among the highest performing schools.” 

With all the research and rumors and 
grant proposals in the air, the only thing 
TUrner can do is run her school. Now that 
she knows how many students she has and 
knows their Texas Assessment of Knowledge 
and Skills scores, she has screened every 
student in math and reading so she can tran- 
sition them into next year. “I walked around 
when they were taking those tests,” she said, 
“and they did a really good job. They worked 
hard.” Similarly, she’s studying her staff, 
seeing which ones she may want to move to 
handle the new eighth grade. With an extra 
grade’s worth of students in the fall, she is 
already planning how she will allocate rooms 
for next year. That means un-mothballing 
whole wings of the campus - some parts of 
which have been locked up for two years. 
That means planning and budgeting now - 
presuming that Pearce will still be Pearce in 
one or two or three years’ time. She said, “All 
I want to make sure is that, whatever hap- 
pens, we do a good job this year.” ■ 



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Flash Mob Dance 
Revolution: Part 2 


To overthrow a tyrant is dangerous and 
difficult, but it is a great deal easier than 
overthrowing a worldwide economic system. 

If economies simply stop, everyone suf- 
fers. So a nonviolent economic revolution 
must rebuild as it destroys. That’s no mean 
trick. In fact, it’s never been done. This 
does not mean it cannot be done. 

Nonviolence is the key. Tiananmen Square 
made it clear that nonviolence can lose, but 
Tahrir Square made it just as clear that non- 
violence is the only way to win - and it is the 
only way to keep economies moving while 
working people win. 

How to win? That question finds its 
answer only through experiment in action. 
The Velvet Revolution of the Soviet bloc, 
the ongoing Arab Spring, and the Occupy 
movement share a means. Employ a decen- 
tralized action-response-action process as 
events present themselves, a process of 
plan-improvise-plan, a process that adheres 
to nonviolence as its first principle and 
depends on the truth power fears most: You 
cannot arrest a population. 


Involve significant elements of a popula- 
tion in a movement, and there aren’t enough 
jails or guns to stop it. Syrians facing 
vicious repression have proven this daily 
for months. The question “How will work- 
ers around the world neutralize corporate 
power?” will be answered as this question is 
not asked but dared and acted upon. 

Keep the target firmly in mind. The tar- 
get is not government (the U.S. Constitution 
works pretty well when corporate money 
cannot buy politicians); the target is a cor- 
porate-dominated economic system. 

We can win. (You cannot arrest a popula- 
tion.) But a workers’ revolution will test us 
most critically after we win. Then the cru- 
cial question will be: When the economy is 
ours to rebuild, can we apply those nonvi- 
olent and decentralized principles that 
gave us victory? Only by extending the 
principles of nonviolence and decentral- 
ization to commerce can we create an 
economics worthy of us, remembering 
every moment of every day that the ends 
never justify the means. The means 


become the ends. The means determine 
the institutions we shall create. 

The task is to create modes of commerce 
in which all concerned are treated fairly. All 
means all, including the people we oppose. 
I am as committed to their freedom as I am 
to my own. Without commitment to every- 
one’s freedom, freedom is ultimately impos- 
sible. If I am to be free, I must commit to 
your freedom, whomever you are. That is 
the law of liberty. 

Karl Marx (1818-1883) tried to address 
these issues. His mistake was to assert that 
the value of a product consists of the labor 
that goes into it. On paper, that looks logi- 
cal. It’s logical to assume, as Marx did, that 
> all products are created by labor, hence the 
amount of labor that goes into a product is 
what makes it valuable, so the laborer is the 
value and should therefore own the means 
of production. It’s logical, but it’s not real. 

This is real: Three elements - labor, 
invention, and investment - are 
essential to any commercial 
enterprise. A workers’ revo- 
lution organizes these ele- 
ments not for the wealth 
of a few but for the health 
of communities. 

It is easy to claim, as 
Marxists do, that inven- 
tion and investment 
consist of stored-up labor, 
since any invention builds 
on all previous human 
effort and investment comes 
from profits squeezed out of 
others’ previous labor. 

There are two problems with that 
analysis: It makes anything that is not labor 
an enemy, and it defines change as a redress 
of the past. But an us vs. them vision dooms 
society to continual conflict. And we cannot 
make the past behave because the past no 
longer exists. What’s real is that everyone 
exists in the present, and the present, to be 
livable and just, must profit the many. 

After a victorious workers’ revolution, the 
same factories, farms, and stores will exist. 
Communist Russia and China attempted 
drastic, immediate reorganizations of their 
factories, farms, and stores; this caused 
decades of deprivation and oppression. We 
can thank Russia and China for proving 


that drastic, doctrinaire reorganization does 
not work. 

So what can work? The answer depends 
on how we value those three essential ele- 
ments: labor, invention, and investment. 

The value of labor has been quantified by 
assigning an hourly wage as low as the mar- 
ket will bear. But that is not how to quantify 
labor. When you subtract labor from com- 
merce, invention and investment become 
useless. Without labor, invention and invest- 
ment cannot function. That is the true 
value of labor, whether skilled or unskilled. 
The necessity of labor puts labor on equal 
footing with invention and investment. 

Next, consider invention. An invention 
may be no more than the decor and menu of 
a restaurant, or it may be as sophisticated as 
a smartphone. But whatever the invention, 
without it investment and labor have noth- 
ing to do. Invention’s function is equal. 

In a just economy, function determines 
value. 

As for investment, inven- 
tion and labor can’t get far 
without it. The mistake has 
been to assign investment 
all the power when, in 
practice, without inven- 
tion and labor, the money 
of investment is useless. 
None of these elements 
labor, investment, 
invention - can function 
without the others. 

The formula for justice, 
then, is simple: Labor, inven- 
tion, and investment deserve 
equal profit, equal freedom, and equal 
decision-making power. 

To claim that investment is the paramount 
element is as abstract, as unrealistic, as 
Marx’s claim that labor deserves all. Yet this 
has been the logic of the so-called “free mar- 
ket,” a system in which investment gets the 
lion’s share, invention gets a cut, and labor 
gets as little as possible. Marx’s logic creates 
stagnation and oppression; the logic of the 
so-called free market (in which no one 
behaves freely but the rich) also creates stag- 
nation and oppression. A workers’ revolution 
must replace the free market, not with the 
restrictions of socialism, but with truly free 
commerce - freedom alive in the workplace. 




26 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


Partial examples of a free workplace exist 
now, as described by the Chronicle’s Mike 
Crissey in an email to me: 

“The cooperative business model has 
been around since 1844. We don’t need to 
Occupy Wall Street; we need to abandon 
Wall Street, to stop giving our money to 
plutocratic banks and financiers. We need 
to put our money in cooperatively owned 
businesses (credit unions, for example), 
democratically run by their owners who 
also happen to be the sole beneficiaries of 
the businesses - by law, all profits must be 
reinvested in the cooperative or returned to 
owners. They have clearly stated business 
practices, open records and are account- 
able to democratically elected boards.” 
Good as far as it goes, but nothing is good 
enough until workers earn not mere wages 
but equity, plus equal say at the power table. 

In the so-called free-market system, 
investment, invention, and labor became 


antagonists, but when you consider their 
functions - how they actually work - they 
are functionally allies. They became antag- 
onists because one element, investment, 
has been allowed to buy dominance. 

When the so-called free market devalues 
labor, even small businesses profit from job 
insecurities created by corporations. 
Employers get equity; stockholders get div- 
idends; wage-earners make barely enough 
to live on. That’s how the stock market goes 
up while workers’ wages and benefits go 
way down. So how is this market free? 
Where is freedom for the many? 

We can change this. We are the 99%. 
Nothing can stop our direct action. 

(To be continued.) ■ 

As of this writing, city governments have moved to stop 
the Occupy movement. How the movement responds will 
he its first great challenge. This essay looks toward next 
spring, when we workers will he tested not only for our 
endurance hut for our vision. 






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EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR PREVIEW 


ARTS LISTINGS 




She was as generous as actors come, onstage and off. 
When you played a scene with her, she gave you her full 
focus, as if whatever you had to say was far more important 
than anything she might utter. And no matter how insipid the 
line or how poor your delivery, she received it as openly as 
the heartfelt declaration of a trusted friend. And that didn’t 
change when the curtain came down and the cast inevitably 
headed off to some watering hole. She talked to you and 
laughed with you and included you as though you’d been a 
part of the gang always, as though you belonged. 

That makes a difference when you’re 23 years old and 
it’s only your third show in town and you’re stepping 
into a role that another actor had filled for the 
first few weeks of rehearsal and everyone else 
had already bonded with him in that way that 
casts do. Then, you feel on the outside of 
things in so many ways, and to be wel- 
comed into the fold and treated like a 
peer is such a gift. She not only made 
that gesture, she made you feel that you 
were better than you were, that you were 
worthy of sharing a stage with someone 
as experienced and talented as she was. 

And oh heavens, she was talented. She 
was, I think, the first actor I knew who could 
truly tap that well of feeling deep inside, the 
place of greatest vulnerability; she could open her 
mouth and open a vein, raw emotion pouring from her. She 
played flinty nuns and flighty Southern belles, Irish drudges 
and Texas floozies, all with equal conviction. There was a spark 
within her - that flame of vivacity some folks are blessed with 
- that would animate any characters she played. They had 
vitality because she had vitality, an uncommon liveliness of 
spirit that made you want to work with her and be around her. 

Her name was Scottie Wilkison, and she died Nov. 5 at 
age 77. I was fortunate enough to share the stage with her 
in five productions in the Eighties. By the time I came along, 
she was a mainstay of the theatre scene - University of 
Texas Department of Drama, class of ’57! - with credits on 
pretty much every stage in town and a shelf full of acco- 
lades. In the first seven years of the B. Iden Payne Awards, 


she earned five prizes for her acting, and she and her hus- 
band, Gordon, were among the first recipients of the Austin 
Circle of Theaters’ Special Recognition Award for outstand- 
ing contributions to local theatre. I don’t know the number of 
times those two opened their hearts, home, and checkbook 
for the riffraff of Austin’s playhouses, but I suspect it’s 
roughly the same as the stars in the Texas sky. 

It was a different time. Austin was less than half the size it 
is today, and the work on its stages almost entirely communi- 
ty theatre. That isn’t to say it lacked for quality - it didn’t - 
but there was a spirit infusing the theatre that isn’t seen 
in Austin much now, though it still thrives in the 
towns around us. Community theatres are driv- 
en by the participants’ love for what they do, 
and, as the name says, the shows are 
made by the community for the communi- 
ty. The sense of shared participation - of 
the theatremakers’ relationships to one 
another and to the audience - exceeds 
what I’ve experienced in any other kind 
of theatre. Scottie was of a generation 
for whom that was the norm, and it 
wasn’t the only reason she gave as much 
as she did - no, her generosity was 
ingrained in her - but I believe it helped 
shape her welcoming spirit in the theatre. 

I’m older today than Scottie was when we 
first worked together at the Zachary Scott Theatre 
Center on The Little Foxes (along with a very young Mary- 
Louise Parker), so when I work with young actors now, I can’t 
help but think about the opportunity I have to extend a wel- 
coming hand to them as she did to me and others my age. I 
strive to follow the example set by her and others of her 
generation: Mavourneen Dwyer, Mac and Frances Mauldin, 
Boyd Vance, Pete Calhoun, John Martin, Charles Hill, and so 
many more. Their names may not be familiar any longer, but 
they made their mark and gave me a connection to this 
community that I still treasure. With Thanksgiving approach- 
ing, I express my gratitude to them and ask that you raise a 
glass to those in your life who took you in and made you 
feel that you belonged. ■ 


■cTrrannn — wsnmmnmx 

1 


Steve Shearer and 
Scottie Wilkison in 
The Trial of Juan 
Beitran r Capitol City 
Playhouse, 1984 




For Those Who Took Us In 


Excise the “interim” from Marcy 
Hoen’s job title. The board of the 
Austin Creative Alliance was evident- 
ly so taken with her leadership of the 
organization during the past eight 
months that it has decided to keep 
her as executive director permanent- 
ly. And what inspired such confi- 
dence? Hoen raced to aid East 
Austin Studio Tour artists who were 
in danger of being fined or shut 
down for noncompliance with city 
commercial codes and Americans With Disabilities Act guide- 
lines. She and ACA staff hosted code compliance seminars to 
inform artists about the situation, and her contributions to a 
city ordinance provided legal status and protection to artists 
who sell art from their homes in conjunction with events like 
EAST. Moreover, she created and instituted the Frameworks 
EAST Fund microloan program to help Eastside artists pay for 
upgrades to their studios. She’s built a partnership between 
the ACA and the Creative Fund, which provides financial sup- 
port to community cultural organizations; advocated for cultur- 
al tourism to the hotel occupancy tax task force working 
group; organized three public forums to discuss issues of 
importance to the creative community; and implemented a 
scholarship program for Leadership Austin’s Emerge program. 
Quite a track record for eight months. 

Now, in what feels rather like Ouroboros territory, I’m 
reporting on an announcement for which I’ve been quoted in 
the press release. For the record, I’m not on the Alliance 
board and wasn’t involved in any decision to hire Hoen in her 
interim or permanent capacity. I was, however, on the 
CreateAustin committee that helped the Austin Circle of 
Theaters transition into the Alliance. It was for that reason I 
was asked for a quote, and I stand by my comment that 
Hoen’s activities with the Alliance to date “are a good indica- 
tor of how far she can take the organization as its permanent 
director.” Hope you could understand that, what with my tail in 
my mouth and all. - R.F. 


Austin Playhouse 

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED 

The stretch of time between Austin Playhouse’s departure 
from its old home in Penn Field this past summer and the 
projected completion of its new home in the Mueller develop- 
ment next summer was just too long for Artistic Director Don 
Toner to go without staging something for his loyal theatrego- 
ing audience. And since he wasn’t really keen on the itiner- 
ant players routine - been there, done that, with both Live 
Oak Theatre, his first company in town, and the Playhouse - 
he decided to do what he does so well: build something. In 
this case, something is a 5 5-foot-by-6 O-foot Quonset-hut- 
shaped tent in which plays can be produced. The $24,000 
structure arrived in parts on the back of a truck in mid-Octo- 
ber, and for four weeks, Toner and Playhouse company mem- 
bers have been assembling the steel arches, covering the 
frame with tension fabric, installing seats, hanging lights, 
building a stage, and doing everything else necessary to 
make the space a functioning theatre. (For more images, 
visit www.austinplayhouse.blogspot.com.) This week, the 129- 
seat venue becomes the home for Austin Playhouse’s 2011- 
2012 season, which will include three to five shows. First 
up: James Goldman’s juicy historical drama The Lion in 
Winter, running Nov. 18-Dec. 18. You can find the space at 
I8OOV2 Simond, which is adjacent to the site for the new 
permanent Austin Playhouse. For more information, call 
476-0084 or visit www.austinplayhouse.com. - R.F 


Austin Creative Alliance 

HOEN TAKES THE REINS FOR GOOD 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 29 



REVIEWS 






EXHIBITIONISM 


employer’s adult son, then the adult son attempts an affair 
with a married woman, who then confronts her husband. The 
characters run a relay around the play, handing off the action 
from one to the next, and what finally emerges is a complex 
story about the harsh dynamics of human interaction. 

It is a mark of Dietz’s skill as a playwright that the circular 
structure of the play is clearly established but never becomes 
predictable. The pacing of the script and the direction, from 
Master of Fine Arts directing candidate Courtney Sale, is 
sharp and well-measured. The motif of the circle, played out 
in the story, the staging, and the set (designed by Chris Yoo), 
might have been nothing more than a gimmick, but in this pro- 
duction it is an intriguing framework for the play’s ideas. 

The ensemble performs with consistency, although in some I 
cases the casting doesn’t achieve what it ought to: An actor < 
who plays one part well never quite earns the audience’s s 
confidence in another. It’s a case of almost but not quite in a “ 
show that is otherwise a solid and intriguing work. It’s not the £ 
scandalous sort of play one might be led to expect - espe- “ 
daily not for theatregoers accustomed to the more experimen- S 
tal side of Austin’s theatre scene - but it is a smart play with £ 
depth and texture. As thought experiments go, 360 is fruitful “ 
and worthwhile. - Elizabeth Cobbe = 

o 


‘West of East' 

Gallery Black Lagoon , 

4301-A Guadalupe, 371-8838 
www.galleryblacklagoon.com 
Friday-Saturday, Nov . 19-20 

It ain’t all EAST right now, hon, OK? There are 
other galleries in this half-naked city, you know, 
and while “West of East,” the current show at 
Gallery Black Lagoon, is a mixed bag of goods, 
we want to point out a thing or two in that 
space next door to the Parlor in Hyde Park. 

Walk on in and glance at what’s on the 
walls in the front. Much of it, especially if your 
vision is nigh unto jaded due to frequent view- 
ing of graphic work, will provoke your “meh” 


response. Some of it, though, like the intricate 
narrative pen-and-inks of Katie Rose Pipkin, will 
make you yearn to know the stories behind the 
depicted scenes. Some kind of Gormenghast 
vibe working in there, it looks like. 

Halfway into the gallery, there’s David 
Lujan’s huge rendering of a bee, and that’s a 
definite note of interest. The image itself is 
lovely, yes, but the method of reproduction is 
what marks this as serious goodness: screen- 
printed, as so many things are, but screen- 
printed on birch, using gum arabic pigments 
and transparent base. Thus: as delicate, col- 
orwise, as it is large, and rendered as if with 
traces of the insect’s own honey. 


But don’t stop there. It’s not that big of 
a gallery - your energy won’t be depleted, 
and besides, you can always grab a slice 
of hot pizza at the Parlor when you leave. 

So keep going to the end. On the final wall 
you’ll see, to the left, a brace of paintings 
by Stephen W. Schwake. Schwake works the 
figurative surrealism mode in oils, his some- 
times cartoonish subjects reined in by solid 
technique to produce shadowed beauties of 
symbolism. Imagine: The New Yorker's Owen 
Smith repainting the creepier parts of Michael 
Sieben’s oeuvre? Yeah. Good times, Gallery 
Black Lagoon. - Wayne Alan Brenner 

continued on p.32 


360 (round dance) 

Oscar G. Brockett Theatre , 

23rd & San Jacinto , 471-5793 , www.finearts.utexas.edu/tad 
Through Nov. 20, Running time: 1 hr., 30 min. 

On the surface, Steven Dietz’s 360 (round dance) 
appears to be about the sexual encounters that link people 
together. Eight actors face off with one another in the cir- 
cular playing space, playing a game of sexual politics that 
eventually leads back to its own beginning. 

Yet despite the warning from the University of Texas 
Department of Theatre & Dance that the play contains mature 
content, there’s really not that much mature content, at least 
as far as things like nudity or rough language go. What’s 
mature about this adaptation of Arthur Schnitzler’s Reigen - a 
play that caused a riot in its own day - is the sensitivity with 
which the encounters between these people are depicted. 
Desire and resentment battle it out in every scene but never 
in the same way. A maid resists the crass advances of her 



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online at www.austintexas.gov/aipp/apply. The deadline is 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 31 








EXHIBITIONISM continued from p.30 



A Lie of the Mind 

Mary Moody Northen Theatre , 

3001 S. Congress , 448-8484 
Through Nov. 20 
Running time: 2 hr., 30 min. 

Paranoia abounds in A Lie of the Mind, Sam 
Shepard’s surrealistic tale of dysfunctional family 
life exposed for all to witness at the Mary Moody 
Northen Theatre. The topic is nothing new for 
Shepard, whose work is often concerned with that 
place called home and the tribulations that can rip 
families to shreds. There’s good reason for that 
paranoia, too: In the first moments of the play we 
are introduced to Jake, who has beaten his wife, 
Beth, to such a degree that he believes her to be 
dead. But in truth she is alive, riddled with brain 
damage and unable to speak coherently. These 
introductions to the play’s primary characters 
presuppose an evening heavy with intense drama, 
promising to leave the observer drained of emo- 
tion. And it does. The surprise, however, is the 
remarkably consistent thread of comedy Shepard 
masterfully weaves throughout the lengthy piece 
(there are two intermissions). This oftentimes pecu- 
liar crackle of the seriocomic is what gives A Lie 
of the Mind its thought-provoking resonance and 
leaves one with a startlingly unsettled sense of clo- 
sure at evening’s end. 

To be honest, though, it’s not my favorite play. 
Shepard’s monologues at times grow tedious as 
they labor on, giving one the sense that the same 
content could have been conveyed just as convinc- 
ingly in half the time. Once the point has been 


made (and made again), it becomes easy to lose 
attention. Moreover, the work’s constant shifting 
between the natural and the absurd - which can 
represent a masterstroke of art when the genres 
are mixed seamlessly and convincingly - evokes 
a confused haziness, leaving me with a sense 
that the play is not sure of what it wants to be. 
Nonetheless, the performances in this MMNT 
production are strong on the whole. Meredith 
Montgomery’s Beth is especially well executed as 
she searches with a frustrated rigor for the words 
and steps that now escape her. Montgomery’s 
transformation from fully bandaged invalid into 
the young woman we see at the end of the play, 
walking slowly and with some of her faculties for 
communication reclaimed, provides an especially 
impressive portrait of character development. Jon 
Richardson, as Jake’s brother Frankie, likewise 
exhibits a strong sense of comedic physicality. 

As is typical of Shepard’s plays, A Lie of the Mind 
offers an intricate psychological prism. We’re left 
with many questions, some of which the playwright 
has addressed from his own position, but many 
more of which are left intentionally unanswered. 
Those who attend will be challenged; catharsis 
from some aspect of one or more of the characters 
will likely be experienced. The potential exists to 
laugh and to cry - probably both at once. Director 
Jared J. Stein offers his audience an interpretation 
that glimpses into the mind of one of America’s 
foremost voices of the theatre, and whether or not 
it represents the best of Shepard, it’s worthwhile 
material to chew on. - Adam Roberts 



LONG CENTER PRESENTS 


Dress up and sing 
along to the dassics of 
"The Sound of Music" 


as it plays on Dell Hall's 
giant two-story 
movie screen. 


NOVEMBER 25 | FRI 1:30 & 7PM 
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Tickets also available at the 3M Box Office at the Long Center. 

Groups 10+ call 512.457.5161 orgroupsales@thelongcenter.org ™ mj ram a * 1 1 . 


The Austin Symphony presents pianist 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

NOV 18/19 


Want to experience 
what it’s like to play the 
Liszt? Try to play Anton’s 
part on the digital pianos 
provided by Strait Music 
on the mezzanine level 
before the performance! 


Anton 
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performing 
Liszt and Franck 


Ginastera Variaciones concertantes 
Franck Symphonic Variations 
Liszt Piano Concerto No. 2 in A Major 
Hindemith Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes 
by Carl Maria von Weber 

All artists, programs, and dates subject to change. 

For tickets and information: 

(512) 476-6064 • austinsymphony.org 


. THE 

Austin 



Peter Bay, Music Director 


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32 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinclironicle.com 






Christopher 

Cross 

12/30 


Michael Grimm 


Winner of 

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11/17 


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featuring 

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AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH 
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STANLEY CLARKE BAND 

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3/28/12 

RICKY NELSON REMEMBERED 

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OLETA ADAMS 

4/13/12 

ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY 

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7:30pm I Dec 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 21, 22 
2pm I Dec 4, 11, 17, 18,23 

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LONG CENTER 

Choreography by Stephen Mills 

Music by Peter llyitch Tchaikovsky 

Musical Accompaniment by 
The Austin Symphony Orchestra 


m. 



THE 49TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION OF 


The N utcracker 

Austin's Holiday Tradition 

A magical, memory-making experience for all ages, 
with an army of mischievous mice, a bevy of bon-bons, 
a slurry of sparkling snowflakes, and one jovial Mother 
Ginger. Tchaikovsky's holiday masterpiece sparkles 
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Tickets starting at $1 5 

Visit www.balletaustin.org or call 512476.2163 


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“ T,, “ l Texas T . _ 

iMMu-wMtmi Commission _ 

■ d ih —-L on the Arts 


This project is funded and supported in part by the City of Austin through the Cultural Arts 
Division believing an investment in the Arts is an investment in Austin's Future and by a grant from 
the Texas Commission on the Arts and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, which 
believes that a great nation deserves great art. Visit Austin at NowPlayingAustin.com 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 33 








STYLE 



L’ARTISTE 

I can hardly remember last month’s 
Zombie Ball through the haze of medication, 
and at the time, I didn’t know exactly what 
would be occurring until it all happened. I was 
surprised and taken aback when I was award- 
ed the Frankenstein’s monster painting, and 
didn’t know anything about it, who did it, 
etc. So, this week, I heard from the 
artist who painted the piece. 

Artist Thad Morgan 
(Morgans Fine Art Studio 
on Facebook) created the 
work as a smaller version 


The finely crafted Frankenstein painting by 
Thad Morgan awarded to me at the Zombie Ball. 


of a very large monster. It was the style of his 
paintings that was so fascinating. The creator 
of what he calls Modern Fauvism, Morgan 
says that the style is “initally based on the 
specific ideal of the expressive use of bold, 
vibrant colours that celebrate spontaneity and 
vitality. I use the mobility, fluidity, and range of 
the weight that colours carry within their struc- 
tures collectively creating melodic 
harmony. But the true validity is 
the effect the work has on the 
emotions of the audience.” 
Frankly, talking about a 
painting without seeing it 
is like describing a 
dream. Was I shocked by 
the subject matter? No. It 
was campy and suited 
the occasion well. Did I 
have any idea of what I’d 
do with it? Not yet, but I’ve 
been trying to figure out how 
to make it work in my bedroom 
which I’ve decorated like a garage 
sale Versailles. None of it mattered 
until, in the light of day, the brushstrokes, tex- 
turing, and layering of the painting made it 
come alive. Vividly. Perhaps I should reconsid- 
er the Versailles theme and dedicate my bed- 
room to horror. But wait ... isn’t it already? 


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(l-r) Edith (Mrs. Darrell) Royal, Bobbie Nelson, and 
Susan Antone (sisters of Willie and Clifford, respectively) 
Help Clifford Help Kids. Literally. 


CLIFFORD’S 10TH 

To me, the perfect touch was the 
envelopes on the table containing 
cards designed and signed by stu- 
dents thanking us for contributions 
to their educations. It was a moving 
and personal touch that went far 
beyond the usual video and speech 
presentations at most benefits. But 
this 10th anniversary of Help 
Clifford Help Kids (I’ve been to 
them all) also celebrated 30 years 
of American YouthWorks, which 
means a lot to me. It’s certainly the 
kind of program that might have 
benefited me when I was struggling 
with staying in high school. Of 
course Clifford and Susan Antone’s connec 
tion with it made it a requirement on my annu- 
al social calendar. And it holds an especially 
dear spot, since my soldier boy nephew Tyler 
graduated from there. So even though I was 


feeling poorly and only stayed briefly, the ener- 
gy and goodwill of the evening made me want 
to stay all night. The tribute to the late Robin 
Shivers was particularly poignant. In fact, it 
was impressive to see how much support this 




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education program receives from the music 
community, with masters of ceremonies Jody 
Denberg and Andy Langer (along with 
KVUE’s Chief Meteorologist Mark Murray), as 
well as many music professionals like Bobbie 
Nelson, Roggie Baer, and Waterloo 
Records 7 John Kunz. Bob Schneider 
ended the evening with a set that had his 
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exactly what it sets out to do, with tangible 
results shown through the work of the stu- 
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38 THE BOXED-WINE CHALLENGE 40 LAVACA TEPPAN; THANKSGIVING FEASTS AROUND TOWN 



Beer Flights: Local Brews Make Good 


This fall was definitely the time for festivals and competitions, 
both in Texas and elsewhere. I can report from experience that 
the Texas Craft Brewers Festival, which returned in September > 
after a six-year hiatus, was a fantastic success, as was October’s 
Austin Beer Week. Events like these are far more than just an excuse 
to drink - they’re also about innovation and exploration, as many of the 
brewers unveiled new creations or brilliant cask-conditioned versions of 
old favorites. I’m already looking ahead to April 21, 2012, when the 
Central Texas Beer Festival is scheduled for the Austin Music Hall. 

The national scene has smiled kindly on Texas, as well. Texas winners 
from the granddaddy of them all, Denver’s Great American Beer Fest- 
ival, included: 

• Gold, American-style amber lager: Uberbrau, Humperdink’s Restau- 

rant and Brewery (Dallas) 

• Silver, English-style summer ale: Peacemaker, Austin Beerworks 

• Silver, kellerbier or zwickelbier: Bottle Rocket Lager, Uncle Billy’s 

Brew & Que Lake Travis (Austin) 

• Bronze, Belgian-style lambic or sour ale: Barton Kriek, North by 

Northwest Restaurant and Brewery (Austin) 

A GABF medal carries prestige, but even those professional brewers 


fLIGHT_ 

NICHOLS ^ 


might be envious of Corey Martin. 
The Round Rock home brewer was 
one of three winners in the 
Samuel Adams LongShot 
American Homebrew Contest - 
meaning his beer will be bottled 
and available nationally as part 
of the Samuel Adams 2012 
LongShot Variety Six-Pack, 
which hits shelves in February. 
His Dunkel-style beer is named A 
Dark Night in Munich because of a 
“staining” process in which he powdered 
roasted malts and added them early in the brew- 
ing. Martin no longer has to live in the shadow of his broth- 
er Kerry, who won a similar contest a few years ago spon- 
sored by Saint Arnold Brewing and had his beer featured 
as part of the Houston brewery’s Divine Reserve series. 

As part of the prize, Martin got to fly to Boston and brew 
alongside Sam Adams founder and superstar brewer Jim 
Koch. “The difference between craft brewers and home 
brewers is ambiguous; sometimes all they need is a shot,” 
said Koch. 

“It’s every home brewer’s dream to turn pro,” said 
Martin. “They’ll have my face on the six-pack carton. I 
don’t know if that’s good marketing.” 

Lee Nichols blogs about beer at www.i-love-beer.blogspot.com. 


Since fixing the state’s illogical 
and arbitrary beer laws failed at the 
Legislature this past spring, Jester King 
Brewery, Zax Restaurant, and distribu- 
tor Authentic Beverage Co. have taken 
the courtroom route. They filed suit 
against the Texas Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission in federal court alleging, 
among other things that laws that prevent 
microbreweries from selling on-site and 
brewpubs from selling off-site are dis- 
criminatory in favor of wineries and out-of- 
state brewpubs, laws that prohibit brew- 
eries from listing the alcohol content of 
their beers on the bottles violate the First 
Amendment, and laws that require beer 
with more than 4% alcohol to be labeled 
“ale” also violate the First Amendment 
and force breweries to describe their 
products misleadingly and incorrectly. For 
more, see “Speak No Ale: Beer Men Sue 
for Free Speech,” News, Oct. 28. 


Meal Times Nov. 18-20 

Photojournalist and Texas hambassador Rick 
Vanderpool will sign copies of his new paperback, 

The Texas Hamburger - History of a Lone Star 
Icon (History Press, 224 pp., $19.95), at Hut’s Ham- 
burgers (807 W. Sixth). Friday, Nov. 18, 5-7:30pm. 


> Casting producers from Fox TV’s Masterchef will 
audition home cooks interested in competing in the 
third season of Gordon Ramsey’s reality cooking 
show at Le Cordon Bleu (3110 Esperanza Crossing 
#100). Saturday, Nov. 19, 10am-6pm. 


Williams-Sonoma (9722 Great Hills 
Trail) presents a monthly artisans’ 
market featuring local food products. 
Saturday, Nov. 19, noon-4pm. 

> Green Gate Farm (8310 Canoga) 
hosts a Slow Food Feast benefiting 
the Austin Discovery School: a 
farm-sourced meal prepared by 
Barbara Frisbie of El Locavore and 
desserts from Arte de Chocolates. 
$125 per person/$100 vegetarian 
at www.slowfoodfeast.org or 674-0700. 
Saturday, Nov. 19, 6-9pm. 

> Chef du Cinema Ron Deutsch will pre- 
pare authentic fish and chips, accom- 
panied by a variety of condiments as 
well as lemon cake, to complement 

a screening of A Fish Called Wanda 
at Central Market Cooking School 
(4001 N. Lamar). $45 per person; 
reserve at 206-1014. Saturday, 

Nov. 19, 6:30-9:30pm. 


> Austin’s annual Empty Bowl Project benefit- 
ing the Kid’s Cafe of the Capital Area Food 
Bank takes place at the Marchesa Hall 
(6406 N. 1-35 #3100) with custom bowls cre- 
ated by local potters filled with delectable 
soups from some of Austin’s finest restau- 
rants. Order tickets at www.austinemptybowl.org. 
$75 for the preview party, Saturday, Nov. 19, 
6-9pm; $20 per bowl on Sunday, Nov. 20, 
llam-3pm. 

Learn to make a sculpted turkey cake at 

All in One Bake Shop (8566 Research), bene- 
fiting the Capital Confectioners. $55 covers 
the class and all supplies; reserve at 
371-3401. Sunday, Nov. 20, l-4pm. 

> Pastry chefs Philip Speer, Steven Cak, and Plin- 

io Sandalio team up to present the Dessert 
Project, a six-course sweet and savory dinner 
with wine pairings to benefit the Capital Area 
Food Bank, at parkside (301 E. Sixth). $90 
tickets at www.dessertprojectparkside.eventbrite. 
com. Sunday, Nov. 20, 7pm. - V.B.W. 


> Home Slice Pizza (1415 S. Congress) celebrates 
with the annual Carnival O’ Pizza benefiting Austin 
Bat Cave, a nonprofit that provides creative writing 
programs for Austin youth. The event includes plenty 
of pizza, beer, and live music, as well as a silent 
auction and raffle, a midway with carnival games, 
and contests for pizza-eating and dough-tossing, 
plus the Hands on an Eggplant Sub competition. 
Saturday, Nov. 19, noon-lOpm. 


food-o-file 

BY VIRGINIA B. WOOD 

JMueller BBQ (1502 S. First) is now open 
Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11am until it 
runs out of meat, and I finally managed to get 
there in time to try it a couple of weeks back. A 
friend and I shared the crispy ends of the last 
brisket, some sausage, and a short rib with sides 
of pinto beans and potato salad just before the 
meat ran out at 1:30pm on a Friday. The sides 
could have used more seasoning for me, but the 
beef was divine: The crispy brisket ends were 
spiced with a black-pepper rub with a layer of per- 
fectly caramelized fat just underneath the crunchy 
exterior, and the meat on the short rib was moist 
and succulent, pulling away from the bone with 
the slightest pressure. Make call-in orders 
(229-7366) to avoid the disappointment of being 
caught in line when the kitchen runs out of meat. 
My suggestion: Call ahead or go early, and don’t 
pass up those short ribs. 

The UT campus area is bustling with the open- 
ing of several new chain outlets, some national or 
regional, and a few homegrown. The old Varsity 
Theater (24th & Guadalupe) is now home to the 
second Austin locations of both Qdoba Mexican 
Grill and Noodles & Company. Qdoba offers 
California-influenced Mexican dishes made fresh 
when ordered; Noodles & Company features 
Asian, Mediterranean, and American noodle-based 
dishes, plus salads, sandwiches, and some local 
wines and beers... Look for the new breakfast, 
brunch, and lunch spot called Another Broken 
Egg Cafe (3016 Guadalupe), a Southern-based 
chain known for delicious, affordable breakfasts. 
Also on Guadalupe: two outlets of the homegrown 
Verts (Dobie Mall; 2530 Guadalupe) featuring 
Turkish-inspired doner kebap - a beef, chicken, or 
lamb wrap that’s a popular street food in Germany. 
A Verts food cart built on a tiny Smart car made 
its debut at last month’s Gypsy Picnic and now 
works the Downtown area... And finally, on Red 
River north of the law school, Jalapeno Joe’s 
Tex-Mex Bar & Grill (3211 Red River) is now 
serving affordable Tex-Mex and burgers in the for- 
mer Streat location. 

Kudos to members of the Austin chapter of Les 
Dames d’Escoffier, who raised $13,518 during 
their recent Food Fight! online fundraiser. The 
money will fund culinary scholarships for women 
and local farm-to-table initiatives. 

The folks at Casa Brasil (415 E. St. Elmo 
Ste. 4-A) now offer bike delivery of their fresh- 
roasted, direct-trade coffees in the Downtown 
area on Mondays and Tuesdays. To set up a deliv- 
ery schedule, call 407-9887. 

Although the water continues to vanish from Lake 
Travis, Oasis Texas (6550 Comanche Trail) offers a 
new water-based attraction with a 1,700-square-foot 
ice skating rink, open Saturday, Nov. 19, through 
Jan. 1. Sign up for now for ice skating lessons 
(761-5302) during the holiday season. 

In addition to H-E-B’s annual Feast of Sharing 
to feed the those in need - 4-8pm, Tuesday, Nov. 
22, at the Palmer Events Center on Lady Bird 
Lake - chef Jack Gilmore will team with Mobile 
Loaves & Fishes to provide a free Thanksgiving 
meal for Austin’s homeless at the First Baptist 
Church (901 Trinity) at 5pm the same day. 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER IS, 2011 the Austin chronicle 37 







OUR 2011 TOP 10 BOX WINES 

1 ) Jack Tone Vineyards Red Wine 17.2 

2 ) Big House Unchained Naked Chardonnay 16.6 

3 ) Patch Block Merlot 16.3 

4 ) Jack Tone Vineyards White Wine 15.7 

5 ) FishEye Shiraz 14.3 

6 ) Bota Box Chardonnay 14.0 

7 ) Big House Red 13.5 

8 ) Bota Box Cabernet Sauvignon 12.4 

9 ) Pinot Evil Pinot Grigio 11.9 

10 ) La Vieille Ferme Red 11.1 

SCALE 

19 - 20 : A world-famous wine maker is coming to 
dinner. 

16 - 18 . 9 : This is a candidate for my house wine. 

11 - 15 . 9 : Recommendable as a house wine 
for the general public 

6 - 10 . 9 : Nice pick for a party of 200 in 
your backyard 

0 - 5 . 9 : Plonk. Where’s the dump bucket? 


RECOMMENDABLE BOXES RANKED BY FLIGHT 

(Prices vary by as much as $5 a box depending on stores and sales.) 

Pinot Grigio 

Red Blends 

Syrah/Shiraz 

Pinot Evil ($23) 

Jack Tone Vineyards Red Wine 

FishEye ($20) 

Bota Box ($18) 

($20) 

Bota Box ($18) 

Chardonnay 

Big House Red ($20) 

La Vieille Ferme ($25) 

Bodegas Osborne Seven ($18) 

Winning Bottle Wines 

Big House Unchained Naked 
Chardonnay ($20) 

Freemark Abbey Chardonnay 
($25) 

Bota Box ($18) 

Merlot 

Chateau Ste. Michelle 

Black Box Wines ($24) 

Patch Block ($25) 

Midsummer’s White ($20) 

White Blenrlc 

Black Box Wines ($24) 

Laetitia Pinot Noir ($23) 

Will IV DICIIM9 

Jack Tone Vineyards White Wine 

Bota Box ($18) 

Freemark Abbey Merlot ($25) 
Chateau Montelena Cabernet 
Sauvignon ($43) 

Cline Syrah ($13) 

($20) 

Big House White ($22) 

Cabernet Sauvignon 

Bota Box ($18) 

Powers ($21) 

Black Box Wines ($24) 




Sipping From the 
Spigot, Vol. 2 

The second Great Boxed- Wine Challenge, 
plus a very important lesson 


BY WES MARSHALL 

We had 57 wines to taste and a crowd of 
distinguished tasters. The goal was to ferret 
out a few bag-in-a-box wines that are so 
good most of your friends would assume 
they were drinking high-quality bottled 
wine. Could any of the bag-in-a-box wines 
stand up to the judges’ keen tastes and beat 
the bottled wines? Would any boxed wine be 
good enough to be crowned monarch of the 
57 possibilities? 

Our interest in finding a good boxed wine 
is based on several goals. First and fore- 
most, who doesn’t love a great glass of inex- 
pensive wine? We were hoping to find a 
wine that played way above its class, one 
that could compete with much more expen- 
sive bottled wines. (Admittedly, it’s a bit like 
panning for gold, but one can always hope.) 
We were also hoping to find a great boxed 
wine because most people don’t finish every 
bottle of wine right away, and any partially 
consumed bottle of wine starts going bad 
the first night it sits. Given that bag-in-a-box 
wines are vacuum-sealed in inert plastics, 
an opened boxed wine will last much longer 
than an opened bottle of wine. In fact, it has 
been our experience that you can count on 
boxed wines lasting at least two weeks after 
you open them, sometimes longer. 

The Procedure 

The good news is one boxed wine did 
indeed reign supreme. But to understand 
what an incredible win that was, you have 
to understand our procedure. We had 15 
tasters. Among them were master sommel- 
iers, winemakers, winners of the Texas’ 
Best Sommelier Competition, restaurant 
owners, retailers, distributors, consumers, a 
radio host, and a writer. We tasted wine by 
varietal flights in this order: Pinot Grigio, 
Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, mixed 
whites, Pinot Noir, red blends and various 
reds, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and 
Syrah/Shiraz. Each flight included both 
bottled and boxed wines with the goal of 
keeping the tasters on their toes. They 
couldn’t say, “Well, it’s all right for a boxed 
wine,” because it might be a bottled wine. 
Some flights were just one bottle; some 
included as many as three. The wines were 
randomly ordered and completely unknown 
to both the tasting panel and the servers. 

Double-blind tests are the gold standard 
of product testing, so that’s how we set up 
our tasting. In order for a test to be double 
blind, neither the person tasting nor the 
person serving can know the identity of the 
wine, so we had one poor soul (my wife) 
pouring all those wines into pitchers, then 
two servers, Margaret Shugart and Martin 


Aechternacht, serving from those pitchers 
without knowing what they were pouring. 
The only labels used were the numerals 1-8 
on the pitchers and the glasses indicating a 
wine’s position in the flight. Each taster 
gave every wine in the flight a score, then 
went back and picked which wines placed 
first through fourth. The pourer kept track 
of the wines, and at the end of each round, 
Stephen Aechternacht added up the scores; 
only then did we reveal the wines. Then, at 
the end, we picked the two winners - red 
and white - for the entire contest. 

Despite keeping the wines a secret so the 
panel would never know if they were drink- 
ing a bottled wine or a boxed wine, with such 
an erudite tasting panel (see “The Panel,” 
p.39), most of the winners were wines in 
bottles. That is as it should be. The bottles 
ranged in cost to as much as $43 a bottle, 
while the average cost of a bottle’s worth of 
the boxed wines was about $5. One would 
hope that, at the price, the bottles would 
always win. But we wanted to pit the boxed 
wines against almost impossible odds to see 
if any would rise to the top. And one did. 

A Vitally Important Lesson 

As we tasted the wines, one problem 
reared its ugly head. After a few rounds, we 
were getting discouraged because so many 
of the wines tasted awful. This was unlike 
the last taste-off four years ago, when most 
of the wines were at least palatable. The big- 
gest problem was oxidation. Wine, when 
exposed to oxygen, basically rusts. It starts 
to taste old and worn out. Both white and red 
wines turn brown. This process starts the 
moment you uncork a bottle of wine. That’s 
why that bottle of Riesling that your granny 
has kept on her kitchen counter since last 
Thanksgiving now looks like motor oil. But 
we all thought one of the beauties of bag-in- 
a-box wine was that it resists damage from 
both light and oxygen. What happened? 

Luckily, Devon Broglie, a master sommel- 
ier who works for Whole Foods, had intimate 
experience with boxed wines. “We tried mak- 
ing box wines a few years ago in our Whole 
Foods 365 line and found out that these bags 
really are slightly permeable,” he said. “Oxy- 
gen does get in the wines, and they don’t last 
forever on the shelves.” Then he pointed us 
to the bottom of the boxes. Turns out all 
these box wines have a date on the bottom. 
The verbiage varies, but it will say some- 
thing like “packed on” or “freshest before.” 
Sure enough, the worst wines we tasted were 
also the oldest wines. Some Australian wines 
had been packed as far back as 2008, and 
they were uniformly undrinkable. On the 


38 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



THE PANEL Our panel of judges was about as good as they come. In alphabetical order by last name, we had: 


Stan Adams, owner of 
Siena Ristorante Toscana 
and three Brick Oven 
pizzerias 

Brenda Audino, corpo- 
rate wine manager and 
education director for 
Twin Liquors, a certi- 
fied wine specialist and 
accredited sommelier 
by the International 
Sommelier Guild 

Devon Broglie, master 
sommelier and coordina- 
tor of all specialty prod- 
ucts for Whole Foods 
Market’s Southwest 
region; Broglie also 
won the Texas’ Best 
Sommelier Competition 
in 2006 


Crutch Crutchfield, 

consumer and found- 
ing member of one of 
Austin’s oldest and most 
renowned tasting groups, 
the Original Zinners 

Lisa Fox, owner of Asti 
and Fino, both peren- 
nial Austin Chronicle 
Restaurant Poll favorites 

Dan Gatlin, owner and 
winemaker at Inwood 
Estates Vineyards, widely 
considered one of Texas’ 
top wineries 

Susan Gayle, consumer, 
self-anointed Queen of 
Spoons, host of Food 
Love Austin (Thursdays at 
2pm on KOOP 91.7FM), 
and expert on backyard 
chicken coops 


Wes Marshall, your 
current writer, a regular 
contributor to The Austin 
Chronicle , and author of 
What's a Wine Lover To 
Do? (Artisan) and The 
Wine Roads of Texas 
(Maverick) 

Don Pullum, owner of 
Akashic Vineyard and 
winemaker for Sandstone 
Cellars Winery, Torre di 
Pietra Winery, Junction 
Rivers Winery, and Pon- 
totoc Vineyard Winery; 
Edgar Cayce’s fifth 
cousin, thrice removed 

Dan Redman, wine bro- 
ker and owner of Mosaic 
Wine Group and Certified 
Specialist of Wine 


June Rodil, beverage 
director of Congress 
(including Second Bar + 
Kitchen, Bar Congress, 
and Congress), Texas’ 

Best Sommelier 2009, 
and a Wine & Spirits 
magazine Best New 
Sommelier 2011 

Darcy Sacks, manager 
at the Austin Wine 
Merchant, previously 
of the Wine and Food 
Foundation of Texas and 
Spicewood Vineyards 

Mark Sayre, sommelier for 
TRIO at the Four Seasons, 
Texas’ Best Sommelier 
2007, and a Wine & Spir- 
its magazine Best New 
Sommelier 2010; Mark was 
also the host of our event 


James Tidwell, master 
sommelier, beverage man- 
ager for the Four Seasons 
Resort and Club in Dallas, 
co-founder of the Texas 
Sommelier Conference 
and Texas Sommelier 
Association, certified wine 
educator and James 
Beard Foundation Award 
semifinalist in 2011 for 
Outstanding Wine Service 

Steve Tipton, consum- 
er and wine collector; in 
his spare time, he’s a 
board-certified attorney in 
personal injury trial law, 
civil appellate law, and 
workers’ compensation 
law 


other hand, the Black Box Chardonnay, my 
pick for best Chardonnay, had been packed 
on Aug. 18. It wasn’t even three months old. 

So how old is OK? I asked the crew at 
Bota Box, one of the other high-rating box 
wineries. They use the “freshest before” 
label, and the easy way with their system is 
to go back a year. If it says “freshest before 
November 17, 2012,” it was packaged on 
Nov. 17, 2011. Why a year? “Our Quality 
Control department has run extensive tests 
on the 3L package (i.e. box wine) which 
show that the wine stays fresh for 14 
months,” said Holly Evans, director of pub- 
lic relations. “However, we feel it best to be 
conservative and go with 12 months.” 
Broglie said that after Whole Foods’ testing 
of their wines, he preferred six months as 
the sell-by date. In either case, be aware of 
the age of your boxed wine before you buy. 
It turned out that the two best predictors of 
the quality of the wines were which compa- 
ny made them and the date on the bottom of 
the box. Interestingly, those two variables 
seemed to be interactive. We often liked 
specific brands because they were young. 

The Winners 

So who won? Congratulations for the top 
pick to the McManis family of Ripon, Calif. 
Their winery is about 80 miles east of San 
Francisco in warm central California. The 
McManises have been California farmers 
for generations, and it is nice to see a small- 
ish family business place at the top of our 
list, especially since the boxed-wine busi- 
ness is dominated by huge wineries. The 
McManises’ Jack Tone Vineyards Red Wine 
($20) was the clear competition winner. It’s 
a delicious combination of Syrah and Petite 
Sirah and was the only boxed wine to 
soundly defeat the bottled wines in its cat- 
egory What makes this victory even sweeter 
is that we sneakily threw three bottled 
wines into the eight-bottle flight, all of 
which retail for more than $20, and the Jack 
Tone Vineyards Red Wine still won. At the 
end, when we polled the panel, the 
McManises’ wine was almost unanimously 
picked as the winner of the entire tasting. 


Second place went to Big House’s 
Unchained Naked Chardonnay ($20), and it 
was just a squeak away from beating a quite 
expensive bottled wine. As you might guess 
by the name, this is a Chardonnay that is 
fermented and aged in stainless steel. The 
Big House winemakers use no oak barrels 
whatsoever, lending the wine a cleaner, 
more food-friendly flavor. This Soledad, 
Calif., winery is widely distributed, so it’s 
easy to find, and it turned out to be a high- 
ranking winery throughout. 

News You Can Use at the Store 

Our picks for the best brands overall are 
important to know, but equally important is 
the date on the bottom of the box. If any of 
these were packed, bottled, or otherwise 
placed in their containers more than six 
months ago, ask if you can return it if isn’t 
up to your standards. If it’s more than a 
year old, pass up even the best brands. 

Both of Jack Tone Vineyards’ wines, a 
white and a red, placed high enough that I 
can confidently recommend either. You 
could empty a bottle of $25-plus American 
red wine, fill it from the spigot with the 
Jack Tone red and serve it without anyone 
knowing the difference. The white is a 
blend of Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, and 
Muscat. It’s nicely aromatic and almost flo- 
ral smelling, quite nice for quaffing. Jack 
Tone wines are available at Whole Foods, 
some Twin Liquors locations, and Whip In. 

We also found that Big House wines and 
Bota Box wines were generally dependable. 
Bota’s Cabernet Sauvignon received good 
scores, as did its Pinot Grigio. In fact, Bota 
Box Cabernet beat our winner from last 
time, Powers 2003 Columbia Valley Cabernet 
Sauvignon. Big House’s Chardonnay obvi- 
ously scored high enough to be one of the 
winners, but we can also recommend its 
red. I personally liked the Black Box Wines 
Chardonnay because it was just slightly 
reminiscent of Chablis, though my col- 
leagues were less enamored. Both the Big 
House and Bota Box wines are widely avail- 
able at both fine wine shops and grocery 
stores all over town. 


Finally, Some Gratitude 

Putting on a tasting of this scale is never 
easy. I’d like to thank the Four Seasons 
Hotel and its staff for making this such a 
smooth-running operation. Sommelier 
Mark Sayre was in charge, and the whole 
process could not have been better. Every 
year, the Four Seasons does so much to help 
the food and wine industries in Austin, and 
it never gets enough credit, so a great big 
thank you. Thanks also to the tasting panel 
judges for their time and expertise. As I 
looked around at the brain power, I felt a 
sense of pride in what has happened in 
Texas’ wine world over the last decade. We 
have so many people to be proud of. Finally, 
thanks to our servers, Margaret Shugart 
and Martin Aechternacht, both of whom 
could have been making money but instead 
helped us. Thanks to Emily for pouring and 
keeping track, and to Martin’s father, 
Stephen, for keeping score. ■ 



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REVIEWS 


Lavaca Teppan 

1712 Lavaca, 520-8630 
Monday-Saturday , llam-9pm 

Tucked into the quiet, unassuming stretch 
of Lavaca Street that bridges Downtown and 
the University is an old-school teppanyaki res- 
taurant that offers just as much a feast for 
the eyes as for the appetite. Opened quietly in 
July, Lavaca Teppan is the new venture by 
Toshiyuki and Yoko Niizeki, who once 
owned a Japanese steak house in San Angelo, 
Texas, and their son Taichi, a recent graduate 
of Le Cordon Bleu here in Austin. Designed by 
Jamie Chioco - the architect responsible for 
other sleek, modern spaces such as Galaxy 
Cafe and Perla’s - the restaurant is worth a 
visit for the space alone. The attention to 
detail is deeply impressive, the gray-and-yel- 
low palette woven subtly through the restau- 
rant from the light fixtures to the thread on 
the banquette cushions. A translucent wall 
filled with Japanese salt divides the room, and 
the seating is minimalist yet comfortable. Such 
an elegant and beautifully designed space 
might suggest an upscale dining experience, 
but in reality, Lavaca Teppan is quite accessi- 
ble thanks to both its menu and its prices. 

We made our first visit during lunch hour 
on a Wednesday, the restaurant comfortably 
full but not so busy that we weren’t seated 
right away. We started with the edamame 
appetizer ($3.25) and house soup ($2.75). 
The soup was a tasty blend of beef broth, 


mushrooms, scallions, and tempura flakes; 
the edamame was cold and came without an 
extra dish for the husks. We also got the 
beef tataki appetizer ($9.25) from the dinner 
menu, eight beautifully seared slices of filet 
mignon with a light, refreshing dipping sauce; 
it was easily the most popular dish on this 
visit. While the nicely cooked teriyaki beef 
($9.75) and shrimp stir-fry ($9.75) were fine, 
the tempura don (six pieces of tempura 
shrimp and vegetables served atop a bed of 
steamed rice; $8.50) was lukewarm and a bit 
soggy. Worse, though, was the shrimp salad 
($7.75), six salty shrimp pieces resting on a 
stingy portion of iceberg lettuce mix. While 
the sweet ginger dressing was delicious, the 
salad itself lacked cohesion. All of the entree 
bowls come with a universal vegetable mix of 
carrots, zucchini, mushrooms, and onion; the 
accompanying rice is perfectly cooked. 

I took my family with me on my second visit, 
curious to see how well the restaurant accom- 
modates children. I was surprised to find the 
place nearly deserted on a Saturday evening, 
with only one other table occupied. Our server, 
who happened to be Taichi Niizeki himself, 
explained that business is most brisk during 
weekday lunches. Ironically, the food on this 
visit was markedly improved from my previous 
lunch. We started with the tempura ($7) and 
the tori kara ($5.50), a large serving of 
Japanese-style chicken nuggets lightly breaded 
with potato starch. Our food arrived hot and 
fresh, the tempura batter crisp and delicately 



flavored. Our son, a shrimp lover, claimed fully 
half of the shrimp tempura on offer, leaving his 
father and me with the lion’s share of the veg- 
etables. For entrees we ordered a bowl of the 

vegetable soup with tofu ($5.50), the tori 
kara don ($7.95), and the beef stir-fry 

($9.75). The soup is a larger portion of the 
house soup with added carrots and zucchini 
served with a shaker of Japanese chili powder 


called nanami togarashi, enabling diners to 
spice the soup to their liking. The tori kara 
don, a deconstructed frittata of sorts with 
fried chicken pieces on a layer of fried egg 
over a bed of steamed rice, is a very filling por- 
tion of protein that wants only a bit of moisture 
(perhaps a splash of the tataki sauce?). My 
husband’s beef stir-fry was simple, fresh, and 
flavorful. Yoko Niizeki was working the kitchen 


Thanksgiving Feasts Around Town 


HOTELS 

The Driskill Hotel The famous brunch tradition continues, with multiple seat- 
ings between 10am and 2:30pm. This is a popular event, so be sure to 
reserve early. Downstairs, the 1886 Cafe & Bakery will offer a seasonal menu 
for lunch and dinner, llam-lOpm. Reservations are a must later in the day for 
the five-course prix fixe at the Driskill Grill, serving 3-8pm. Brunch: $62; ages 
2-12, $31; under 2, free. Cafe: $25. Grill: $75. 604 Brazos, 391-7039 for 
reservations, www.driskillgrill.com. 

TRIO at the Four Seasons offers a bountiful holiday repast: llam-6pm in the 
Four Seasons ballroom foyer, or llam-8pm in the restaurant. 

Ballroom: $68; ages 6-12, $20; 5 and under, free. TRIO: $75; 
ages 6-12, $20; 5 and under, free. 98 San Jacinto, 

685-8300. www.triorestaurantaustin.com. 

Omni Hotel Downtown serves a traditional Thanksgiving 
brunch in Ancho’s; enjoy bottomless mimosas for 
a small extra charge. llam-4pm. $38; 65 and 
older, $32; ages 6-12, $16; 5 and under, free. 

700 San Jacinto, 476-3700. 

Omni Hotel Southpark offers seating in the Onion 
Creek Grille for a full brunch buffet with carving stations 
and the traditional Thanksgiving spread. Reservations 
suggested. llam-2pm. $36; seniors, $31; ages 6-13, 

$15; under 6, free. 4140 Governor’s Row, 448-2222. 

Renaissance Austin Hotel Banderas - A Texas Bistrot invites 
you to a special, plated Thanksgiving brunch with seatings at 
10:30am and 12:30pm, or a special evening repast from 5 to 9:30pm. 
Reservations suggested. Brunch: $28.95; ages 5-12, $12. 9721 Arboretum 
Blvd., 795-6100 for reservations. 

Hyatt Regency Austin SWB - Southwest Bistro is serving a decadent buffet 
with free-flowing Champagne as well as contemporary cuisine and traditional 
favorites. llam-4:30pm. $54; ages 5-12, $27; under 5, free. 208 Barton 
Springs Rd., 480-2035 for reservations. 

Trace at the W Hotel offers a farm-to-table, three-course prix fixe menu. 
ll:30am-9pm. $49; under 12, $19. 200 Lavaca , 542-3660. 

www.traceaustin.com. 


RESTAURANTS AND THE REST 

Cannoli Joe’s will have buffets featuring turkey cacciatore, roasted acorn 
squash, and sausage gravy. Reservations recommended. llam-7pm. $17.99; 
ages 4-12, $5.99; 3 and under, free. 10am-7pm. 4715 Hwy. 290 W., 
892-4444. www.cannolijoes.com. 

Carmelo’s will be open llam-lOpm, offering both its standard fare and a 
$19 turkey special. 504 E. Fifth , 477-7497. www.carmelosrestaurant.com. 
The Carillon Executive Chef Josh Watkins' buffet for the big day includes a cold 
seafood station, charcuterie and cheese boards, carving stations, and, of course, 
the usual fresh entrees, sides, and desserts. Also available: gluten-free 
entrees. 10am-3pm. $55; kids, $16. 1900 University Ave., 
404-3655. Email thecarillon@attconf.utexas.edu for 
reservations, www.thecarillonrestaurant.com. 

Corazon at Castle Hill will offer a three-course prix fixe menu 
and choices for kids. Go traditional or try the roasted turkey 
breast with a Oaxacan mole accompanied by a corn pudding 
tamale. Noon-4pm. $29.95. 1101 W. Fifth , 476-0728. 
www.corazonatcastlehill.com. 

Cru offers a three-course prix fixe for your family from noon 
to 9pm. In addition to the bird, you might be interested in 
the rack of lamb or the pan-seared salmon. $35; under 12, 
$17.50. 238 W. Second, 472-9463. www.cruawinebar.com. 
Hoover’s Cooking is celebrating with a prix fixe menu: Choose one 
of six main dishes, two sides, and, of course, get all the trimmings. 
First come, first served. Also, full family or individual meals for takeout. 
llam-7pm. $16.99. 2002 Manor Rd., 479-5006. www.hooverscooking.com. 
Hudson’s on the Bend will offer a special a la carte menu including signature 
dishes from its fall menu, plus special holiday options and a childen’s menu. 
Seatings are limited, so reserve early. llam-3pm, 6-9pm. 3509 RR 620 N., 
266-1369. www.hudsonsonthebend.com. 

Hyde Park Bar & Grill continues a long tradition at both locations with an oven- 
roasted turkey dinner and all the sides for $16.95, or a vegetarian option featuring 
meatless cornbread dressing and gravy for $12.95. llam-7pm. Kids 10 and under, 
$10.95. 4206 Duval St., 458-3168; 4521 West Gate Blvd., 899-2700. 

www.hpbng.com. 


La Madeleine invites you to sit down with a turkey-cranberry risotto or an indi- 
vidual pumpkin pie, or take home a family feast to serve six to eight. Various 

locations, www.lamadeleine.com. 

Lakeway Resort and Spa will host a day featuring chef Jeff Axline's brunch, 
panoramic views, and a petting zoo for the tots. Roast turkey, braised short 
ribs, pan-roasted salmon, and roasted pork loin. 10:30am-3pm. $49.95; ages 
3-12, $16.50. 101 Lakeway Dr., 261-7379 for reservations. 

www.lakewayresortandspa.com. 

Mansion at Judges’ Hill weighs in with yet another elegant Thanksgiving 
three-course prix fixe menu, but this year sides will be served family-style. 
Service in both the ballroom and Mansion dining room, llam-7 :45pm. 
$39.50; children, $17.50. 1900 Rio Grande , 495-1857. 

www.mansionatjudgeshill.com. 

Mirabelle Restaurant This eclectic bistro will have surprises in store on a 
special Thanksgiving menu, but if you have your favorites, the regular selec- 
tions will be available as well. llam-3pm. 8127 Mesa Ste. A100, 346-7900. 

www.mirabellerestaurant.com. 

PoK-e-Jo’s Smokehouse serves up all of your holiday favorites again this year. 
Or stay home and serve cornbread dressing, gravy, green bean casserole, 
baked potato casserole, cranberry relish, rolls, and tea for as little as $10.29 
per guest. Various locations, www.pokejos.com. 

Shoreline Bar & Grill If you’re tired of buffets and prix fixe menus, opt for this 
concise Thanksgiving menu with a nice variety of a la carte choices. 
llam-4pm. 98 San Jacinto, 477-3300. www.shorelinegrill.com. 

Threadgill’s never lets us down for down-home cooking; this year it offers a 
select menu with all the trimmings at both locations. Full family or individual 
meals and dishes are also available for takeout. 10:30am-10pm. 6416 N. 
Lamar, 451-5440; 301 W. Riverside, 472-9304. www.threadgills.com. 

Ill Forks will serve a four-course prix fixe menu with choice of slow-roasted 
turkey, tenderloin, or salmon. llam-8pm. $42.95; under 12, $14.95. 

Ill Lavaca, 474-1776. www.iiiforks.com. 

24 Diner serves it up family-style at your table with a choice between a spe- 
cial holiday menu and/or the regular, table-groaning selection, all day and all 
night, just like the name promises. $24. 600 N. Lamar , 472-5400. 

www.24diner.com. 

The City of Austin will host various community dinners at a minimal per-plate 
cost at various neighborhood recreation centers through Nov. 22; check online 
for more info, www.austintexas.gov/parks/thanksgiving.htm. 



40 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 




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At the end of the meal, we treated our chil- 
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56 FILM LISTINGS 



Making Love and War 

LOVE IS A BATTLEFIELD IN THE COMEDIES OF REMARRIAGE 

by Kimberley Jones 


When the Austin Film Society’s longtime, indispensable pro- 
grammer Chale Nafus asked me nine months ago to guest- 
curate an Essential Cinema program, I was over the moon. 
This series, its topic - really, this tiny but mighty obsession of 
mine - had been gurgling around my brain for years before I 
even knew what to call it. The comedy of remarriage, it turns 
out. Philosopher Stanley Cavell was the 
first to coin the term in his 1981 book 
Pursuits of Happiness, but I’m not going 
to push you to pick up your own copy. 

(Let’s just say it reads, quite accurately, 
like it was written by a philosopher.) 

Cavell’s book restricts itself to the screw- 
ball comedies of the Thirties and early 
Forties, and certainly a whole series 
could’ve been built around curling up to 
those classics. But the essential idea 
- that of couples who break up in the 
first reel and spend the rest of the film 
scrapping their way back together - is 
one that’s been regularly revived over the decades and refit- 
ted to reflect each era’s social and marital mores. 

In the last nine months, I’ve written short descriptions of 
the five films I selected for the series, then longer descrip- 
tions, then even chunkier program notes - upward of 10,000 
words, I’d wager. When I sat down to write this piece for the 
Chronicle, I wondered if I had any words left. And then I real- 
ized that, for all the tidbits about Cary Grant’s reluctant comic 
persona in The Awful Truth and Preston Sturges’ pr e-Palm 
Beach Story career as the inventor of kiss-proof lipstick, 
screenwriter George Axelrod’s acid-tongued anti-marriage itch 
in Phffft! and Two for the Road's oh-so-continental attitudes 
about infidelity and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind’s 
sci-fi/philosophic spin of the wheel, I’d never really gotten 
around to talking about what magnetized me in the first place 
to this peculiar subgenre of a larger genre so sniffed upon. 

Nobody looks to romantic comedy for truth. It’s a make- 
believe place where silly constructs such as mistaken identi- 


AFS ESSENTIAL 
CINEMA 

AND IT FEELS SO GOOD: 

THE COMEDIES OF REMARRIAGE 

Nov. 22: The Awful Truth (1937) 
Nov. 29: The Palm Beach Story (1942) 
Dec. 6: Phffft! (1954) 

Dec. 13: Two for the Road (1967) 
Dec. 20: Eternal Sunshine of the 
Spotless Mind (2004) 


ties, missed phone calls, and overcooked misunderstand- 
ings all conspire to keep lovers apart until the final reel, 
when they go skipping off into happily ever after. (Don’t get 
me wrong: I love the genre dearly.) 

But the comedies of remarriage begin at the end, when 
the shine has rubbed off - when happily ever after has 

gone belly-up and man and wife have 
devolved into squabbling and battle- 
scars, their once shared ideals now 
undone by miscommunication and 
anxieties. This is sounding like a 
downer, isn’t it? I swear it’s not. 
Because the marvelous thing about 
these comedies of remarriage is that, 
even with a central thesis that love is 
hell, each of these films, plucked from 
different decades, winds up at the 
same conclusion with a shrug and a 
smile: Love is hell, sure, but you 
might as well have a sense of humor 
about it, right? It’s all still some beautiful make-believe, 
but this is the kind of make-believe that makes you believe 
it’s worth the fight. ■ 

The AFS Essential Cinema series runs Tuesdays , 7pm , at the Alamo 
Drafthouse South (1120 S. Lamar). For film descriptions and ticket info , 
visit www.austinfilm.org. 


To Preserve 
and Project 

MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVISTS IN ACTION 

Conventioneers aren’t exactly rare birds in Austin, but the 
ones wandering the streets this weekend may look a little dif- 
ferent, with necks permanently cricked upward - not to the 
sky, but to the big screen. They are members of the 
Association of Moving Image Archivists, whose jobs are to 
preserve, to project, to educate, and to inspire - and if I 
sound a little holy about it all, well: How many of your memo- 
ries revolve around movies? That’s what I thought. 

More than 600 archivists will attend this year’s AMIA con- 
ference, held Nov. 16-19 at the Hyatt Regency, and will 
include representatives from the Austin-based Texas Archive 
of the Moving Image. (Incidentally, TAMI founder and 
University of Texas professor Caroline Frick begins her two- 
year term as AMIA’s next president this weekend.) The confer- 
ence itself is closed-door, but what’s wide open to the general 
public is a handful of free events that get at the heart of 
what the archivist association is about. 

On Friday, Nov. 16, at 9:30pm, Austin artists Barna Kantor 
and Scott Spark present Seeding the Clouds: Film on Fog at 
the Town Lake Gazebo, where the pair will “point their 16mm 
projectors at billowing clouds of pure cold steam.” (They 
encourage the audience to bring their own reels for exhibition.) 

Then on Saturday, AMIA takes up residency at the Paramount 
Theatre for an eclectic and entirely free day of programming, 
starting at 9am with a screening of We Can’t Go Home Again, 
Nicholas Ray’s experimental last film (see “We Can’t Go Home 
Again,” Aug. 5). At 10:45am, Mary Ellen Bute’s Passages From 
James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake (1966) screens (Roger Ebert 
called it “an essential film for readers of Joyce and an interest- 
ing film for the rest”), followed by a 1pm program called Amateur 
Night: Home Movies From the American Archives. At 3pm, the 
newly restored 1977 documentary Word Is Out: Stories of Some 
of Our Lives plays; it’s notable for being the first doc about 
gay and lesbian identity, made by gay and lesbian filmmakers. 
Finally, at 8pm, the Paramount does the time warp to 1937 
with cartoons, trailers, a short film, and a new (and hardly seen 
yet) restoration of the Technicolor screwball comedy Nothing 
Sacred starring Carole Lombard and Fredric March. - KJ. 



WEB EXTRA 

KEVIN SORBO, CHEWBACCA, AND COSPLAY APLENTY: 
SNAPSHOTS FROM WIZARD WORLD 2011 

Last weekend, the Austin Convention Center was stormed by thousands of fans 
of comic books and pop culture (including at least one storm trooper, pictured 
here) for the annual Wizard World convention, also known as Austin Comic Con. 
Visit austinchronicle.com/pip for our photo gallery from the three-day event. 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 43 






Game Changer 

How Austin’s indie gaming scene got cooking as 
Juegos Rancheros 


BY JAMES RENOVITCH 

The applause at the HighBall rings a bit 
too polite following a trailer for local studio 
LightBox Interactive’s upcoming release 
for PlayStation3. There are hulking figures 
on what looks like an oil rig in outer space, 
littered with explosions and futuristic fly- 
ing contraptions. Impressive stuff, to be 
sure, but far from what this audience is 
used to seeing at the indie gaming meetings 
for Juegos Rancheros. 

The trio from LightBox segues from a 
discussion of their upcoming console jug- 
gernaut, Starhawk, to a discussion of how 
their work on smaller projects keeps them 
from drowning creatively in the obsessively 
detailed minutiae that come hand in hand 
with a big-budget release. Afterward, 
attendees play the games and celebrate the 
birthday of Juegos’ unofficial generalissimo 
and Karakasa Games founder Wiley Wiggins 
with cupcakes. The two other founders 
include chair of the Independent Games 
Festival Brandon Boyer and Semi Secret 
Software co-founder Adam Saltsman. 

It’s these smaller passion projects that 
resonate with attendees of the monthly 
open meetings of Austin’s indie gaming 
culture collective. The drinking, presenta- 
tions, and schmoozing are one of the first 
manifestations of a scene that has only 
recently blipped onto the Austin arts radar 
- well, “recently” at least when compared to 
the rise of the local independent film and 
music scenes. 

There is an argument, however, that the 
independent spirit of Austin gaming cul- 
ture started in 1980 with a teenage Richard 
Garriott selling floppy discs of his game 
Akalabeth in Ziplocs and continued with 


his company Origin. Boyer drops some 
names from Austin’s gaming lore: “Warren 
Spector, Harvey Smith, and Randy Smith - 
those people were crazy PC guys doing 
really neat stuff, and then that all just shut 
down.” As business-types realized that 
games were not just a phase but a profitable 
art form, by most accounts the bulk of inde- 
pendent spirit fell to the wayside as large 
studios began vacuuming up the artistic 
and programming talent here and else- 
where. “Game culture in the sense that 
we’re interested in was not being created or 
engaged with at all,” says Saltsman. 

Just like the overproduction of disco in the 
late Seventies spawned the backlash that was 
punk, the inflated studio system birthed from 
the tech bubble of the Nineties created perfect 
conditions for a rise of agile “garage” pro- 
grammers to design games not from a profit- 
ability matrix but a desire to create something 
that resonates with them and hopefully at 
least a small audience. This trend grew 
throughout the latter half of the Aughties. 

But as developers left larger studios to go 
out on their own or started small studios, a 
sense of community didn’t automatically 
solidify around them. Even with the grow- 
ing reputations of Semi Secret Software, 
Tiger Style Games, Renegade Kid, and oth- 
ers, the scene consisted of only a few half- 
successful initiatives. Wiggins’ Austin 
Creative Code group was intended to bring 
artists and technical people together for the 
purposes of making digital multimedia 
experiments, but by his own admission the 
group “attracted a bunch of electronics hob- 
byists who scared off the traditional artists.” 
And Saltsman’s twice-yearly gathering of 




.(Ijr) Wiley Wiggins 
Brandon Boyer, and 
Adam Saltsman of 
.jJuegos Rancheros 




developers over sushi didn’t quite constitute 
the beginnings of a movement, either. 

When global indie-gaming czar Boyer 
moved to town, a group of indies and larger, 
like-minded studios started meeting more 
regularly over drinks at the Liberty, thus 
starting a tiny snowball’s descent down the 
hill. (I know what you’re thinking: “Global 
indie-gaming czar? Really?” If you don’t 
believe me, this guy asked for $50,000 to 
Kickstart his gaming culture website Venus 
Patrol a few months back. He made that in 
24 hours and proceeded to get double the 
amount. So, yes, czar.) Boyer wanted to 
make the meetings something more formal, 
but he admits, “I didn’t know how to get a 
venue or where the money would come 
from for a venue like that or how many 
people would come.” 

Like so many good things in Austin, it 
took a call from Tim League to get the ball 
rolling in earnest. Looking for a way to 
extend the brand of the Fantastic Fest’s 
gaming arm year-round, League contacted 
Boyer, who reimagined the event with its 
own identity while keeping the association 
with the Drafthouse and Fantastic Arcade. 
One inspired pun later, and Juegos 
Rancheros was born this past May. 

Juegos eschews the game industry meet- 
up model, opting instead to focus on the 
culture of gaming. The former dwells on 
tech and business, while the latter is more 
interested in the art and craft of play. 
Guests at Juegos Rancheros have included 
local developers like Twisted Pixel, which 
showed off its motion-sensor-controlled 
game Gunstringer, and Tiger Style Games, 
which showed off part-action game, part- 
planet-reviving simulator Waking Mars. In 
a well-attended meet-up, the creator of 
Cartoon Network’s cult hit Adventure Time 
joined the designers behind the interactive 
landscapes of Sword & Sworcery EP and 
chatted via the Internet about creative and 
professional topics before devolving into a 
contest of video-effects brinkmanship in a 
good balance of artistic insight and slap- 
stick comedy. 


Even as attendance grows each month, 
Juegos’ goals are loftier than just regular 
drinks with kindred spirits. “We’ve been 
able to get people from big studios and 
people from tiny studios sitting down 
together eating burritos and talking about 
stuff, and that just seems good in the long 
term,” says Saltsman. “I don’t know if we’ve 
been able to get as many non-video-game 
people to come as we’d hoped initially, but 
we’re still working on that.” 

One particularly successful meeting 
included playing an as-yet-unreleased 
game called Johann Sebastian Joust that 
isn’t technically a video game since no 
screen is necessary to play. The game is 
simple: Grab your motion-sensing control- 
ler, pull the trigger to signify that you are 
ready to play, and keep your “jousting” 
hand from moving too quickly or you’ll be 
out. Of course you will be encouraging 
your opponents to jostle their controllers 
and get eliminated. “ Joust is kind of the 
poster child for introducing people to 
indie games,” Wiggins says to explain its 
allure. “You can see the whole game right 
there physically, and it immediately makes 
sense.” As Juegos attendees played, Joust 
managed to entice the tastemaking and 
often difficult-to-impress waitstaff at the 
HighBall, who were soon lining up to 
show their skills. Getting Austin to rethink 
the definition of a video game is step one 
in an ongoing attempt to encourage the 
local nongaming population to consider 
interactive media as something within 
their artistic purview. 

Much like the Fantastic Arcade, Juegos 
Rancheros wants to introduce film people 
to the similarly multidisciplinary world of 
gaming. In the great Venn diagram of the 
arts, what’s needed to make a game over- 
laps largely with the skills involved in 
making a film (e.g., music, animation, 
voice acting, script writing). Despite 
efforts to shed the classification of game 
development as code jockeying, it can be 
difficult to proselytize to the somewhat 
insular film community. 


44 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



Allow Saltsman to elaborate in the form 
of a movie pitch: “I always imagine us in 
some weird dystopic sci-fi movie that hap- 
pens in a hole. You can’t see out of the hole, 
so you don’t know they are in a perfectly 
normal place. They’re this savage primitive 
society in a hole, but if we could climb 
slightly higher, we could see a house 10 feet 
away. That’s the twist, we’re in the backyard 
the whole time.” In other words (I think), 
the local arts community is the “water, 
water everywhere” and only now is the 
gaming community realizing it can drink 
from the larger artistic community that 
makes Austin what it is. 

Leah Smith, the animation and video- 
game industries liaison at the Texas Film 
Commission, has seen increasing interest 
from film and music professionals looking 
to make inroads into interactive art forms 
like gaming. She’s also taken the reins of 
Juegos Rancheros’ first community out- 
reach project. OK, maybe not a community 
outreach project per se, but rather a kickass, 
free-to-play arcade cabinet stuffed with 
indie gaming goodness (which, truth be told, 
is currently housed in this very writer’s 
kitchen). To date, the Texatron, as it has 
come to be known, has had all of its compo- 
nents donated and is soon to be assembled 
by a crack team of amateur volunteers 
under the tutelage of a professional. If 
things go according to plan, once the long- 
horns are affixed to the top of the Texatron 
it will likely be placed in Domy Books, ready 
to shun your quarters and show Austin what 
noncommercial games look like. 

The Juegos Rancheros jefes hope to 
expand into actual community outreach 
with a program similar to Toronto’s 
Difference Engine, which empowers under- 
represented groups to make games that 
reflect their perspectives. That may still be 
a ways off, but the HighBall meetings were 
never intended to be the end all be all of 
Juegos. Ideally, the meetings will reach a 
critical mass that leads to joint efforts and 
unexpected professional pairings. “I think 
people who come into games from another 
discipline are where great stuff comes 
from,” says Wiggins. “It’s the same with 
film. When you get people who are [Radio - 
Television-Film] majors, you get the same 
film over and over again, but when you get 
a magician or a photographer or a puppe- 
teer, it’s a different story.” 

The conclusion of the LightBox panel is 
accompanied by earnest applause as the 
roughly 50 Juegoers break up into groups 
of conversation. Darwin, a UT freshman, 
politely asks if these events are always so 
informal. The answer is yes, but regardless 
of his first impression, Darwin asks how 
he can help with the Texatron, and that 
marks an unmitigated success. Juegos 
Rancheros has always been more interest- 
ed in getting people involved than impress- 
ing people with their professionalism. 
What kind of legitimate cultural move- 
ment starts with an impeccable PowerPoint 
presentation, anyway? ■ 

If you want to see the action in person, Juegos Rancheros’ 
next meeting is Saturday, Dec. 10, at the HighBall. Go to 
www.juegosrancheros.com/or more info and other updates. 


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46 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







mi 


UME 


MUSIC LISTINGS 


uit*nmmnimrL' 



ttSwEwttS 1 


yi,I BRAMHAU 



Lives Well Spent 


The subject Saturday morning was music and 
motherhood, as decreed by Carla DeSantis 
Black, notorious mover and shaker of Rockrgrl 
magazine and founder of Seattle’s Rockrgrl 
Music Conference. Now relocated to Austin, 
she’s wasted no time stirring things up with 
her Musicians for Equal Opportunities for 
Women conference at Momo’s, and wrangled 
onstage Sara Hickman, Elizabeth 
McQueen, and Shelley King, with me 
as moderator. 

If I had any hesitation as 
nonmother, it was brushed 
aside by the endless sto- 
ries the three women 
told: the joy of lactating 
onstage or being the 
lone pregnant female in 
a large male band. King 
described a male fan 
hesitant to approach the 
merch table because she 
was breast-feeding. 

“Listen,” the singer-song- 
writer confided to him in a no- 
bullshit tone, “after I get done selling 
CDs and feeding, I have to go onstage and 
sing. If you want my autograph, get it now.” 

DeSantis booked the afternoon full of 
other panels and topics, so we wrapped up 
with audience commentary from veteran rock- 
er Patti Quatro (see “The Pleasure 
Seekers,” July 29), who verbally high-fived 
King. Had we talked longer, the topics surely 
would have wound around to our own moth- 
ers, almost uniformly supportive of the 
unconventional paths their daughters took. 


r 1,2, y 
f TRES, ^ 
CUATRQ 

* BY MARGARET "■ 


MOSER 


As Sarah Elizabeth Campbell said of her 
own mother who’d recently died, “Two musi- 
cians for kids couldn’t have been easy.” 
Sudie Campbell “traveled to festivals 
[and] gigs all over, and [was] a total regular at 
Artz [Rib House] and Donn’s [Depot] every 
Monday for many, many years,” says Sarah. 
Though Sudie later followed her daughter and 
sometimes her son, guitarist Bill Campbell, 
as a young couple she and husband 
William Wallace Campbell 
waltzed across Texas to hear 
the touring dance bands. 
Sarah claims she was con- 
ceived in San Antonio after 
a Harry James dance; 

Bill recalls being set 
onstage “between the 
stand-up bass and trom- 
bone player for the entire 
first set” of a Les Blume 
Swing Band show. 

Bill Campbell still ranks as 
one of Austin’s finest blues gui- 
tarists, maybe the most uncelebrat- 
ed considering his own remarkable his- 
tory as the “token white boy” in many of the 
Eastside’s best bands of the 1960s. He was 
the hometown guitarist sought by the Vaughan 
brothers when they relocated here in the early 
1970s, and Gary Clark Jr. was wise enough 
to work with him early in his career. Bill, like 
Austin singer Shirley Ratisseau, played color- 
blind at a time when being the lone white in a 
black band came with different rules. 

Bill’s younger sibling Sarah didn’t follow the 
road their older sister Marge did. Marge was 


a drum major in high school in the 1960s, but 
Sarah heard the siren call of the muse while 
Marge had the family grandbabies. Sarah 
migrated to California, playing festivals and 
cruises in string bands, and “the distance of 
mother-daughter angst started to smooth.” It 
smoothed into maternal pride by the time 
Sarah moved back to Austin in 1989. 

“It’s hard to remember a gig she missed,” 
wrote Sarah, planning a memorial for her 
mother on Nov. 28 at the Veterans Hall. 
“Always at Bummer Night at La Zona Rosa 
and after Gordon [Fowler] and Marcia [Ball] 
sold La Zona, Artz became her second home 
on Monday’s. She loved the music and all the 
‘young people.’ Unless she was really ill, she 
was there. After Artz, we would make the trek 
to Donn’s Depot where her table was set, 
waiting with her cup of cocktail cherries and 
juice with fruit sticking out all over it like a 
boat drink.” 

When life is young and its promise bright, 
parents aren’t really in the picture, just paint- 
ed in the background. As we age, they once 
again occupy more space, more effort in our 
lives, perhaps living with us again, as my 
mother does with me. That wasn’t anything I 
planned; it just happened that way after my 
stepfather died in 2005. It meant many 
changes, some I’m still adjusting to. 



One of our rituals is monthly trips to the 
hair salon, an event she would like to sched- 
ule more often and I less. For most of the 
last five years, Brandi Cowley has done my 
hair. Besides all the chitchat and catch-up, 
I’ve also enjoyed the charming friendship of 
Georgia Bramhall, the stylist who worked 
alongside Brandi until opening her own 
salon, Honeycomb. 

As word of her father Doyle Bramhall 
Sr.’s death went out Sunday, Georgia’s 
name wasn’t even mentioned in some 
reports. Perhaps it’s because her brother 
Doyle II has emerged in the spotlight as a 
guitar superstar every bit as talented as 
his father’s friend and co-author Stevie 
Ray Vaughan. The elder Bramhall, who 
died at 62, enjoyed as successful a life as 
can be had from music - critical acclaim, 
personal satisfaction, monetary reward, the 
Grammy nomination - while DB II is making 
his mark playing with Eric Clapton and 
Roger Waters. He’s come a long way from 
passing tip jars. 

Given the choice about when to check 
out, Big Doyle probably wouldn’t have 
picked now. He’d had serious, recurring 
bouts of hepatitis C when we’d spoken for a 
Chronicle cover story (see “Life by the 
Drop,” Feb. 21, 2003), but his artistry still 
thrived. His legacy is life by the drop. 

When the Austin Music Memorial 
inducts punk rocker Randy “Biscuit” 

Turner on Friday, Nov. 18, (7-9pm at Austin 
City Hall with an afterparty at the Parlor), 
his name will add a neon glow to a list that 
includes gospel, country, blues, rock, and 
Tejano notables across the decades. Also 
being honored are Walter Hyatt and Champ 
Hood of Uncle Walt’s Band, Gloria Jean 
Brown-Manor from Jean & the Rollettes, 
Anderson High School bandleader B.L. 
Joyce, drummer T.J. McFarland, patriarch 
Raymond Guerrero Donley, Dolores 
Fariss of Dolores & the Blue Bonnet 
Boys, Pariah’s Sims Ellison, and the enig- 
matic blues bassman Keith Ferguson. 

All have their stories. Some - like Ellison, 
Ferguson, and Turner - have also been on the 
cover of the Chronicle. Others, like B.L. Joyce, 
are a biography unto themselves. However 
long they each walked the Earth, here’s 
reward for a life well spent in music. 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER IS, 2011 the Austin chronicle 47 







■ 7/UMO 

Like a Hurricane 

The agony and the ecstasy of Ume 



BY DOUG FREEMAN 

Lauren Larson is frustrated. 

Standing on the inside stage of Emo’s, 
head down, her long, blond hair draped in a 
veil as she tunes her guitar, the Ume front- 
woman can’t get the sound she wants from 
her monitors. The sound check has gone on 
for nearly 15 minutes, and the patient crowd 
is growing restless. 

Larson isn’t trying to get the sound per- 
fect; she just needs to get it right. The local 
trio’s gear is cramped on the small stage in 
deference to the touring headliner’s back- 
line, an uncomfortable setup that leaves her 
bassist and husband, Eric Larson, pushed 
to the side and nearly on top of Rachel 
Rihrer’s drum kit. Somehow it’s fitting this 
show doubles as the threesome’s hometown 
CD release, because that’s the struggle 
Ume’s drawn out since forming in Houston 
in 2002. With new sophomore full-length 
Phantoms (see “Texas Platters,” Sept. 9), the 
band’s decade finally comes to fruition. 

At 9pm sharp, as if planned all along, Ume 
launches into “The Conductor” from 2009’s 
breakthrough EP Sunshower. Everything 
changes in the flash of 
hard-pounded percussion 
and a tight guitar riff. With 
a flick of her hair, Larson’s 
apparent temerity trans- 
forms into a cold, hard 
stare penetrating the back 
of the room, and her voice, 
demure and hushed but a 
moment ago, wraps itself 
in an aggressive breath- 
lessness around the throb- 
bing bass rhythm. 

By the time the trio 
crosses into “Rubicon,” 
the lead track from the 
new LP, the singer-guitar- 
ist has consumed the club. The ephemeral 
pull of her vocals cuts with a sharper edge 
as she launches uninhibitedly center 
stage, attacking her instrument in a flail- 
ing tempest of hair contrasting with her 


short black dress. She’s both possessed 
and in possession. 

This is the essence of Ume, whose lyri- 
cally raw songs expose emotional uncer- 
tainty and wanting buffeted by the counter- 
ing forcefulness of a power trio. Live, 
Larson’s an ambivalent siren, letting the 
crowd feed on its own objectifying presump- 
tions - of sexuality, admiration, innocence, 
vulgarity, or vulnerability - only to shatter 
all of that upon the rocks of her own com- 
plete immersion in the music, the melodic 
lull and devastating pummel of Ume. 

Destroyer 

“When people see an aggressive female 
rocker, there are certain misconceptions 
about it,” Lauren Larson acknowledges a 
week later, the band gathered around a 
table at Rio Rita on East Sixth Street. “It 
cracks me up.” 

She speaks at a fast clip, excitable but 
direct, with an oddly foreign lilt that can’t be 
accounted for by her small-town Southeast 
Texas upbringing in West Columbia. Her 
husband, Eric, strikes a 
more serious, poised tone, 
a dynamic resembling the 
couple’s onstage pres- 
ence. Rachel Fuhrer, 
drafted this year to replace 
original drummer Jeff 
Barrera, sits between 
them injecting levity into 
the conversation. 

“It’s kind of shocking, 
though, because every- 
thing I do is 100 percent 
genuine. I’m passionate 
about what I’m doing, 
and I’m going to have 
fun, and I see this as my 
one chance to hold nothing back, whether 
I’m writing a song or playing guitar. And 
people can interpret it however they want, 
but it’s frustrating because a lot of times 
people expect me to be a total bitch. 


“I think I’ve tried to turn it into a goal. I 
work a lot with Girls Rock Camp, and, in 
general, I would like for women to be able to 
take the stage and people not be surprised 
to see them there. They’re surprised by 
what I do, and it catches them off guard and 
it’s unsettling, but you shouldn’t have to 
look a certain way to sound a certain way. I 
want to try to be one of the heaviest-rocking 
musicians out there. 

“I don’t know, I think I look pretty tough,” 
she laughs. 

That burden of breaking expectations has 
become a familiar ballast for the band, serv- 
ing as both catalyst for its popularity and 
complication to a career. The furious energy 
of Ume’s live show has cultivated a national 
fan base, yet the inability to easily box their 
music has also continually led labels and 
industry insiders to balk, even as they have 
courted the band. And then there’s the mar- 
ried couple at the center of it all. 


“We met when I was 15 years old, playing 
guitar in a punk rock/grindcore band called 
Twelve Blades,” offers Lauren. “We were 
playing at a skate park in Baytown, and he 
was the first guy to come up and ask for my 
number. We’ve been together and playing 
music together ever since.” 

Now married for more than a decade, the 
couple’s personal relationship has undoubt- 
edly pushed the band forward where others 
would have fallen apart, and it has provided 
them with a more patient and dedicated 
view of the band’s trajectory. Ume’s debut, 
2005’s Urgent Sea, has served as a reminder 
to the band to take its time and get it right. 
Rushed and recorded after being approached 
by NYC-based label Pretty Activity, the 
album captured the band’s raw intensity 
but with little direction or control. 

“We had been playing for under a year 
when we recorded it,” explains the singer, 
“and when we started the band, Jeff had 


Lauren Larson 
launches uninhibitedly 
center stage, attacking 
her instrument in a 
flailing tempest of 
hair contrasting with 
her short black dress. 
She's both possessed 
and in possession. 




END OF AN EAR 


CDs / Records / DVDs 



48 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



Thanks Dick Dubois - 
Master of Guitar Repair 
and Crossword Puzzles 



ITCHED 


MUSIC ELECTRONICS: 
BUY, SELL, REPAIR. 
1111 E. 1 1TH ST. 


SWITCHEDONAUSTlN.COM 



never played drums before, Eric wasn’t a 
bass player, and I had never sung. It was a 
real learning experience.” 

Not until 2008, when Lauren left gradu- 
ate studies in philosophy at Penn State and 
returned to Austin, did Ume jell to the 
point of re-emerging with the stunning 
Sunshower EP 

Burst 

Phantoms signals an equally powerful 
evolution for Ume, serving as both proper 
debut and antidote to Urgent Sea’s false 
start. The disc also vindicates the band’s 
crash course in the music business over the 
past couple of years, fraught with failed 
contract negotiations before finally teaming 
with local imprint Modern Outsider. 

“A lot of people will come up to you and 
they’re interested in what you’re doing,” 
says Eric. “But we work really hard at this, 
so we don’t want someone to just come along 
and do the same thing that they do with 
everybody else and just assume that it’s 
going to work. We don’t expect that of our- 
selves, so why would we expect that of any- 
body else that wants to work with us? With 
Modern Outsider, those guys care about us 
as musicians and what we’re trying to do, 
and it’s been a really good thing. And we 
tried to make sure that whatever agreement 
we came to, it forced us all to work hard.” 

The delay in recording and releasing 
Phantoms ultimately served the band well, 
allowing for a more developed and nuanced 


sound that unveils a texture drastically dif- 
ferent from the live experience, without 
compromising the aggressiveness that’s 
come to define the trio live. 

“With Sunshower, we had finally learned 
to play together,” opines Eric. “For 
Phantoms, when writing the songs, we 
wanted it to have a feeling, to have some 
tension and stress.” 

The album also proves Lauren coming 
into her own as a songwriter and 
a vocalist. 

“This is an emotional record for me,” she 
admits. “There’s more intimacy to it, a little 
more personal tension that I don’t think 
was on Sunshower. I was more emotionally 
invested in it in every way. I didn’t even 
think we were necessarily going to finish it. 
I didn’t know if I could finish it.” 

That evolution is best displayed on the 
re-recording of “Hurricane” from Urgent 
Sea, the original’s jagged howl that breaks 
across the opening line “I unleash like a 
hurricane, raging” now wrought with a tone 
both more ominous and more seductive in 
the waves of her low, breathless hum. When 
it finally unravels into shreds of climbing 
guitar licks, the release is palpable - inevi- 
table - yet still unexpected. It’s the dichoto- 
my that defines Ume, the agony and the 
ecstasy of control and release. 

“There are so many preconceived 
notions with rock & roll,” nods Lauren. “I 
want to help redefine it. And break it all 
apart again.” ■ 



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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 49 






REVIEWS 


Charanga Cakewalk 

El Brown Recluse (Cosmica) 

As third album overall and first in five years 
for Charanga Cakewalk, El Brown Recluse 
takes its double entendre to heart. A multi- 
instrumentalist of all-star repute, Michael 
Ramos is the CC moniker’s pihata-maker 
with a baseball bat, and El Brown Recluse 
swats it out of the park. Loteria de la Cumbia 
Lounge, 2004 debut for major label imprint 
Artemis, took after its title in hopscotching 
through groove-oriented chill-out cumbias with 
as many faces/places as an actual loteria 
card. Sophomore follow-up Chicano Zen two 
years later didn’t so much take a step back 
as inward - head music - slinkier, more elec- 
tronically insidious, and with better coalescence. El Brown Recluse makes its predecessors 
sound like child’s play. From the percussive shuffle of opener “Too Many” to closing “Cumbia 
Pa Modernos,” the arachnid bite here is naturally organic, the list of musicians speaking to 
the disc’s live band chemistry: first-listed Yayo Serka on drums and percussion, Max Baca on 
bajo sexto, and the youngbloods, David Garza, Ceci Bastida, and Sahara Smith. Ramos leads 
with accordion coloring brighter than a tray of Mexican sweet breads, plus a carnivalesque 
array of trumpet, melodica, marimbol, and Hammond B-3 organ, with all manner of keyboards. 
His figurative and not literal brother Brian Ramos weighs in with guitars and killing co-write 
“Agua Ardiente,” which sounds born out of cantina jukeboxes from here to Argentina. The head 
honcho and Gecko Turner’s “Hey Mano, Hey Mana” swings a Caribbean mantra custom-made 
for Manu Chao. Front-loaded with big-fish-hook vocals, Recluse settles into its instrumental 
mojo midway through with belly rub “Marimbol Sublime,” and suddenly out come the salt and 
lime. That 80-proof shot goes through the cabana roof on the Ramos’ black magic hook in 
“Tinieblas,” whose segue into the equally spellbinding “Black Mambo” practically means lights 
out on the party meter, its accordion calling the tune alongside Latin percussion more addic- 
tive than a churro. “Pocho,” what my sweet little old Mexican grandmother accused me of once 
or twice, bounces as cutely as its siblings. El Brown Recluse, get bit. 

★★★★ - Raoul Hernandez 


TEXAS PLATTERS 



★★★★★ PERFECT ★★★★ GREAT ★★★ GOOD ★★ MEDIOCRE ★ COASTER 


Rick Broussard’s 
Two Hoots 
& a Holler 
Come and Take It (Rick 
Broussard Records) 

The phrase “come 
and take it” is experi- 
encing a rebirth, so it’s no surprise that Rick 
Broussard co-opted it as title for the only 
instrumental on his new CD. It’s a muscle- 
bound rocker, one of many shades of roots 
rock he and his band, Two Hoots & a Holler, 
built a career on in Austin over the years, but 
never so unabashedly recorded. Broussard’s 
never been afraid to walk the swamps (“Go 
Ahead and Cry”), and here he hits the coun- 
try notes hard, too (“Every Bit as Proud,” 

“Me Not Calling”), going head-to-head on 
guitar with bandmate Matt Brooks and wax- 
ing Pogues-like over Dylan’s “Times They Are 
a Changin’.” Yet Broussard finds his muse 
in the Texas Tornado himself, rendering the 
anthemic “I Cried and Cried the Day Doug 
Sahm Died” an instant classic tearjerker. 

If Come and Take It isn’t a “career” album, 
Broussard’s still got lots of tricks up his 
sleeve and plenty of fire and brimstone in 
his tank. (CD release: Continental Club, 
Friday, Nov. 18, with Patricia Vonne) 

★★V - Margaret Moser 



m nan m a must 


W 


Graham Weber 

Women 

The Graham Weber 
of Women is a desper- 
ate man, broken and 
beaten and confronting 
all of his own excuses. 

“I’m searching for escape from all the things 
I do to keep myself immune,” the local singer- 
songwriter declares on his fourth LP. Weber’s 
a master of narrative and image in his songs, 
capturing slight, glinting moments that pass 
so tentatively by, but Women turns that atten- 
tion inward for a complex emotional reckoning. 
As “I’m Already Lonely,” “Settle Down,” “Black 
and White,” and the trembling, unadorned 
“Baltimore” all strike with a brutal rawness, 
the production and arrangements manage to 
balance and ease the sullen sentiment with 
vibrant unexpected punches, as with bookend- 
ers “Sweet Virginia Brown” and “Sleep It Off,” 
featuring local songstresses Dana Falconberry 
and BettySoo, respectively. The female har- 
monies likewise shade both heartbreak and 
hope, courtesy of Carrie Rodriguez, Bonnie 
Whitmore, and more, Weber working through 
memory and gin. As in life, Women isn’t always 
easy, but it’s more than worth the struggle. 
★★★V - Doug Freeman 


Vinyl Bin .v SBE6 beets 


Flesh Lights 
Muscle Pop 
(Twistworthy) 

Named for a 
torch-shaped rub- 
ber vagina, Austin’s 
Flesh Lights pun- 
gently encapsulate 
the sorry state of 
sexless males with this 12-song scuzz- 
punk meditation. While the Motards/ 
Chumps are clear hometown antecedents, 
the trio’s loco-motive mash of distorted 
guitar yaps played out against dramatically 
garbled shout-along vox and caffeinated 
surf beats has a hot-pink bubblegum core. 
That makes a ham-fisted, cunnilingus- 
alluding love note such as “I Am Romance” 
soak through like a ripped-jeans riff on 
the Ohio Express. Muscle Pop’s elongated 
climax, “The Biggest Mistake,” introduces 
collapsing piano runs that embody the 
compromising roil of hatred and horniness 
that morphs breakups into life-squandering 
sagas. ★★★V 

Muchos 
Backflips! 

Curtains I Tell You 
(Do for It) 

Scan your ticket 
and climb aboard 
this wild ride chan- 
neling Edgard 
Varese by way of Frank Zappa and Mike 
Patton. Muchos Backflips! specializes in 
mostly instrumental avant-rock incensed 
with cinematic jazz-creep horns skittering 
though Herb Alpert-like bullfights, Ennio 
Morricone spaghetti Westerns, and Tom 
Scott cop shows. Lengthwise, the local 
quintet’s songs range from 60-second 
blips (“Night Blaster”) to rollicking, eight- 
minute epics (“Fortress of the Frogs”). 

The latter’s narrative reaches a high point 
with a suspenseful trumpet solo from 
guest Margaret Whitt. Animators and game 
designers, take note: This piece demands 
a companion visual. ★★★ 


The 

Pheromoans 

Bar-Rock 

(Monofonus Press) 

This locally 
labeled UK quintet 
specializes in dif- 
ficult listening that 
demands engage- 
ment on its own warped terms. Proffering 
eerie, pitch-shifted vocals against a disori- 
enting backdrop of sparse guitar/keyboard 
interplay, the Pheromoans reside in the 
vicinity of avant-punk and denuded psyche- 
delia. Opener “Let’s Meet Our Captains” 
scrawls a jagged line in the sand with its 
noisy, broken conclusion that will turn off 
all but the stoutest curiosity seekers. And 
yet, as with all cult movements worth their 
salt, your brain will adjust with repeated 
exposure. By the time “Finsbury Sound” 
rolls around, the seemingly slapdash 
veneer of Bar-Rock takes on an air of twist- 
ed majesty. ★★★V 

Palit 

Popt 

(Pecan Crazy) 

Led by multital- 
ented visual artist/ 
songwriter Lance 
McMahan, Palit 
taps a Shimmy 
Disc-inspired strain 
of mutant sleepwalk pop from the outside 
looking in. Most songs on Popt are catchy 
at heart, but forlorn vocal delivery and 
melancholic shoebox arrangements under- 
mine their conventionality. The pleasantly 
tweaked “Pirates” resonates like a muffled 
Bowie/Eno outtake, while “Psychic Knife” 
ambles forth on a xylophonic melody that 
gradually unfolds into a rumpled epic 
climax. Finally, there’s “Return the Bad 
Purchase,” an ice-cold, pitch-black waltz 
with inner demons confirming that some- 
thing was a little off-kilter all along. ★★★ 






Will Sexton 

Move the Balance 

Although he never really went away, here’s a signal that 
Will Sexton is back. He suffered a mild stroke late in 2009, 
after which the homegrown singer-songwriter realized he could 
remember very little of his music. Move the Balance was initial- 
ly issued early in 2010 but was hardly noticed at the time and, 
with his recovery a priority, was basically shelved. Reissued 
nearly two years later, it still rings with Sexton’s lyrical mean- 
derings set off by a variety of rootsy backdrops. While in the 
past he’s delivered satisfying dreamscapes, Move the Balance 
trends pop in the manner of early Nick Lowe, simple and catchy melodies striking at funda- 
mental lyric truths. The slow smolder of “Sunday Driver,” Tom Petty-style Dylan-esque mash-up 
“Little Late for Loving Me Now,” and the off-kilter joyfulness of “Happy Hour” are doubly satis- 
fying in the fact that Sexton’s once again operating at 100%. 

★★★ - Jim Caligiuri 



50 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 











iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii The Chronicle Preview of the iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmm 

EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR 


Quip n Slide 

How’s your 20/20 vision? 

BY ROBERT FAIRES 

Encapsulate your career, your philosophy, your creative 
process in 400 seconds, utilizing for visual aids only 20 
images, each shown for 20 seconds. Can you do it? That’s 
the challenge faced by each of the participants in Pecha 
Kucha Night, the ongoing presentational series for which 
local architects, designers, photographers, painters, writers, 
sculptors, and filmmakers stand before a screen and give 
you some idea about what they do in a brisk six minutes, 40 
seconds. (The series takes its name from a Japanese term 
for “chitchat,” but it might just as easily be translated as 
“Grown-up Show-and-Tell.”) And most of those creative 
types who take on the 400-second challenge manage the 
feat quite entertainingly - so much so that what began as a 
local event in Tokyo in 2003 has spread like a bad rumor in 
high school to some 450 cities across the globe. Austin, 
naturally, adored the idea and has been chitchatting two or 
three times a year for five years now. Since 2009, one of 
those annual Pecha Kucha Nights has been scheduled dur- 
ing the East Austin Studio Tour, opening one more window 
into artists’ ways of working during the two-week period 
when our town suddenly and briefly goes art-mad. If any- 
thing, that’s only served to heighten the popularity of the 
local Pecha Kuchas, which always draw crowds. (The fact 
that they’re free may be a factor as well.) The mix of pre- 
senters is always fascinating, as evident in the lineup of 
Pecha Kucha Night Austin #12: Katy Vine (writing), Herman 
Dyal (architecture), Alyson Fox (visual art), Connie 
Arismendi (visual art), Jay B. Sauceda (photography), Will 



Jennifer Chenoweth at 
Pecha Kucha #10 


Hornaday (culture), Andrew Yates and Mike Woolf (film), 
Ashley Chiles (film), Bale Creek Allen (visual art), and 
Robert Kraft (music). Is there anyone there that you 
wouldn’t want at show-and-tell? ■ 


Pecha Kucha Night Austin #12 takes place Thursday, Nov. 17, 8:20pm, 
at the former Goodwill store, 916 Springdale, near Blue Genie. For more 
information, visit www.pecha-kucha.org/night/austin/12. 


Five Brenner Tips To Spark 
Your EAST Experience 


So You Think You Can Paint? 

Reality TV-style art competition returns for Season Two 


BY ROBERT FAIRES 

If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. 

That was the idea behind Eyes Got It!, the live art com- 
petition launched during the 2010 East Austin Studio Tour. 
Artist Salvador Castillo, who created the art blog ’Bout 
What I Sees, figured that as long as we’re one nation under 
American Idol (and Survivor and The Bachelor and The 
Voice and Project Runway and Top Chef, yadda yadda 
yadda), why not embrace our fixation with reality TV for 
the benefit of the visual arts? So he put out a 
call for art and arranged for three Austin art 
professionals to judge the submissions and 
choose a winner just like they do on all those 
contest shows we TiVo, only do it live and in 
front of the public. In addition to capitalizing 
on our competition mania, Castillo hoped the 
event might help to demystify and illuminate 
the critical process, as well as draw attention to 
area artists. And it couldn’t be worse than 
Bravo’s Work of Art, right? 

Last year’s event drew 68 submissions, from which 
judges Sterling Allen (artist, Okay Mountain), Rachel 
Koper (program director, Women & Their Work), and Risa 


Puleo (assistant curator, Blanton Museum of Art) selected 
Chloe Yingst as the winner. The Texas State University art 
student was showered with gift certificates to art-related 
businesses, guest passes and memberships to area muse- 
ums, and the big prize: her own solo exhibit at Pump 
Project Art Complex. 

The event’s success prompted Castillo to bring back 
Eyes Got It! for a “second season” at EAST 2011. Artist 
Jules Buck Jones (Boozefox) joins Puleo and 
Koper as judges, with this year’s top prize being 
a one-person show at grayDUCK Gallery. This 
Friday, Nov. 18, 6:30-9:30pm, at art space 
1319Rosewood - located, curiously enough, at 
1319 Rosewood - the trio will make their picks in 
three rounds: first, an American Idol- style yes/ 
no vote, where two yeas keep you in and two 
nays knock you out; second, a critique of the Top 
10 semifinalists, after which six are eliminated; 
and finally, an art-school critique where the judges quiz the 
final four. Your DVR won’t save this one. Better plan to be 
there in the flesh to see who’s the last artist standing. For 
more information, visit www.salvadorcastillo.wordpress.com. ■ 


1) When checking out “Monster Show 6” at Domy Books (see 
“Fiends With Benefits,” p.54), 913 E. Cesar Chavez, make 
sure you look at the ceiling at the far end of the gallery: 

It’s up there, waiting. 

2) How can you, scraping by on that income, find something 
original and hangable for just $25? Birdhouse Gallery, 

1304 E. Cesar Chavez, is selling dozens of tiny artworks - 
varied and vivid and 4 inches by 4 inches - for just that 
much. Bonus: Agave Prints pop-up next door, with works by 
Sev Coursen, Leon Alesi, Virginia Fleck, and more. 

3 ) You like grackles? Well, then you’re a sick little monkey, but you 
won’t want to miss “The Great Grackle Show” at Clayworks, 
1209 E. Sixth, where the vile bird is celebrated in ink, in paint, 
in glass, in ceramics, and on “Grackle con Chee-to” T-shirts. 

4 ) Grab a bite at Buenos Aires Cafe, 1201 E. Sixth. Not just 
any bite and don’t look at the menu; never mind the other 
stuff, no matter how putatively tasty. Just go in, sit down, 
and order a chicken empanada. That’s right, just a chicken 
empanada. My email is listed in the Chronicle masthead: 
You can thank me via that address. 

5 ) Big Medium, 5305 Bolm #12. Don’t even get me started on 
thisplace, this busy warren of artists and studios and relent- 
less creation, the very epicenter of EAST. They should be more 
accurate; they should call it Big Fucking Medium. Simply: Wow. 

continued on p.54 


eyes 

got it! 

an arc compettior- 
eyes oti you 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 51 







ARTISTS b STUDIOS 

NOV 12,13 & 19,20 - 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM 






The Chronicle Preview of the 

EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR 


continued from p.51 


Fiends with Benefits 


The art in ‘Monster Show 6' celebrates 
the horrifying, deliciously so 

BY WAYNE ALAN BRENNER 

Normal people - and, yes, what does that actually 
mean? But they’re out there, millions of them. And this is 
not just a surface gloss; it holds true on a more intimate 
level, too, in my experience. Hell, I’ve slept with some of 
them, been involved in half a relationship or two with 
their ilk over the past 30 years; how much more field 
research do you require? 

But, right, normal people. Oh, how they love Halloween! 
Because it gives them an excuse to dress up in bizarre cos- 
tumes and wear masks and so on. And normal people need 
such a societally approved excuse: That’s one of the ways 
you can tell they’re normal. And they celebrate monsters 
during that holiday, too, oh boy. But they don’t typically 
celebrate monsters other than that. Because that would be 
- horrors! - weird. 

No, the more perennial celebration of monsters is left to 
other monsters: artists. 

Because, what is a monster anyway? A monster is the other. 
Perhaps the otherness is especially terrifying due to size or 
fanginess or some such physiological difference, but, when 
you’re fresh out of Godzilla, people who are simply other than 
normal will do - as a catalyst for terror or envy or, at the very 
least, niggling mistrust. (Any questions? Ask Shirley Jackson.) 

And those people, the other-than-normal ones, or at least the 
ones among that motley tribe who practice art, are the best 
people to communicate with, to represent, to act as ambassa- 
dors to the land of the truly monstrous. 


Right now Domy Books, that elegant emporium of so 
much that’s vividly published about graphic design and 
esoteric literature ( and the lit itself) and arcane methods of 
music and fashion, is serving as a sort of Monster Embassy. 
The current exhibition, “Monster Show 6,” brings the cre- 
ations of dozens of artists from around the country to its 
storied walls. Russell Etchen, the tall ginger man behind 
this series, has contracted quite an array of ambassadors. 

Nick Derington has a monster in there, looking like 
something Frodo would have nightmares about if he’d 
watched Star Wars too many times. Ruth Van Beek has 
perpetrated a photo collage that reveals the true but hid- 
den essence of your ordinary house cat. Tim Brown and 
Emily Halbarider have collaborated on a poster that’s 
unnerving in its simplicity and its instilling of a WTF-I’d- 
better-fride reaction from your inner child. Abi Daniel ... oh 
my God. Maybe it’s due to Daniel’s soft watercolor realism 
that her portrait of a young deer (a more natural-looking 
Bambi) turned zombie is so horrifying; but it certainly, 
deliciously, is. 

And, yes, there’s more. And more. And more, in an 
almost monstrous amount, from others like Michael Seiben, 
Deth P Sun, Rachel Niffenegger, Dan Hanafin, oh, it’s 
almost too terrifying - the amount of talent - to go on. 

But you go on, friend. Pay a visit to Domy and see the 
creatures displayed there now. The visions probably won’t 
bother you that much (some of them are, aw, sweet), and 



D’oh! A Deer ! 


some may even seem a bit familiar - unless. Well, unless 
you’re too fucking normal. ■ 

“Monster Show 6” runs through Dec. 8 at Domy Books, 913 E. Cesar Chavez. 
For more information, call 476-3669 or visit www.domystore.com. 



Shorn of Plenty 

Surviving ‘Haircuts by Children' 

BY WAYNE ALAN BRENNER 


When last we saw our intrepid reporter, 
he was going under the knife - er, the scis- 
sors - of a pair of 10-year-olds who’d been 
briefly trained in the tonsorial arts for the 
Fusebox-presented Haircuts by Children 
event during the East Austin Studio Tour. 
(See “Shear Faith,” Nov. 11.) 

Well, we can see that reporter again, but 
much of his hair will be missing, the absent 
follicles further shortened to, shall we say, 
reinstate equilibrium after his shearing at 
the hands of young Mike and Mariah at the 
Peacock Salon last Thursday night. 

Sweet pair of young ones, seriously: cour- 
teous, task-focused, safety-conscious. Kids, 
take a bow. 

But, y’know, there’s a reason why stylists 
are trained professionals and usually 
steeped in years of coiffing experience. And 
there’s evidence as to why those with some- 
what less experience, who are well-meaning 
but well-meaning fifth-graders, might do 
better to heavily practice barbering via the 
interactive Wii before tackling actual 
meatspace heads of full, glorious (read par- 
tially balding) hair. 

Evidence, we say? Yes. For your consider- 
ation, dear reader: The back of Brenner’s 
manly skull-pelt, after the sharp attentions 
of 10-year-olds. ■ 



54 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 





NOW ON OUR LISTENING STATIONS: GREAT NEW MUSK FROM THE LONE STAR STATE 




GARY CLARK JR. 

Bright Lights 

“Hot licks and eloquent solos... 
the best young gun” 
-Roling Stone 

“A virtuosic new act” - LA Times 

$4.99 CD 



GERONIMO SON 

Life In The Tower 

A heart-piercing cry from the 
concrete wilderness in blistering 
garage swamp, ghost ballads, 
rock opera and western dub. 

$8.99 CD 


MILES ZUNIGA 

These Ghosts Have Bones 

The singer/ guitarist of Fastball 
releases his splendidly heart- 
broken” debut solo album . 
$9.99 CD 



THE ASTEROID SHOP 

The Asteroid Shop 

The Asteroid Shop is a rare 
treat for folks who still look for 
craft in their songs. 

$10.99 CD 



GHOSTS ALONG THE BRAZOS 

Ghosts Along The Brazos 

Steeped in tradition, though never 
constrained by it, The Ghosts album includes 
songs ranging in style from country to folk 
to swing with everything in between! 

$9.99 CD 


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RICK BROUSSARD'S 
TWO HOOTS AND A HOLLER 

Come And Take It 

A blast of traditional country 
spiked with punk fury. 
$8.99 CD 




THE COPA KINGS 

The Copa Kings 

With great reverence, The Copa 
Kings bring a unique passion, 
artistry and flair to the jazz and 
swing music of the 1930s-50s 

$8.99 CD 



THE PONS 

The Blackest Shine 

"...throughout you?ll discover 
moments of vulnerability, clarity 
and triumph." 

KUT 90.5 - NPR Public Radio 

$8.99 CD 



REED TURNER 

Side One: See How Far I Get 

Powerful Americana/Folk- Rock 
from award-winning Austin 
songwriter. 

$4.99 CD 



GRAHAM WILKINSON 

Spiritual Accesories 

Features the single "FOCUS" and 
attempts to address one of the 
most unifying themes amongst 
humanity; spirituality. 
$4,99 CD 



CASEY DONAHEW BAND 

Double-Wide Dream 

Double- Wide Dream shows CDB are 
back doing what they do best - creat- 
ing Texas-centric country-rock for a 
fanbase that continues to grow. 
$10.99 CD 


SALE ENDS 12-15-201 




MITCHELL & HARRIS 

Traveling By Moonlight 

Refreshingly live and spontaneous, these 
hook heavy songs capture the sense of the 
players delighting in each other’s musical 
company and convey a sense of optimism 
even on the album’s most somber songs." 

$8.99 


BOOKA AND THE FLAMING GECKOS 

Not So Meaningful Songs... 

A unique blend of styles ranging from 
Americana, Bluegrass and Folk, to musings in 
Piedmont Blues and Acid Western featuring: 
Booka Michel, Cindy Cashdollar, Dennis 
Ludiker, Glenn Fukunaga and Kenny Franklin. 

10,99 CD 




MARK VIATOR & SUSAN MAXEY 

These Arms 

Soulful southern and Texas-folk songcraft 
propelled by Viator’s slide and acoustic 
guitar work, Maxet’s captivating voice 
and the close fit of their vocal harmonies. 
$1 1.99 CD 


RICHARD SANGUINETTI 

For Sentimental Reasons 

Rockin’ songs from Austin, TX 


BOOGALOO RHYTHM TRIO 

Boogaloo 

Boogaloo is an original project that 
fuses funk, jazz and other worldly 
styles to make their own sound. 


$8.99 CD 



3 \ 


$9.99 CD 


rate 


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Prize and Battlefield 

The debut album from Austin's Guns of 
Navarone combines folk sensibilities with 
country grit, and what comes out is nothing 
less than foot-stomping Americana rock. 

$9.99 CD 


TWANG 

Twang The Halls 

Rock & roll the holiday season with 
TWANG the Halls! 14 timeless classics 
served up with plenty of electric guitars 
and all that goes great with 'em. 
$-8.99 CD 




SCOTT H. BIRAM 

Bad Ingredients 

"A tour-de-force of gutbucket guitar 
squabble, vocals so feral they'll make you 
lock your doors at night.. .goes down like 
a cocktail of whiskey, amphetamines and 
black-humored despair." 

--LA Times 

$12.99 • LP Available 


JOEL HOBBS 

Good Dogs Always Eat 

Original compositions from 
multi-mstrumentalist Joel Hobbs, 
Director of the Austin Mandolin 
Orchestra. 

$10.99 CD 


WATERLOO 



Compact Discs 
Records • Video 

www.WaterlooRecords.com 

10-11 Mon-Sat 11-11 Sun 
600 N. Lamar Austin Texas 78703 
51 2.474.2500 

WHERE Music Trill MATTERS 


BUY, SELL & TRADE 

LPs, CDs, Video Games 
BLU-RAYs & DVDs 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 55 















LISTINGS 


r»TTTaTT»T!T7 


Recommendations for the week-minded 

NOVEMBER 17-24 


submit! 


For FAQs about submitting a 
listing, contact info, deadlines, 
and an online submission 


form, go to austinchronicle. 
com/submit. 

C/) 

p.14 

H 

Civics 101 

2 

p.37 

m 

Meal Times 

H 

p.40 

2 

Thanksgiving 

Feasts 

O 


U 

p.58 


Theatre 

Comedy 

Ui 

Dance 

o 

p.60 


Classical Music 

m 

Visual Arts 


p.61 

CQ 

Litera 

< 

H 

p.62 

Community 


Gay Place 

CO 

p.64 

Out of Town 

C D 

2 

Kids 

i— i 

Sports 

H 

p.66 

C/) 

Film 


p.74 



MEALTIMES: 

Empty Bowl Project 

The Marchesa, llam-3pm 


THURSDAY 

17 


FRIDAY 

18 


SATURDAY 

19 


SUNDAY 

20 


MONDAY 

21 



MUSIC: 

XimenaSarinana 

The Parish 



FILM: 

The Awful Truth 

Alamo Lamar, 7pm 


COMMUNITY: Inside Books Project Work Party Spacel2 
DANCE: Onstage/ Backstage: The Nutcracker Ballet Austin, 5:45pm 
CIVICS 101: Re-Fund Education Rally Texas Capitol, 6pm 
VISUAL ARTS: Pecha Kucha Night 916 Springdale, 7:30pm 
FILM: CineKink 29th Street Ballroom , 8pm 
COMEDY: Dov Davidoff Cap City Comedy Club, 8pm 


COMMUNITY: Service Austin Days 

FILM: Les Blank Retrospective Texas Spirit Theater, 6pm 

MUSIC: Nat Adderley 80th Birthday Celebration Momo’s 

FILM: Home Movies of Silent Film Stars Hyatt Regency, 8pm 

OUT OF TOWN: Stargazing at the Roughs McKinney Roughs, 8:30pm 


KIDS: Gingerbread House-Raising Neill-Cochran House Museum, 11am 
MEAL TIMES: Carnival o’ Pizza Home Slice Pizza, noon-lOpm 

FILM: Word Is Out: Stories of Some of Our Lives Paramount, 3pm 
LITERA: American Short Fiction: Best of the Beasts Domy Books, 7pm 
FILM: Nothing Sacred Paramount, 8pm 

COMEDY: Improvised Mysteries Salvage Vanguard Theater, 8pm 

MUSIC: Melt-Banana Mohawk 


MUSIC: Chuck Eddy BookPeople, 5pm 

FILM: AV Geeks: Balls Out Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 7pm 

MUSIC: Fu Manchu Red 7 

SPORTS: UT Women’s Basketball Erwin Center, 2pm 


FILM: Kill All Redneck Pricks Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 7pm 

MUSIC: Pete Anderson Continental Club 

FILM: I Want My MTV Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 10:05pm 


CIVICS 101: Feast of Sharing Palmer Events Center, 4-8pm 

GAY PLACE: Mail Art With Dandy Bernadette’s, 7-10pm 
THEATRE: The Intergalactic Nemesis Long Center, 8pm 


Music 


Free up your schedule 

for this week. 
Browse or search 



MUSIC: The Last Waltz Revisited Momo’s, 5:15pm 
THEATRE: A Tuna Christmas Paramount, 8pm 
MUSIC: Black Red Black The HighBall, 10pm 



THURSDAY GAY PLACE: Thanksgiving Meals Oilcan Harry’s and ’Bout Time, 2pm 

FOOD: Thanksgiving Feasts Around Town, p.40 


2,431 

events 


online at 


austindironicle.com/caleiidar 


fo?Xe?o™I?ions: ©AustinChroniCal 


Scan this for 
mobile listings: 


56 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







by Chuck Shepherd 



Awesome! The ingenuity of drug smugglers is never to be underestimated, 
as one ABC News report from Nogales, Ariz., in October demonstrated. 
Smugglers had dug tunnels from Nogales, Mexico, underneath the border to 
Nogales, Ariz., engineered perfectly to end along International Street’s metered 
parking spaces. Smugglers would pay to park vans with false bottoms in certain 
spaces, then would break though the pavement to meet the tunnelers and load 
the drugs. Still parked, the vans’ crews repaired the pavement, and the vans 
departed. “[U]nbelievable,” said the Arizona city’s mayor. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


LEAD STORY 

“You eat meat, so why not blood?” asked 
The Globe and Mail, which sampled several 
Toronto restaurants’ sanguinary haute cui- 
sines, including the Italian eatery Buca’s 
spaghetti with blood-blackened noodles and 
torta di sanguinaccio (figs, almonds, and buf- 
falo-milk creme anglaise on a base custard 
of dark chocolate and slow-cooked pig’s 
blood). Patrons “thought we were crazy,” said 
chef Rob Gentile, but now “can’t seem to 
get enough.” The Black Hoof restaurant buys 
16 liters of fresh blood a week for dishes 
like its own blood custard, seasoned with 
rosemary and pickled pears. Montreal’s DNA 
kitchen sometimes highlights blood soup 
and blood pasta. (The Noma in Copenhagen, 
Denmark - which some believe to be the 
best restaurant in the world - marinates 
cauliflower in pig’s blood.) 

THE CONTINUING CRISIS 

“I don’t get it. I just don’t get it. And you’re 
not going to get me to get it,” warned Marine 
squadron commander Lt. Col. Jerry Turner (to 
a Wall Street Journal Afghanistan reporter writ- 
ing in October), when learning that a few of 
his troops were sporting artistically shaped 
eyebrows sculpted by a barber in the town of 
Shinwar. Stylist Gulam Farooq can’t practice 
on Muslims (forbidden) but said one or two 
Marines come by every day (in between call- 
ing in artillery barrages) for tapering. 

The Military Times news service, reporting 
from Afghanistan in August, disclosed a U.S. 
Marines command directive ordering troops to 


restrain their audible flatus because, appar- 
ently, Afghan soldiers and civilians com- 
plained of being offended. The reporter doubt- 
ed the directive could be effective, in that 
passing gas by frontline troops is “practically 
a sport.” 

A vendor at a street market in Leipzig, 
Germany, was revealed in September to be 
shamelessly selling personally tailored coats 
and vests made with fur from house cats. A 
first report, in the sensationalist tabloid Bild, 
was doubted, but a follow-up by Germany’s 
premier news source, Spiegel, confirmed the 
story. The vendor said he needed eight cats 
to make a vest (priced at the equivalent of 
$685) and 18 for a coat. However, such sales 
are illegal under German and European Union 
laws, and the vendor subsequently denied 
that he sold such things. 

FAMILY VALUES 

Too Soon? An 11-year-old California boy 
and a 7-year-old Georgia girl have recently 
decided - with parental support - to come 
out as the other gender. The boy, Tommy, 
wants more time to think about it, said his 
lesbian parents, and has begun taking hor- 
mone blockers to make his transition easier 
should he follow through with plans (first dis- 
closed at age 3) to become “Tammy.” The 
McIntosh County, Ga., girl has been living as 
a boy for a year, said father Tommy Theollyn, a 
transgendered man who is actually the one 
who gave birth. Theollyn petitioned the school 
board in September (unsuccessfully) to allow 
the child to use the boys’ bathroom. 


Recurring Theme: Italian men are notorious 
bamboccioni (“big babies”) who exploit doting 
mothers by remaining in their family homes 
well into adulthood, sometimes into their 30s 
or later, expecting meals and laundry service. 
Many mothers are tolerant, but in September 
an elderly couple in the town of Mestre 
announced (through a consumer association) 
that if their 41-year-old, gainfully employed 
son did not meet a deadline for leaving, the 
association would file a lawsuit to evict him. 
(A news update has not been found, perhaps 
indicating that the son moved out.) 

CUTTING-EDGE TACTICS 

Crime-Fighting: 1) In October, about 120 
professional mimes began patrolling the traf- 
fic-congested Sucre district of Caracas, 
Venezuela, at the request of Mayor Carlos 
Ocariz. The white-gloved mimes’ specialty 
was wagging their fingers at scofflaw motor- 
ists and pedestrians, and mimes interviewed 
by the Associated Press reported improve- 
ments. 2) At least 300 professional clowns 
from Mexico and Central America, in Mexico 
City in October for a convention, demonstrat- 
ed against the country’s drug-cartel violence 
by laughing, in unison, nonstop, for 15 min- 
utes. (They were likely less successful than 
the mimes.) 

Parenting: Freemon Seay, 38, was arrested 
in Thurston County, Wash., in October on sus- 
picion of assault with a deadly weapon after 
disciplining his 16-year-old daughter for leav- 
ing home without his approval. Seay allegedly 
forced the girl to suit up in armor and helmet, 
with a wooden sword, and to fight him (also 
in armor, with a wooden sword) for over two 
hours until she could no longer stand up. 
Seay’s wife (the girl’s stepmother) was 
booked as an accessory and was said by 
deputies to have been supportive of her hus- 
band’s “Renaissance fair” enthusiasm (which 
Seay called a “lifestyle”). 

BRIGHT IDEAS 

In Malone, N.Y., in September, Clyde 
Gardner, 57, was sentenced to five to 15 
years in prison for trying to murder his ex-girl- 
friend twice. Initially, he was going to dress in 
a recently skinned bear’s hide, walk on its 
paws so as not to leave shoe prints, and 
“maul” her with the claws. After abandoning 
that plan, he promised a friend $15,000 to 
kill the woman in a car crash, and since 
Gardner was a demolition derby driver, he 
offered expert instructions (though the friend 
turned Gardner in). 

Basically, Toto is to sophisticated toilets in 
Japan as Apple is to consumer electronics in 
America. In September, Toto unveiled a proto- 
type motorcycle with a toilet bowl to convert a 
driver’s waste into fuel, not only making it 
self-gassed-up but also contributing to the 
company’s goal of reducing carbon dioxide 
emissions by 50% within six years. The com- 
pany was launching a monthlong, cross-coun- 
try publicity tour (presumably featuring a gas- 
trointestinal ly robust driver). 


Visit Chuck Shepherd daily at 

www.newsoftheweird.blogspot.com 
(or www.newsoftheweird.comj. 

Send your weird news to: Chuck Shepherd , PO Box 
18737 ; Tampa , FL 33679 or weirdnewstips@yahoo.com. 
©2011 Universal Press Syndicate 


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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 57 






LISTINGS 



An unusual, bigger slate of wild, entertaining improv 
- upstairs and downstairs (and never mind milady’s cham- 
bers) - for three solid nights. Simply D-Vine! Girls Girls Girls! 

Your Terrific Neighbors! Improv for Evil! Dickens Unleashed! Confidence Men! More! 
Improvisers coming out of the, whattayacallit, woodwork ! And, oh yes: waffles! In addition 
to the comedy, you get an all-you-can-eat waffle buffet. Goddamn crazy improvisers, god- 
damn tasty squares of cooked batter all bedecked with golden syrup or whipped cream or 
chocolate sauce or strawberry jam or - you get the picture. Now get tickets, while they last. 


Wafflefest! 


The usual slate of wild, 
entertaining improv? 


Thu. -Sat., Nov. 11-19, 8 & 10pm. $10-12 per show, 

The Hideout Theatre, 617 Congress, 443-3688. www.hideouttheatre.com. 




OPENING 

THE LION IN WINTER Austin Playhouse at Mueller 
presents this classic James Goldman drama about 
King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. 
Starring Huck Huckaby and Babs George; directed by 
Don Toner. Nov. 18-Dec. 18. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. 
I8OOV2 Simond, 476-0084. www.austinplayhouse.com. 

RELATIVE ELEPHANTS: AN ABSURDIST PLAY IN 
THREE ONE-ACTS Just what the title says but written 
and directed by Blake Addyson and Gricelda Silva. We 
also know this: What Silva’s been involved with in the 
past has rocked. Fri.-Sun., Nov. 18-20, 8pm. Starving Art 
Studios, 2326 E. Cesar Chavez. 405/226-0142. $10. 

O THE STORY OF JACOB MURAKAMI is alternative 
ly titled How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Realized 
Sacred Cows Make The Finest Cheeseburgers. It’s a 
comedy, yes, a play by Timothy Braun that’s getting a 
staged reading under the direction of Aaron Sanders. 
With a hell of a fine cast - Travis Bedard! Jeff Mills! 
Jeanne Harris! Even that ol’ Brenner! - and pizza for 
all. Sun., Nov. 20, 8pm. Salvage Vanguard Theater, 
2803 Manor Rd., 474-7886. Donations accepted. 
www.salvagevanguard.org. 

STRANGER This performance by Theatre From the 
Passage, an ensemble of performers from the Slovak 
Republic with developmental disabilities, explores the 
question: What is normal and what is strange? Sun., 
Nov. 20, 7pm. Salvage Vanguard Theater, 2803 Manor 
Rd., 454-9912. $15 ($10, seniors, students, people 
with disabilities), www.vsatx.org. 

A TUNA CHRISTMAS All those quirky characters 
from the third smallest town in Texas come to life 
again this holiday season, with every one of them, 
male and female, young and old, performed by Joe 
Sears and Jaston Williams with perfect timing and 
crowd-pleasing panache. Nov. 22-27. Tue.-Wed., 8pm; 
Fri.-Sat ., 2 & 8pm; Sun., 2 & 7:30pm. Paramount 
Theatre, 713 Congress, 472-5470. $28-56. 
www.austintheatre.org. 

THE INTERGALACTIC NEMESIS, BOOK ONE: 
TARGET EARTH Back for one night after a worldwide 
tour! It’s part radio play, part live graphic novel, 
all sci-fi comedy adventure for the whole family as 
intrepid reporter Molly Sloan and her assistant Timmy 
Mendez uncover the story of the century. Vigorous 
voices! Fantastic Foley! Live music by Graham 
Reynolds! Tue., Nov. 22, 8pm. Long Center for the 
Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside, 457-5100. $19-49. 
www.theintergalacticnemesis.com . 


CLOSING 

360 (ROUND DANCE) Steven Dietz’s new romantic 
drama is based on Arthur Schnitzler’s 1900 play 
Reigen, directed here by Courtney Sale. Through 
Nov. 20. Thu.-Fri., 8pm; Sun., 2pm. Oscar G. Brockett 
Theatre, Winship Drama Building , 23rd & San Jacinto, 
471-1444. $20 ($17, faculty ; staff; $15, students). 
www.texasperformingarts.org. 

THE MIRACLE WORKER Here’s that Tony-winning 
story of blind and deaf Helen Keller and her teacher 
Annie Sullivan, as written by William Gibson (maybe 
not the one you’re thinking of, though) and pre- 
sented with a solid cast under the direction of Andy 
Berkovsky. Through Nov. 20. Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 
5:30pm. City Theatre, 3823-D Airport, 524-2870. 
$15-25 ($10, Thursdays; kids’ discounts, too). 
www.citytheatreaustin.org. 

A LIE OF THE MIND This production of Sam 
Shepard’s intense family drama is directed by Jared 
J. Stein and boasts the extraordinary Bernadette 
Nason among its talented cast. Through Nov. 20. 
Thu.-Sat., 7:30pm; Sun., 2pm. Mary Moody Northen 
Theatre at St. Edward’s University ; 3001 S. Congress, 
448-8484. $20 (cheaper in advance). 

O GUEST BY COURTESY Can you imagine the 
more rivalrous parts of Sense and Sensibility, say, 
or Jane Eyre as directed by Tex Avery? Close, but 
Jenny Larson and Hannah Kenah (who also star in 
this hilarious show with Jason Hays) have imagined 
it even better - and got Graham Reynolds to provide 
the music. You’ve never seen a tea party quite this 
mad. Recommended. Through Nov. 19. Thu.-Sat., 8pm. 
Salvage Vanguard Theater, 2803 Manor Rd., 

474-7886. www.salvagevanguard.org. 

OTHELLO Philip Kreyche directs Shakespeare’s 
classic in all its period intensity. Through Nov. 18. 
Thu.-Fri ., 8pm. Center Stage, 2826 Real. $15 ($10, 
students), www.othelloaustin.wordpress.com. 

ONGOING 

BIG LOVE Charles Mee’s uproarious and heartbreak- 
ing comedy about 50 runaway brides seeking refuge 
in a villa on the Italian coast is based on Aeschylus’ 
classic The Supplicants. The Chronicle’s own Robert 
Faires directs a cast of fierce talents in this big stage 
version from Shrewd Productions. Through Nov. 27. 
Thu. -Sun., 8pm. Long Center for the Performing Arts, 
701 W. Riverside , 457-5100. $20-25 ($15, students). 
www.thelongcenter.org. 

WELL Lisa Kron’s new comedy explores the dynam- 
ics of health, family, and community with the story of 



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a mother’s ability to heal a changing neighborhood, 
despite her inability to heal herself. Directed by 
Norman Blumensaadt for Different Stages. Through 
Dec. 3 Thu.-Sat., 8pm; Sun., 7pm. No show: Nov. 24. 
Extra show: Wed., Nov. 30, 8pm. Through Dec. 3. The 
Vortex, 2307 Manor Rd., 478-5282. $15-30. 
www.vortexrep.org. 

auditions 

EXTRAS NEEDED FOR ABC SERIES ‘THE LYING 
GAME’ TV calls. Bring a headshot. Sat., Nov. 19, 
9am-7pm. Austin Studios’ Red Building, 1901 E. 51st. 
www.abcfamily.go.com/shows/lying-game. 

theatre call board 

FRONTERAFEST 2012 IS HIRING staff and produc 
tion team members, including a festival coordina- 
tor, box office personnel, house managers, board 
operators, stage managers, and assistant stage 
managers. All staff and crew will receive a small 
stipend. Send resume and letter of interest to: 

Flyde Park Theatre; ATTN: FronteraFest; 511 W. 43rd, 
Austin, TX 78751. 


I il 1 1 1 1 II 

IN THE CLUBS 

CAP CITY COMEDY CLUB 8120 Research #100, 

467-2333. www.capcitycomedy.com. 

Carlos Mencia C’mon, it’s Carlos Mencia. You 
don’t need to know more than the name, because 
you already know, thanks to Comedy Central, his 
mind. Thu., Nov. 17, 10:30pm. $30. 

Scott Kennedy Comedy Central lists this Lubbock 
native and festival favorite as one of the Top 100 
Comics of All Time. Catch him here before he flies 
back to Iraq to entertain troops for the 45th time. 
Natalie Cox opens. Nov. 23-26. Wed., 8pm; Fri.-Sat., 
8 & 10:30pm. $9-13. 

Dov Davidoff The hyperintense comedian who’s 
a fixture, like funnyman furniture on Comedy 
Central and all across the little screens, brings 
his acute sense of the absurd to Cap City, with 
Emily Galati opening. Nov. 17-19. Thu., 8pm; 
Fri.-Sat., 8 & 10:30pm. $9-13. 

COLDTOWNE THEATER 4803-B Airport, 814-TOWN. 

www.coldtownetheater.com . 

This Week in Coldness: Minotaure Arthur 
Simone is bullish on comedy, and a whole troupe 
ups the ante in this sketch explosion. Thu., 
8:30pm. Breaking News Sketch comedy, yo. Thu., 
10pm. Jerk Parade New stuff from the acclaimed 
Stag Comedy team. Fri., 8:30pm. ColdTowne 
Stand-Up Fri., 10pm. Miller and Purselley Two- 
man improv. Sat., 8:30pm. Stone Cold Improv 
brings Midnight Society and the Frank Mills. Sat., 
10pm. And now there’s Free Improv Shows on 
Wednesdays! 7 & 8:30pm. 

ESTHER’S POOL 525 E. Sixth, 320-0553. 

www.esthersfollies.com . 

Esther’s Follies The popular Esther’s troupe 
brings a comedy show like none other in town, 
with topical sketches, song-and-dance numbers 
lambasting the high-and-mighty, and more, right 
there on Sixth Street. Esther’s tracks the candi- 
dates in “GOP Superstar!” with Rick Perry hound- 
ed by presidential hopefuls Herman Cain and 
Mitt Romney. And there are Ray Anderson’s non- 
partisan spectacles of magic, too! Reservations 
recommended. Thu., 8pm; Fri.-Sat., 8 & 10pm. 
$20-27 (discounts available Thursdays & Fridays 
for seniors, military). 

NEW MOVEMENT THEATER 1819 Rosewood. 

The New Movement Here’s the comedy-focused 
powerhouse that ate East Austin, generating new 
troupes like, what, every other week? Shows, 
workshops, classes, all of it. See the website for 
details, yes, but look: TNM 10 presents the 10 
best comedy sketches in the New Movement’s 
history. Thu., 8pm. Block Party Anything - that’s 
anything - goes. Thu., 9:30pm. Lucy Fri., 9pm. 
Handbomb Fri., 10:30pm. Duocity Sat., 9pm. 

Spirit Desire Sat., 10:30pm. 

VELVEETA ROOM 521 E. Sixth, 469-9116. 
www.thevelveetaroom.com. 

Andy Ritchie The funniest person in Austin! 
Seriously, the official Funniest Person in Austin 

this year, and well worth seeing if you want a night 
of gut-busting comedy. The man’s professional 
hilarity isn’t enough? Look: Kath Barbadoro and 
friends open. Sat., Nov. 19, 9:30 & 11:30pm. $5. 

It’s Always Funny with Brian Garr Of course it is 

- especially with Andy Ritchie, Maggie Maye, and 
Michael Navarette tonight. Fri., Nov. 18, 9:30pm. $5. 


BUT WAIT - THERE’S MORE! 

THE PROFESSOR: NOT DOCTOR WHO Yes, he may 
seem incredibly similar to the Doctor, but that’s just a 
coincidence. Or a hiccup in the timestream that cre- 
ated a parallel universe. See these chrono-perverted 
adventures, fully improvised by a fierce troupe under 
the direction of Justin Davis. Fridays, 8pm. Through 
Nov. 18. Institution Theater ; 3708 Woodbury ; 895- 
9580. $7. www.theinstitutiontheater.com. 

THERE’S WALDO: JERKHOLES Hour-long sketch 
revue, featuring video, live skits, and musical numbers. 
Fridays, 9:30pm, through Nov. 18. Institution Theater, 
3708 Woodbury. $5. www.theinstitutiontheater.com. 

TEEN ANGST TUESDAYS: BUFFY THE VAMPIRE 
SLAYER An episode of the cult show, performed live, 
directed by [gasp] Jordan T. Maxwell. Tuesdays, 8pm. 
Through Nov. 22. The HighBall , 1142 S. Lamar ; 
383-8309. $5. www.theinstitutiontheater.com. 

GNAP! THEATER 
LATENIGHTS: No Shame 

Theatre The most amaz- 
ing performative open 
mic in town. Fri., Nov. 18, 
10pm. $10. Saturday Night 
Special Top-notch improv 
with the Escorts and, could 
it be? Yes, it’s the manga- 
riffic death-wielders of 
Senshi Sokkyo! Sat., Nov. 

19, 10pm. $10. Salvage 
Vanguard Theater, 2803 
Manor Rd., 474-7886. 
www.gnaptheater.org. 

O COVER TO COVER: IMPROVISED MYSTERIES A 

talented troupe of Gnap! Theater improvisers create 
narratives inspired by Nancy Drew and The Hardy 
Boys? The show’s afoot! Through Nov. 19. Fri.-Sat., 
8pm. Salvage Vanguard Theater ; 2803 Manor Rd., 
474-7886. $10. www.gnaptheater.org. 



f Mf 


ONSTAGE AND BACKSTAGE: THE NUTCRACKER 

Ballet Austin dancer Orlando Julius Canova will teach 
you the “Chinese” section from the holiday ballet’s 
Act II. Then, in December, a backstage tour allows you 
to glimpse the Nutcracker preshow behind the curtain 
at the Long Center. For teens and adults with some 
ballet experience. Thu., Nov. 17, 5:45pm. Ballet Austin, 
501 W. Third, 476-9051. $40. www.balletaustin.org. 



LUNA NEGRA DANCE THEATRE Chicago’s inno 
vative dance company infuses ballet with Latin 
and Afro-Caribbean forms and rhythms. Fri., Nov. 
18, 8pm. Bass Concert Hall, 23rd Street & Robert 
Dedman Drive, UT campus , 471-1444. $10-32. 
www.texasperformingarts.org. 


IN THE SPIRIT: THE NUTCRACKER AND OTHER 
WORKS The classic story of Clara and her prince 
and the significance of the color red. Guest chore- 
ographers include Dane Burch, Emily Torgerson, and 
Brenda Tally. Nov. 18-19. Fri., 7:30pm; Sat., 2:30 & 
7:30pm. Boyd Vance Theatre at the Carver Museum, 
1165 Angelina, 246-6047. $12 ($10 children , stu- 
dents). www.metamorphosisdance.org. 

MELISSA AMIRA’S CAROUSEL CARAVAN Jeanette 
hosts this monthly shimmy, featuring a host of hot 
belly dancers in one of Austin’s coolest bars. Every 
third Saturday, 8pm. Carousel Lounge, 1110 E. 52nd, 
452-6790. Free, www.carousellounge.net. 

A NEW FUTURE, <350 NOW! This performance of three 
modern dance groups - Ballet Afrique, Diverse Space 
Youth Dance Theatre, and Diverse Space Dance Theatre 
- will involve the audience to create large-scale human 
installations. Nov. 19-20. Sat., 8pm; Sun., 5pm. Mexican 
American Cultural Center ; 600 River. Donations accepted. 
www.diversespacedance.com. 

TWO LEFT FEET 

LEARN TO DANCE TANGO, SALSA, SAMBA AND 
MORE! Thu., Nov. 17. 524-2772. Drop in, $12; four 
classes, $40. Discount for students and neighbors. 

No pre-registration needed, www.esquinatangoaustin.com. 





Scan code for 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 59 





LISTINGS 




ALM 


OPENING 

AUSTIN MANDOLIN ORCHESTRA A diverse 
repertoire of selections from Bob Wills to Dmitri 
Schostakowitsch. Sun., Nov. 20, 2pm. Lady Bird 
Johnson Wildflower Center, 4801 La Crosse, 
512/217-9970. Free, www.amandolinorchestra.com. 


O PECHA KUCHA NIGHT Good gawd, y all! Check 
this lineup: Bale Creek Allen, Connie Arismendi, 
Ashley Chiles, Herman Dyal, Alyson Fox, Will Horndy, 
Robert Kraft, Jay B. Sauceda, Katy Vine, Andrew 
Yates, Karen Yates, Mike Woolf. You want a highly 
informative and entertaining event smack in the mid- 
dle of EAST? Here. Now. Recommended. (See “Quip 
’n Slide,” p.51, for more.) Thu., Nov. 17, 8:20pm. 

916 Springdale, www.pecha-kucha.org/night/austin. 


BALCONES COMMUNITY ORCHESTRA AND 
CELLO Sun., Nov. 20, 4pm. St. Matthew’s Episcopal 
Church, 8134 Mesa, 358-8676. Free. 
www.bcorchestra.net. 

EVENTS 

EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR Here comes the 
second and final weekend of the yearly Most Major 
Art Event Evar - with dozens upon dozens of open 
studios for your delectation and shopping on the 
sunrise side of the ATX. There’s a big ol’ map (with 
Chronicle recommendations highlighting a few choice 
items) in the middle of this very issue, friend, and 
may it guide you well on your art-filled journey. 
Sat.-Sun., Nov. 12-20. www.eastaustinstudiotour.com. 


OPENING 

CHAMPION GALLERY: IDLE Abstract or represen- 
tational? Form and color merge “not to create allu- 
sions to a tangible place ... but to ones that are 
partly invented by virtue of recalled experiences” in 
Jonathan Faber’s new show. Reception: Thu., Nov. 17, 
7-9pm. Exhibition: Through Dec. 22. 800 Brazos, 
354-1035. www.championcontemporary.com . 

CLOSING 

ACCESS GALLERY: BETWEEN GENIUS AND 
MADNESS A solo show by David Lamb-Vines from 
Lubbock. Through Nov. 18. 3701 Guadalupe #103. 
454-9912. www.vsatx.org. 

LOTUS GALLERY: TALISMANIC Photography and 
sculpture by Sarah Danays. Through Nov. 19. 

1009 W. Sixth. 474-1700. www.lotusasianart.com. 


PUMP PROJECT SATELLITE: FLEX SPACE Works by 
the studio’s cadre of artists. Saturdays, noon-5 pm. 
Nov. 21. 1109 Shady, www.pumpproject.com/satellite. 

REAL GALLERY: WALL-TO-WALL MULTIMEDIA 

Through Nov. 23. Mon. -Thu., 2:30-5:30pm. 1101 
Navasota #3. 775-0458. www.realgalleryaustin.com. 

ONGOING 

ART ON 5TH: JENNY MEYER The artist's “Cool Pop" 
paintings conflate iconic cartoon characters with 
candy-colored chaos. Through Nov. 26. 1501 W. Fifth, 
481-1111. www.jennymeyerart.com. 

ARTAMICI FINE ART GALLERY Artists from 
Argentina, Mexico, Chile, and Peru. 78 San Marcos St., 
45 7-01 71. www.pablotaboadastudio.com . 

AUSTIN ART CONNECTIONS: ART THAT TELLS A 
STORY New work by seven Texas artists: Good new 
work, to be sure, and recommended. See website for 
details. 786-8721. www.austinartconnections.com. 

AUSTIN ART GARAGE Local, diverse, and eminently 
shoppable. 2200-J S. Lamar ; 351-5934. 

www.austinartgarage.com. 

AUSTIN ART SPACE: AVAA FALL SHOW The Austin 
Visual Arts Association presents multimedia artworks 
by more than 40 artists. Through Nov. 26. 7739-Q 
Northcross . www.austinartspace.com . 



Experience the Power and Beauty... 


5,000 YEARS OF CHINESE 

JADE 


Featuring Selections from the 
National Museum of History, Taiwan 
and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution 


JY1 San Antonio 

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October 1, 2011 - February 19, 2012 

www.samuseum.org | 200 West Jones Avenue | (210) 978-8100 

Disc, bi, Neolithic period, Liangzhu culture (ca. 3300 - ca. 2100 BC), Nephrite, H 6 3/4 x D 3/8 inches (17.1 x 1.0 cm). National Museum of History, Taiwan 


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AUSTIN DETAILS ART + PHOTO: ELEMENTS Group 
show exploring color, space, light, and design. 

Through Dec. 106 E. Eighth, 391-0999. 
www.austindetailsart.com. 

BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART: EL ANATSUI The 

renowned artist’s “When I Last Wrote to You About 
Africa” spans four decades and includes approxi- 
mately 60 works drawn from public and private collec- 
tions internationally. Recommended. Through Jan. 22. 
MLK & Congress, 471-7324. www.blantonmuseum.org. 

D BERMAN GALLERY: LANDSCAPES Damn it, 

David Berman. You know we’re gonna drive all the 
way out to Wimberley to see this one, because new 
works by Katie Maratta and Randy Twaddle are 

worth seeing no matter what. Through Dec. 3. 

Ill Old Kyle Rd. #100, Wimberley. 

DAVIS GALLERY: MALOU 
FLATO The “Edwards 
County” solo show fills the 
gallery with a profusion of 
overlapping, almost kaleido- 
scopic colors precisely and 
beautifully rendering Texas 
flora. Through Nov. 26. 

837 W. 12th, 477-4929. 
www.davisgalleryaustin.com. 

FAB GALLERY: TAYLOR WINN’S LARGE WORKS 

The artist uses gallons of repurposed acrylic, oil, 
Venetian plaster, and aluminum paint to create his 
oversized abstracts. Through Dec. 16. 23rd & Trinity. 

www.finearts.utexas.edu/aah/galleries. 

FINE AUSTIN LIVING: UNMASKING Masks by Peg 
Runnels. Through Jan. 15. 4238 Bee Cave Rd., 
775-7547. 

O GALLERY SHOAL CREEK: MARC BURCKHARDT 
AND GUSTAVO TORRES Cast bronze and paint on 
canvas meet in an exhibition of work by these two 





HOLIDAY CRAFT 

BAZAAR 

Free entrg, prizes, 42 vendors, food, 
unique gifts, togs, and more! 

Westoak Woods Baptist Church 
12900 Slaughter Lane 
www.westoak.org 


60 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







LISTINGS 


r rsi 

Henry Horenstein’s 


Animalia 

/ / i 

Horenstein’s series of intimate and intriguing portraits of 

u' A 

land and sea creatures. Not shot in the wild, but just as glori- 
ously captured in the nearly invisible confines of zoos and 
aquariums. These are animals you may have seen yourself, 
but if your eyes were as good as Horenstein’s camera, you’d 
never need an optometrist again. Recommended. 


Reception: Sat., Nov. 19, 6-8pm. 


Exhibition: Through Jan. 31. B. Hollyman Gaiiery, 


1202-A W. Sixth, 825-6866. 
www.bhollymangallery.com. 


acclaimed masters. Recommended. Through Dec. 3. 
2905 San Gabriel , 454-6671. 

GRAYDUCK GALLERY: WAPATUI Fifteen artists! One 
great show! K.C. Collins, Cheryl Finfrock, Karl Frey, Emily 
E. Galusha, Satch Grimley, DC Ice, Laura Jennings, 
Megan Kimber, Suchitra Mattai, and more! Through Dec. 
18. 608-C W. Monroe , 826-5334. www.grayduckgallery.com. 

HARRY RANSOM CENTER: BANNED, BURNED, 
SEIZED, AND CENSORED This is what They had 
been trying to keep away from you, children, for well- 
meaning but ultimately pathetic, fear-based reasons. 
Witness; pay attention; set the world on fire. Through 
Jan. 22. 300 W. 21st, 471-8944. www.hrc.utexas.edu. 

LA PENA: MINDSCAPES New photographs and 
paintings by Rama Tiru of Austin: East of 1-35 fame. 
227 Congress. 477-6007. www.ramatiru.com. 

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY: BRADNEY EVANS 

The artist’s “Still” comprises recent works on paper 
and a video on display in the gallery’s Project Room. 
Trompe-I’oeil so good as to make you go “WTF?”. 
Through Dec. 3. 360 Nueces #50, 215-4965. 

www.lorareynolds.com . 

LYTLE PRESSLEY CONTEMPORARY: ROI JAMES 

Witness new paintings by this master of figures and 
shadows. Through Dec. 10. 1214 W. Sixth, 917-6369. 

www.lytlepressley.com . 

PALOMA BEAUTY: CAUTIOUSLY FERAL Group show 
of Texas-based artists Adrienne Butler, Erin Dooner, 
Laura Thoms, Brad Hodgson, and others. Through 
Dec. 8. 4600 Mueller #1005. www.palomabeauty.com. 

SLUGFEST: ARTEMIO RODRIGUEZ “Printing Matters’ 
presents exquisite linocut prints by a master of the 
art, as featured in his newest book. Through Nov. 26. 
1906 Miriam , 477-7204. www.slugfestprints.com. 

STUDIO 10: AUGUSTO BROCCA New work by the 
Peruvian sculptor and painter. Through Dec. 19. 1011 
West Lynn. 236-1333. www.studiotenarts.com. 

STUDIO L GALLERY New works by Rita Marie Ross, 
Jacob Colburn, Daryl G. Colburn, Dorthy Crummer, 
and more. 2309 Thornton, www.darylgcolburn.com. 

THE GALLERY AT MUSEO: BRINGING BACK 
TRADITION Oil paintings by Eve Larson. Through Jan. 
22. 11266 Taylor Draper. 

THE OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM: TRIO Fresh art 
by Sherry Fields, Jeffy Leedy, and Tina Weitz. 1006 
Congress, 477-5961. 

UT VISUAL ARTS CENTER The Architect’s Garden 

is a new site-specific exhibition by New York-based 
artist Mika Tajima, the VAC’s fall artist-in-residence 
in the Vaulted Gallery. Through Dec. 17. Visual Arts 
Center, 23rd & Trinity. 471-1108. www.utvac.org. 

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY: JOYCE HOWELL Solo 
show of warm color abstractions. Through Nov. 26. 
1202 W. Sixth, 472-7428. www.wallyworkmangallery.com. 

CREATIVE OPPORTUNITIES 

EYES GOT IT! COMPETITION Open call for artwork. 

A panel of local judges will review the submissions in 
front of a public audience and will award one artist 
a solo exhibition at grayDUCK Gallery in 2012. Why 
not you? See website for details. Deadline: Nov. 7. 
www.salvadorcastillo.wordpress.com. 

T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST FOR THE AUSTIN 
HOSTEL See website for details! Deadline: Jan. 5. 
444-2294. www.hiaustin.org. 

ARTIST INFORMATION MEETING: PEOPLE’S 
GALLERY Tue., Nov. 22. 974-9313. Free. 
www.austincreates.com . 

CALL FOR ARTWORK: PEOPLE’S GALLERY 2012 

The city of Austin seeks submission of artwork from 
Austin artists for the 2012 “People’s Gallery” exhibit. 
Deadline: Dec. 5. 974-9313. www.austincreates.com. 


niiii 1 1 

READINGS, SIGNINGS, AND 
PERFORMANCES 

BUDDY WAKEFIELD & ANIS MOJGANI: WRITE 
BLOODY POETRY MONTH The national poetry- 
slam champions bring their fiercest spoken words 
after opening sets by Kevin Burke, Ebony Stewart, 
Da’Shade Moonbeam, Danny Strack, and others, as 
hosted by Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz. Also, aerial per- 
formances by Sky Candy. Thu., Nov. 17, 8pm. ND at 
501 Studios, 501 N. 1-35, 485-3001. $15. 
www.writebloody.eventbrite.com . 

BOOKPEOPLE READINGS Iron Man triathlete Amy 
Snyder: Hell on Two Wheels. Fri., Nov. 18, 7pm. 
Young Adult author Christopher Paolini: Inheritance. 
Sat., Nov. 19, 2pm. Bobby Bridger: Where the Tall 
Grass Grows. Tue., Nov. 22, 7pm. Linda Berdoll: 

The Darcys: The Ruling Passions. Wed., Nov. 23, 

7pm. BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar , 472-5050. 
www.bookpeople.com, 

LUNCHTIME LIT J.C. Elkins reads 0. Henry’s “The 
Purple Dress.” Fri., Nov. 18, lpm. 0. Henry Museum, 
409 E. Fifth, 472-1903. www.cityofaustin.org. 



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© ‘AMERICAN SHORT FICTION’: 
BEST OF THE BEASTS ASF teams up 
with EAST and takes over Domy Books 
(where you can see Monster Show 
6!) to feature readings by the hosts 
of local lit series Five Things, Lord 
Weary’s Reading Series, and Unstuck 
Live. Local rockers Borrisokane 
kick off the evening, the Puppet 
Improv Project brings the (faux) 
animals to romp among the beasts. 
Recommended. Sat , Nov. 19, 7pm. 
Domy Books, 913 E. Cesar Chavez, 
476-3669. www.americanshortfiction.org. 


BALLET EAST DANCE COMPANY, RODOLFO MENDEZ, DIRECTOR 

and Melissa Villarreal, associate Director present: 



Choreographies by Guest Choreographers: 

JUAN P. FLORES AND JESSICA MARTINEZ ZAMARRIPA 

Local Choregjb^Phers: Melissa Villarreal, FFailley Schwartz, Jeremy Ecker, 

Dixon P. Mena 





DECEMBER 1 


- 3, 2011 C 



DECEMBER 1-3, 2011 CURTAIN 8:00 PM. 
DECEMBER 4, 2011 CURTAIN MATINEE 2:00 PM. 
Dougherty Arts Center 
1110 Barton Springs Road 
Adults $12.00 

Children & Senior Citizens $8.00 


FOR TICKET INFO: 

474-TIXS OR 385-2838, MENDESTEIN@HOTMAIL.COM 
WWW.BALLETEAST.ORG 

This project is co-sponsored by Ballet East Dance Company 

AND FUNDED IN PART BY THE CITY OF AUSTIN THROUGH THE CULTURAL ARTS 
DIVISION AND BY A GRANT FROM TEXAS COMMISSION ON THE ARTS. 


A 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 61 




LISTINGS 


NAOMI SHIHAB NYE The 

author reads from her 
There Is No Long Distance 
Now: Very Short Stories and 
Transfer: Poems. Highly rec- 
ommended. Mon., Nov. 21, 

7pm. BookWoman, 5501 N. 

Lamar Ste. 105-A, 472-2785. 
www.ebookwoman.com . 

BOOK GROUPS 

BOOK CLUBS? Where book- 
ish folk gather - in a coffee 
shop, say, or a bookstore or 
a library - to discuss what they’ve been reading? Yes, 
we have a few of those listed online each week. 
BOOKPEOPLE CLUBS Happy Hour at the HighBall: 
Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain. Thu., Nov. 17, 
7pm. Not Just Another Teen Book Club: Geektastic by 
Holly Black. Sat., Nov. 19, lpm. This Book Could Be 
Your Life with Chuck Eddy and his Rock and Roll Always 
Forgets. Sun., Nov. 20, 5pm. Ludicrous Speed: Ringworld 
by Larry Niven. Mon., Nov. 21, 7pm. BookPeople, 

603 N. Lamar, 472-5050. www.bookpeople.com. 

OPEN MICS 

OPEN MICS Austin Poetry Slam Tuesdays, 8pm. 

29th Street Ballroom, 2906 Fruth, 480-9562 . 
Multimedia Poetry Wednesdays, 6:30pm. Thrice, 

909 W. Mary, 447-9743. Fair Bean Fridays, 5-7:30pm. 
Fair Bean Coffee, 2210-1 S. First, 444-BEAN. Full 
English Tea Room Thom hosts. Saturdays, 6-9pm. 
2000 Southern Oaks. 240-2748 . Spoken & Heard 
Sundays, 7-10pm. Kick Butt Coffee, 5775 Airport #725, 
454-5425. More listed online! 

VSA TEXAS OPEN MIC NIGHT Sat., Nov. 19. 
454-9912. suggested donation $5. www.vsatx.org. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

RIC UP YER EARS “i am not the man to cast away 
fear, i am not the man in the nick of time, hero the 
fix that kills." i & i & i have no want of an i, no want 
of a letting go, of being held, of dust, the pearl is in 
the moon for its being silent & some stirring thing 
still rounds itself in this soft body to follow the tide. 
Namaste. Stir. 


poem of the issue 

The woman who stepped out, stretching, 
was beautiful, not like a swan’s wing 
that can break a man’s arm, but like 
my daughter, a woman nearly, who has 
blue tints of her own and is growing daily 
into the arms of emperors who tell her 
you will live at peace long after he 
has left at the bottom of his half-sheet 
his best approximation of a name. 

- Kurt Heinzelman, from 
The Names They Found There 



CHRISTMAS AFFAIR MARKET Help raise money for 
the Junior League of Austin by perusing the more 
than 200 vendors. Thu. -Sun., Nov. 17-20. Palmer 
Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Rd., 467-8982. 

$12. www.jlaustin.org. 

O RAINFOREST PARTNERSHIP’S NIGHT IN THE 
CLOUDS Dinner, drinks, music, auctions, and your 
donation help deter deforestation in Latin America. 
Thu., Nov. 17, 6-9pm. Barr Mansion, 10463 Sprinkle, 
371-8770. $100. www.rainforestpartnership.org. 

TRAVIS COUNTY GREEN PARTY MEETING Thu., 

Nov. 17, 6:30pm. Carver Branch Library , 1161 
Angelina, 974-1010. Free, www.tcgp.org. 

INSIDE BOOKS PROJECT WORK PARTY Help sup 
ply books to inmates all this weekend, which also 
happens to be the anniversary of the Inside Books 
Project. Thu. -Sat., Nov. 17-19. Space 12, 3121 E. 12th, 
64 7-4803. www.insidebooksproject.org. 

SUSTAINABLE URBAN DESIGN CONFERENCE Fri., 
Nov. 18, 7:30am-lpm. AT&T Conference Center , 

1900 University Ave., 404-1900, 877/744-8822. Free. 
http://bit.ly/sFpiEi. 

SERVICE AUSTIN DAYS Sign up online and partici- 
pate in the growing tradition of volunteering the week- 


end before Thanksgiving. More than 50 projects will 
take place during this time, including beautification, 
building wheelchair ramps, helping the homeless, and 
more. Fri. -Sun., Nov. 18-20. 936-1149. serviceaustin@ 
serviceaustin.org, www.serviceaustin.org. 

DOWNTOWN SERVICE PROVIDER CRAWL It s like a 
pub crawl but with no inebriation and a lot more civic 
responsibility. Follow the probable steps of a home- 
less individual as you tour the Trinity Center, Front 
Steps (ARCH), Salvation Army, and Caritas. RSVP on 
the Facebook page. Fri., Nov. 18, 10am-2pm. Austin 
Resource Center for the Flomeless, 500 E. Seventh, 
610-3500. Free, www.hhweekaustin.com. 

SAMI SHOW MARKETPLACE Crafts, art, recycled 
items, and a slew of gift ideas for the unique person 
in your life. Sat., Nov. 19, 10am-5pm; Sun., Nov. 20, 
llam-4:30pm. Dell Diamond, 3400 E. Palm Valley Blvd ., 
Round Rock, 512/441-7133. $5. www.samishow.com. 

TEXAS SOCIALIST CONFERENCE Socialists love 
the 99%, and while you wouldn’t be getting in on the 
ground floor, it’s never too late to convert and learn 
the ways of Karl Marx. Sat., Nov. 19, noon-6:30pm; 
Sun., Nov. 20, noon-l:30pm. Mezes Rm. 1.306, UT 
campus, 222-7476. $5-20. www.isoaustin.blogspot.com. 

ORUN CENTER ANNIVERSARY After two years of 
serving the Eastside community, the center celebrates 
with dance performances and live tunes all night. 

Sat., Nov. 19, 4pm-lam. Orun Center of Cultural Arts, 
1401-B Cedar , 731-4584. $5-10. 
www.projectabundantlife.org. 

O HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING Get in on live music, 
kids’ activities, carolers, and more before the lighting 
of the 40-foot tree at 6pm and a performance from 
The Voice finalist Nakia. Sat., Nov. 19, 6-10pm. The 
Domain, 11410 Century Oaks Terrace, 795-4230. Free. 
SPANKSGIVING Black Widow Burlesque is feeling 
the holiday spirit and wants to give you something to 
feast your eyes on. In addition to various burlesque 
troupes, there will be comedy, acrobats, and more 
entertainment to help build an appetite. Sat., Nov. 19, 
9pm-l:30am. ND at 501 Studios, 501 N. 1-35, 485-3001. 
$20 ($15 advance), www.blackwidowburlesque.com. 

TINPLATE TRACKERS TRAIN CLUB Come watch 
the choo-choos and inspire the next generation to 
keep this historic hobby alive and well. You might 
even be allowed to sit behind the controls if you’re 


kind enough to the tip jar. Saturdays, noon-5pm, and 
Sundays, l-5pm , through Jan. 15. 117 Lavaca (next to 
III Forks). Donations appreciated, www.trainweb.org/ttat. 



O EMPTY BOWL PROJECT Bring money for the 
Capital Area Food Bank of Texas and get a bowl of 
soup prepared by a local restaurant. The bowls are 
donated by Central Texas potters and are yours to 
keep when you’re done. You can also bid on celebrity- 
signed bowls from the likes of Anthony Bourdain 
and Smokey Robinson. Live music aids your diges- 
tion. Sun., Nov. 20, llam-3pm. The Marchesa Hall & 
Theatre, 6406 N. 1-35 #3100, 633-3309. $20 dona- 
tion. www.austinemptybowl.org. 

PEACE CORPS GATHERING The Heart of Texas 
Peace Corps Association hosts this potluck for past 
and future volunteers and their families. Sun., Nov. 

20, ll:30am-3pm. Girl Scout Cabin off Columbus Drive 
in Zilker Park. Free, www.hotpca.org. 




hfcOMi ShIHAB NyF 


WANT THEM? 

I received a lovely 
e-missive from my 
buddy, “After a 
Fashion” columnist 
Stephen MacMillan 
Moser: “Dear Kate, As 
you know, I’m being 
neutered this week. It 
seems like such a 
shame to let such a 
large lovely set of balls 
go to waste. They’ve 
served me well, and I 
was wondering if you 
might like to have 
them? Not that you 
don’t already have 
balls, figuratively, but 
now you can sport a 
pair of real ones ....” I 
get twerky emails like 
this and a gigantic grin 
spreads across my 

face like a very good bad rash, mildly offsetting my sadness 
that my pal is going through some rough waters. The holidays 
have us in their sights. There is no escape. You’ll think of fam- 
ily. You’ll think of the ones you love. Loved. The ones who 
loved you. The ones who said they loved you. The ones you 
lost. The ones you pushed away. And you will also think of 
awesome stuff. Like dreidels. Like figgy pudding. Like tamales. 
Like stars. Like elves. Like turkeys and turtles and troglodytes. 
Like the Calle Limon light show. Like gay bars with free meals. 
Like revolution now. Like love. So much love. I love you, buddy. 
Oh, yeah, and you readers, too; can’t help but love you, too. 



hi ■■!*) IiMhM 

TEXAS EXES LGBT NETWORK HAPPY HOUR 

Hook ’em up with fellow cutie Q Texas Exes. 
Thu., Nov. 17, 5pm. J Black’s, 710-B W. Sixth, 
433-6954. Free. Igbt@alumni.utexas.edu, 
www.texasexes.org/lgbt. 

CINEKINK 2011 Smut City and F*Bomb bring 
this traveling tour of tantalizing treats - soft- 
core shorts to get in your jorts. They promise 
these to be date friend ly/hard-R as 
opposed to their regular X-rated fare. 

Thu., Nov. 17, 8pm. 29th Street 
Ballroom, 2906 Fruth , 480- 
9562. $10 ($7, advance). 
www.cinekink.com, www. 
fbombforever.com/smut-city. 

DJ BOOGAR WON Nah, 
you didn’t lose the war 
on allergies. It’s just a 
DJ. Thu., Nov. 17, 9pm. 

Bernadette’s, 2039 
Airport Blvd. 

THE JIGGLEWATTS 
PRESENT ‘DIRTY 
MARTINI AND THE 
NEW BURLESQUE’ This 
traveling doc features NYC 
luminaries Murray Hill, the 
World Famous *BOB*, and 
Dirty Martini. The Austin stop 
spotlights Queertini Time and the 
rest of our lovely jiggly puffs! Fri., Nov. 18, 8 
& 10:30pm. 29th Street Ballroom, 2906 Fruth, 
480-9562. $15, general; $20, VIP front-row 
cocktail tables, coco.lectric@gmail.com, 
www.thejigglewattsburlesque.com. 

FINGERPISTOL AT RUSTY’S The Chronicle’s 
own Luv Doc Dan, the sultry Suzee Brooks, 
and pals point that thing right atcha. Fri., Nov. 
18, 9:30-ll:30pm. Rusty’s, 405 E. Seventh, 
482-9002. www.fingerpistol.com. 


RV If ATF V 


BUSY TOWN GALLERY LAUNCH The East 
Austin Studio Tour Blue 20 Stop is the hairy- 
beast-cult-parlor-pirate-party featuring the art- 
ness of Aaron Flynn, Billy Beasty, and Annie 
Simpson. DJ Fine & Dandy (yours truly and GP 
blogger Andy) and Devaki Knowles aka Fun 
Loving Photos spin and snap. Sat., Nov. 19, 
7-10pm. Maison d’Etoile, 2109 E. Cesar Chavez, 
323/702-6061. www.facebook.com/busytownllc, 
www.eastaustinstudiotour.com. 

MURDER SHE WROTE DJ Pauly P & Young 

Breezy spin for the Austin Harm Reduction 
Coalition. Sat., Nov. 19, 8pm-lam. 
Bernadette’s, 2039 Airport Blvd. 
$5 suggested donation. 
www.austinharmreduction.org. 



MESSER. 


HOW TO STUFF A 
WILD TURKEY Lone 
Star Leathermen and 
drag family Castle 
LittleMore (of which, 

I in the interest of 
full disclosure, this 
columnist is Honorary 
Mistress for Life) 
and MC Miss Kitty 
Litter host this grateful 
dragstavaganza to ben- 
efit the Mona Littlemore 
College Fund. Sat., Nov. 19, 
9-llpm. Town N Country, 

1502 W. Ben White, 445-9122. 
www.townncountry.co. 

MISS DRUNK DIAL PAGEANT 2011 Who will 
be crowned the Queen of Urrrrrrrp? Only the 
judges (of which yours truly is one) will know fo 
sho. Fun and frolic with Emily, Jodi, Chainbow, 
and more. Sat., Nov. 19, 9pm. Volstead Lounge, 
1500 E. Sixth, 680-0532. 

SUNDAY FUNDAY A mere $5 gets you a heap- 
ing helping of beef or poultry plus all the fix- 
ings and drink specials. Sundays, 2pm. Rusty’s, 
405 E. Seventh, 482-9002. 


SHEGOTTA MUSTACHE MEMORIAL Austin 
Babtist Women salute the life of drag enter- 
tainer Greg Smith with what Greg would’ve 
loved best. Sun., Nov. 20, 6pm. Iron Bear ; 121 
W. Eighth, 482-8993. $5 suggested donation. 
www.theironbear.com . 

QUEERFUNK DISCOPUNK! Darlings Phatty 
Matty and Chainsaw Hammell powwow the 
slinging of drinks and tunes - a loverly a way 
to start/ end your week. Sundays, 8pm-12mid. 
Bernadette’s, 2039 Airport. 

CAP CITY Q’S AUTUMN MAGIC Gay Place 
highly endorses this monthly gathering of 
friendly LGBTs (but no tease). Mon., Nov. 21, 
7pm. Dragon Gate by Phoenix, 3801 Capital of 
TX Hwy. N. Ste. J-180, 732-7278. Free. jonas@ 
capitalcityqsocials.com, www.capitalcityqsocials.com. 

MAIL ART WITH DANDY It’s a craft night to 1) 
make and send cards to incarcerated queers 
and folks living with HIV/AIDS, 2) get crafty 
with new pals, and 3) stick it to the man. Tue., 
Nov. 22 during Thanksgiving week; otherwise, 
Wednesdays, 7-10pm. Bernadette’s, 2039 
Airport Blvd. www.bernadettesbar.com, 
www.austinchronicle.com/gay. 

SCOTT KENNEDY The Gay Comedy Jam co- 
founder asked and told more than 40 times 
while entertaining our troops in Iraq. Wed., 

Nov. 23, 8pm; Fri. & Sat., Nov. 25-26. Cap City 
Comedy Club, 8120 Research #100, 467-2333. 
www.comicscott.com . 

FREE THANKSGIVING BY ROSE It s a holiday 
tradition: home for the holidays, a meal with 
family. Thank you, OCH! Thu., Nov. 24, 2pm. 
Oilcan Harry’s , 211 W. Fourth, 320-8823. 

THANKSGIVING POTLUCK BT provides the 
turkey. Dinner with the fam! Thu., Nov. 24, 2pm. 
’Bout Time, 9601 N. 1-35, 832-5339. 


Send gay bits to gayplace@austinchronicle.com. 

See the full array of Gay Place listings at 
austinchronicle.com/gay. 


62 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 






6TH EDITION 



NOVEMBER 29 N 

7 -9PM 

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PRODUCTIONS 


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LISTINGS 



l,06lst in a series . Collect them 
all . Day Trips, Vol. 2, a book of 
“Day Trips, ” is available for 
$8.95, plus $3.05 for shipping, 
handling, and tax. Mail to: 
Day Trips, PO Box 33284, 
South Austin, TX 78704. 


Day Trips 


The Franklin County Museum in Mount 
Vernon holds a treasure trove of artifacts 
and stories. Very few small-town deposi- 
tories can match the small northeastern 
Texas town’s unique and well-presented 
collection of rare sports memorabilia and 
natural history items. 

In 2006, Don Meredith returned to his 
home town and received a hero’s welcome 
at the opening of “The Don Meredith 
Exhibit” in the town’s former fire station. The 
Meredith family donated hundreds of items 
from “Dandy” Don’s career as a Dallas 
Cowboy and sports announcer, including his 
1971 Emmy and personal photos. 

Meredith, who passed away in 2010, 
grew up in Mount Vernon, and the muse- 
um is two blocks from where his parents 
once owned a dry-goods store. 

A.W. Nations never knew Meredith, 
but their stories are intertwined in the 
museum. An amateur naturalist in South 
Texas, Nations purchased a collection of 
bird eggs at an estate sale in 1947 that 
was donated to the museum. Collected 
from 1880 to 1900, the 222 eggs 
include three from birds now extinct. The 
Smithsonian Institution was so impressed 
with the collection that it helped design 
the climate-controlled displays. 

The Franklin County Museum is at 
201 S. Kaufman in Mount Vernon. The 
hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 
10am to 4pm, but it is recommended to 
call 903/537-7012 to be sure the door 
will be unlocked. 


I Pfi I II m 

STARGAZING AT THE ROUGHS Explore the galaxy 
through the Dobsonian telescope with trained 
astronomers. Bring lawn chairs, refreshments, and 
warm clothing. Fri., Nov. 18, 8:30-10pm. McKinney 
Roughs Nature Park, Bastrop, 512/303-5073. 

Free, www.lcra.org/mckinneyroughs. 

WALKWAY OF LIGHTS Stroll through a lighted 
wonderland as 2 million twinkling lights fill 
the park and reflect off the lake. Santa visits 
Thursday through Saturday evenings. Evenings, 
Nov. 18-Jan. 2, 6-10pm. Lakeside Park, Marble 
Falls, 830/693-4449. Free, www.marblefalls.org. 

POINSETTIA CELEBRATION Tour the green 
houses filled with different varieties and sizes of 
poinsettias, along with other plants, miniseminars 
on gardening, arts & crafts, and special activi- 
ties. Sat.-Sun., Nov. 19-20, 10am-4pm. Ellison’s 
Greenhouse, Bren ham, 888/273-6426. 
www.ellisonsgreenhouses.com. 

NIGHT IN OLD PEARL CITY In 1932, W.G. 
Hagens had the community around his store 
and saloon named after the San Antonio beer 
that was popular with his customers. The event 
takes visitors to local historic sites like St. Ann’s 
Church, Hermann Sons Cemetery, the old school, 
and the Stagecoach Inn and ends with dinner, 
dance, and a silent auction. Sat. Nov. 19. Turner 
Hall, Hochheim, 6 miles west of Yoakum, 
361/293-2309. www.yoakumareachamber.com. 


FOOD FOR THOUGHT: DUST We don’t like to call it 
dust; we call it superfine particles, because, well, 
they’re superfine. Learn where dust comes from, 
what’s so cool about it, and what you can do to avoid 
it. Mon., Nov. 21, 7pm. Trinity United Methodist 
Church, 4001 Speedway, 459-5835. Free. 
www.meetup.com/cfiaustin. 

CAREER FAIR Come in flip-flops and a tank top if you 
want to be comfortable, but dress to impress if you want 
an actual job. Bring your resume for review or just start 
making it rain with curricula vitae. Tue., Nov. 22, 11am- 
2pm. Holiday Inn Austin Midtown, 6000 Middle Fiskville, 
Free, www.coasttocoastcareerfairs.com . 


Em 


BIG & LITTLE ADVENTURES: POLLINATION 
SENSATION Get your 3- to 4-year-old dressed for 
outdoor adventure and meet an animal friend, 
enjoy a craft, and explore the world outside your 
front door. Pre-registration is required. Thu., 

Nov. 17, 9am. Austin Nature & Science Center, 

301 Nature Center Dr., 974-3888. $10. 
www.austintexas.gov/ansc. 

KIDS BOOK CLUB Little ones between 3 and 5 are 
invited for a story followed by an activity that sticks 
to the tale’s theme. First and third Thursdays, 9:30am. 
French Legation Museum, 802 San Marcos St., 
472-8180. Free, www.frenchlegationmuseum.org. 


KIDS IN SPACE Does your kid want to be a meter- 
ologist? How about a weatherman on Saturn? 

Learn about how weather works here on Earth, as 
well as the crazy storms one can expect on other 
planets. Thu., Nov. 17, 4pm. Cepeda Library, 

651 N. Pleasant Valley , 974-7400. Free. 
www.cityofaustin.org/library. 

FAMILY FUN NIGHTS Kids and parents are invited 
to explore the night sky via telescope and activities. 
Pre-registration is required. Fri., Nov. 18, 6:30-8:30pm. 
Austin Nature & Science Center, 301 Nature Center 
Dr., 974-3888. $5. www.austintexas.gov/ansc. 

MULTICULTURAL SANTA ARRIVAL PARADE It might 
be early, but the kids refuse to wait. It’s time for 
Santa to arrive at the mall, and he’s coming with an 
entourage of capoeira dancers, African drums, and 
more. When the fanfare dies down, pictures will be 
taken. Sat., Nov. 19, 10am. Highland Mall, 

6001 Airport , 454-9656. Free, www.highlandmall.com. 

A VERY FAIRY CHRISTMAS CAROL Characters from 
kids’ theatre productions past - including Penelope 
the Party-Pooping Fairy, Peter Pan, and others - come 
together to help Tiny Tim learn about sharing during 
the holiday season. Perfect for kids between the 
ages of 4 and 10. Nov. 19-Dec. 18, Saturdays, 10am; 
Sundays, 2pm. Scottish Rite Theatre, 207 W. 18th , 
472-5436. $10 ($8, children), www.srct.org. 

LATINITAS FREE SATURDAY MEDIA CAMPS 

Latinitas continues its Saturday camp series with 
this course in nature photography. For girls in third 


through eighth grades. Register online. Sat., Nov. 19, 
10:30am. St. John Library, 7500 Blessing, 447-4440 
xl37. Free, www.laslatinitas.com. 

GINGERBREAD HOUSE-RAISING Learn something 
about the architecture of the Neill-Cochran House 
before attempting to re-create it using gingerbread. 
Kids between the ages of 6 and 11 can also make 
a small, edible house to take home. Call to regis- 
ter and wear clothes that could use some frosting 
on them. Sat., Nov. 19, 11am. Neill-Cochran House 
Museum, 2310 San Gabriel, 478-2335. $10 materials 
fee. www.nchmuseum.org. 

ECHO FAMILY CARNIVAL Food, games, face-paint- 
ing, clowns, and other carnival staples, but as the 
final event for Hunger & Homelessness Awareness 
Week, there will also be a chance for your kids to 
learn about and do their small part to help the home- 
less. Sat., Nov. 19, llam-2pm. St. Ignatius Martyr 
Catholic School, 126 W. Oltorf, 587-3997. Free. 
www.hhweekaustin.com. 

MONSTER FAMILIES IMPROV These monsters don’t 
believe in humans, even the ones in the audience. 
The young audience members will have to help, so 
be prepared to offer suggestions. Sundays, 2pm. The 
Hideout Theatre, 617 Congress, 971-3311. $7. 
www.flyingtheatremachine.com. 

I I I I hi 

THE HOME TEAMS 

© TEXAS STARS Bring a teddy bear to toss on the 
ice at Saturday’s game for Operation Blue Santa. Vs. 
Houston: Sat., Nov. 19, 7pm. Vs. Chicago: Wed., Nov. 

23, 7:30pm. Cedar Park Center ; 2100 Avenue of the 
Stars, Cedar Park, 512/600-5000. $10-70. 
www.texasstarshockey.com . 

VOLLEYBALL STATE TOURNEY Three day tourna 
ment held in San Marcos featuring the best high 
school setters and spikers in the state. Thu., Nov. 

17, lpm; Fri., Nov. 18, 9am; Sat., Nov. 19, 9am. Texas 
State Strahan Coliseum, 700 Aquarena, 245-2180. 
$5-25. www.uiltexas.org/volleyball/state. 

© UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS Football Vs. Kansas 
State: Sat., Nov. 19, 7pm. Memorial Stadium. 

ST. EDWARD’S UNIVERSITY Men’s Basketball Vs. 

A&M-Kingsville: Thu., Nov. 17, 7pm. Vs. SE Oklahoma 
State: Sat., Nov. 19, 7pm. Women’s Basketball Vs. 
Tarleton State: Sat., Nov. 19, 2pm. Vs. Angelo State: 
Tue., Nov. 22, 6pm. www.stedwards.edu/athletics. 

TEXAS STATE Football Vs. Prairie View A&M: Sat., 
Nov. 5, 3pm. Women’s Golf Challenge at Onion Creek 
Tournament: Mon., Nov. 7-8, all day. Onion Creek Club. 

www.txstatebobcats.com . 

CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY Men’s Basketball Vs. 

Trinity: Fri., Nov. 18, 5pm. athletics.concordia.edu. 

SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Men’s Basketball 

Vs. Claremont McKenna-Harvey Mudd-Scripps: Fri., 
Nov. 18, 7pm. Vs. Schreiner: Sat., Nov. 19, 4pm. Vs. 
Mary Hardin-Baylor: Tue., Nov. 22, 7:30pm. Women’s 
Basketball Vs. Mary Hardin-Baylor: Tue., Nov. 22, 
5:30pm. www.southwesternpirates.com. 

RECREATION & FITNESS 

YOUTH SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT GOLF TOURNEY 

Mon., Nov. 21, 10am. Twin Creeks Country Club, 

Cedar Park, 512/401-5508. $100 per person. 

www.cedarparktx.us/cp/pr_events_golf.aspx. 

TEXAS OUTDOORS WOMAN NETWORK is open 
to ladies of any age who are interested in outdoor 
fun. Tue., Nov. 22, 6pm. LCRA Red Bud Complex, 
3601 Lake Austin Blvd ., Rm. RBC 225. 

www.townaustin.org. 

RUNS, WALKS, & RIDES 

O THUNDERCLOUD SUBS TURKEY TROT Thu., Nov. 

24, 9:30am. $20, untimed 5-mile/l-mile walk; $28, 
timed 5-mile; $8, Stepping Stone School Kids K. Long 
Center for the Performing Arts, 701 W. Riverside, 
524-2953. www.thundercloud.com/index.php/trot-home. 

NATIONAL EATING DISORDERS ASSOCIATION 
WALK will include a keynote speech from Jenni 
Schaefer as well as the walk. Sat., Nov. 19, 10am. 
$20, adults; $10, kids. Mueller Lake Park, Mueller 
Blvd. www.austinnedawalk.com. 

© WARRIOR DASH Two-day extreme race spanning 
3 miles of rough terrain and 12 super-challenging 
obstacles to be followed by food, drinks, and live 
music. Sat., Nov. 19-20. Rusty’s Walnut Creek Ranch , 
394 Pleasant Chapel Rd. www.warriordash.com. 

VERN’S NO FRILLS 5K RACE NO. 32 Sat., Nov. 19, 
8am. Berry Springs Park & Preserve, 1801 CR 152, 
Georgetown, 724-3774. $1. www.noexcusesrunning.com. 


FIRE RELIEF BIKE RIDE A five-hour ride through 
the lovely Hill Country. Sat., Nov. 19, 10am. Poodie’s 
Hilltop Roadhouse, 22308 Hwy. 71 W., Spicewood, 
512/961-9630. Free. 

LIL’ LONGHORN 5K Sat., Nov. 19, 9am. $20, individu- 
al; $30, couples; $40, family. Festival Beach, 

2101 Bergman, www.lillonghorn5k.eventbrite.com. 

WILDCARDS 

Q PRO BEACH VOLLEYBALL TEXAS SOLO 
CHAMPIONSHIP This all-day tourney will feature 
world champions Jen Kessy and April Ross, free clin- 
ics for kids and adults, and amateurs can play for 
free in the mornings. Sat., Nov. 19, 10am. Aussie’s Grill 
& Beachbar ; 306 Barton Springs Rd., 480-0952. Free. 
www.soloworldwidevolleyball.com. 

AMY SNYDER BOOKSIGNINGS lron(wo)man veteran 
is doing a booksigning blitz through Austin promot- 
ing her book Hell on Two Wheels, which documents 
the extreme bike competition Race Across America. 
Barnes & Noble: Thu., Nov. 17, 7pm. BookPeople: 

Fri., Nov. 18, 7pm. 603 N. Lamar. 


UT Women's 
Basketball 


BY MARK FAGAN 



While the NBA lockout continues 
with only mild concern from the sports- 
loving populace, the University of Texas 
Longhorns (and the Austin Toros) play on. 
The UT men handled Rhode Island 100-90 
last Tuesday at the Drum behind J’Covan 
Brown’s career-high 35 points. The 
women’s team takes the court this Sunday 
vs. Alcorn State following Monday’s 73-65 
defeat of Southern Louisiana. Senior 
Ashley Gayle (above) swatted five of UT’s 
nine blocks in that game, bringing her 
career total to 289, tying her with Ellen 
Bayer for the school’s all-time record. With 
the Spurs, Mavericks, and Rockets away, 
come see the Horns play. 


Vs. Alcorn State: Sun., Nov. 20, 
2pm. Frank Erwin Center, 
1701 Red River. $8-16. 
www.t exass ports.com. 


64 theaustin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







LISTINGS 


Soccer Watch 

BY NICK BARBARO 


The Austin Aztex introduced their new coach on Wednesday: Paul Dalglish, a 34-year- 
old Glaswegian who played at the highest levels in Scotland and England, won the MLS Cup 
with the Houston Dynamo in 2006, and has coached for the Dynamo and Tampa Bay 
Rowdies before becoming director of soccer at the Lake Travis Youth Association and their 
Dynamo Juniors program earlier this year. His father, Kenny Dalglish, was one of the best 
strikers of his generation, beloved by fans of Scotland, Celtic, and Liverpool alike and the 
current Liverpool coach. The Aztex also announced that they’ll field a Super 20 youth 
team, along with the flagship PDL squad. Info on tryouts, and a stadium announcement, 
should follow anon; see that news here, or at www.austinaztex.com. 

The UT Longhorns and St. Edward’s Hilltoppers both bowed out of the NCAAs with 
1-0 first-round losses last weekend. 

The MLS Cup final - Houston Dynamo at Los Angeles Galaxy - is Sunday, Nov. 20, 
8pm on ESPN. As much as I admire the Dynamo, I can’t see LA losing at home for the first 
time all year... The next-to-last games in the European Champions League group stage 
are this Tuesday-Wed nesday, Nov. 22-23 (live on FSC, 1:45pm). 

The U.S. national team had their first encouraging offensive performance of the 
Jurgen Klinsmann era, beating Slovenia, 3-2, on Tuesday. That same day, Ireland, 
Portugal, Croatia, and the Czech Republic became the final teams to qualify for the 
2012 Euro Championships (the strongest field of any tournament, ever); Argentina got 
untracked in World Cup Qualifying; and tiny Antigua & Barbuda, featuring a nucleus of 
players from USL PRO, won their qualifying group over favored Haiti to advance into next 
summer’s semifinal WCQ round against the USA, Jamaica, and Guatemala. Go Hoppers! 


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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 65 









Melancholia 


D: Lars von Trier; with Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kiefer Sutherland, Alexander 
Skarsgard, Brady Corbet, Charlotte Rampling, John Hurt, Stellan Skarsgard, Udo Kier, 

Cameron Spurr. (R, 136 min.) 

It's the end of the world, and Lars von Trier knows 
it. The famously depressed Danish filmmaker, who 
is also the cinema's reigning enfant terrible, brings 


his vision of human annihilation to the 
screen in this visually stunning, thematical- 
ly rich, perversely humorous, and sublimely 
virtuosic film. Melancholia is the best film 
of von Trier’s storied career. 

In the most generic sense, Melancholia 
is a disaster film (which is certainly not 
the same thing as saying it’s a disaster, as 
many of von Trier’s detractors might claim). 
Earth faces destruction from collision with 
a planet named Melancholia, which has 
only recently been discovered because it’s 
been hiding behind the sun. It’s scientifically 
dubious, I know, but von Trier’s 
ominous visual rendering of the 
looming wrecking ball in the 
sky is potent enough to allow 
suspension of disbelief for the 
next two hours. Melancholia 
begins with the ending, giv- 
ing us further “proof,” if necessary, of the 
impending disaster to come. Kirsten Dunst 
stands alone in a field, unmoving, as birds 
fall down around her and the haunting 
music of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde plays 
on the soundtrack. This tableau is followed 
by other dire but inscrutable images that 
only make complete sense in retrospect. 

The first half of Melancholia is devoted 
to the wedding reception of Justine (Dunst) 
and Michael (Alexander Skarsgard) to which 
the couple arrives a couple hours late due 
to trouble with their limo. The lavish gather- 
ing is held at the castled estate of Justine’s 
sister Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and her 
husband, John (Kiefer Sutherland). That 
these two sisters look and sound nothing 
alike fits with the story’s metaphor about 


planets colliding. Although Justine appears 
to be an exquisite bride with a luxurious 
dress and beaming smile, she suffers from 
a depression so overwhelming that she 
must occasionally slip away from her party 
to nap or soak in a tub or engage in sponta- 
neous and quite public sex with a man she 
just met. Von Trier’s busy, handheld camera, 
however, has a grand time at the affair, find- 
ing humor in the various guests and their 
peccadilloes, and calling to mind similar 
observations from The Celebration by his 
countryman Thomas Vinterberg. 

The second part of 
Melancholia turns its focus to 
Claire and takes up a short 
time after the wedding deba- 
cle, when news reports about 
the impending natural disas- 
ter mount. Claire’s state of 
mind grows frenzied, while Justine declares 
placidly: “The Earth is evil. We are alone.” 
Underscored by the refrains from Tristan und 
Isolde, Melancholia also dips its toes into the 
waters of German Romanticism with its con- 
fluence of the rational and spiritual, the man- 
made world and the natural environment. In 
this regard, the film also seems reflective of 
The Tree of Life, out earlier this year. 

Dunst’s performance is a thing of calm 
beauty and mired grit, fully deserving of the 
Best Actress Award she received for this 
work at Cannes. The entire supporting cast 
also proves to be a delight, even in their 
obstinacy and oddities. If von Trier seemed 
as though he was at a creative dead end by 
the time of his last film, Antichrist, he has 
reawakened, ironically, with Melancholia. 



ARTHUR CHRISTMAS 

D: Sarah Smith; with the voices of James McAvoy, Hugh 
Laurie, Bill Nighy, Jim Broadbent, Imelda Staunton. (PG, 

100 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. From England’s 
Aardman animation mavericks ( Wallace & 
Gromit) comes this latest bid for status as a 
yuletide screen classic. Santa and his dysfunc- 
tional family run a high-tech operation under- 
neath the North Pole, which helps explain 
many practical questions, such as why the 
workshop can’t be viewed on Google Earth. 
(Opens Wednesday.) - Marjorie Baumgarten 
Tinseltown North 

THE DESCENDANTS 

D: Alexander Payne; with George Clooney, Shailene Woodley, 
Amara Miller, Judy Greer, Beau Bridges, Matthew Lillard, Nick 
Krause, Robert Forster. (R, 115 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. Alexander 
Payne’s first feature film since 2004’s 
Sideways finds George Clooney in his most 
un-Clooney-like performance yet. After his wife 
suffers an accident that leaves her comatose 
in the opening moments of the film, Clooney’s 
Matt King is left to become the primary par- 
ent of his two willful daughters. The film also 
makes great use of its Hawaiian setting. 

(Opens Wednesday.) - Marjorie Baumgarten 
Alamo Lamar 

HAPPY FEET TWO 

D: George Miller; with the voices of Elijah Wood, Robin 
Williams, Hank Azaria, Alecia “Pink” Moore, Brad Pitt, Matt 
Damon, Ava Acres, Sofia Vergara, Common, Hugo Weaving, 
Richard Carter, Anthony LaPaglia. (PG, 100 min.) 

There’s lots of peril but not much story in 
this sequel to 2006’s animated-penguin block- 
buster. Although appealing to look at, Happy 
Feet Two is noisy, busy, and unable to spark 
much emotional involvement in the viewer 
other than fear for the characters’ well-being 
and a touch of existential angst by way of a 
couple of krill - the newly introduced char- 
acters voiced by Brad Pitt and Matt Damon. 
There’s also a hint of a message about global 
warming in that the penguins’ plight may be 
due to climate change, but that conclusion is 
merely implied rather than spelled out. 

The sequel opens with a big song-and- 
dance number in which young Erik (Ava 
Acres) is unable to dance but is encouraged 
to do so by his mom Gloria (singer Pink 
taking over for the late Brittany Murphy) 
and dad Mumble (Elijah Wood), who were 
the central characters in the original. Erik 
wants to find his own thing that he’s good at 
instead of joining the conformist chorus line, 
so he soon takes off with some friends for 
lands beyond. Robin Williams is back voicing 
dual roles as the eccentric birds Ramon and 
Lovelace. Mumble takes off on a mission 
to rescue Erik, but upon their return (after a 
battle of wills with an ornery elephant seal) 
they face a more desperate rescue mission. 
The emperor penguins’ habitat has shifted, 
leaving the flock trapped in an icy chasm 
that allows no escape. Concurrently, we are 
made privy to the plight of Will (Pitt) and Bill 
(Damon), a couple of krill who decide they’re 
tired of being at the bottom of the food 
chain and set off on their own adventure 
away from the swarm. No longer will they be 
“one in a krillion.” 

Though thematically related, the penguin 
and krill stories never really intersect and 


wind up making the film feel rather choppy. 
Unfortunately, most of the film’s wit and humor 
is found in the existential crisis of the krill, 
while the penguin material coasts on the ani- 
mals’ cute, cuddly appearances. Nevertheless, 
the film’s near-constant peril may intimidate 
the young ones in the audience, who may also 
be at a stage where they prefer the comforts 
of conformity to the trials of individuation. To 
these viewers, “happy feet” only means wear- 
ing shoes that light up with every step. 

★★ - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lake Creek, Barton Creek Square, CM 
Cedar Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, 
Southpark Meadows, Cinemark Stone Hill Town 
Center, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, IMAX 
Theatre, Lakeline, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown 
South, Westgate 

HUGO 

D: Martin Scorsese; with Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, 
Asa Butterfield, Chloe Grace Moretz, Ray Winstone, Emily 
Mortimer, Christopher Lee. (PG) 

Not reviewed at press time. The latest 
from Martin Scorsese is an adaptation of 
the children’s book The Invention of Hugo 
Cabret, which is set in 1930s Paris. (Opens 
Wednesday.) - Marjorie Baumgarten 

IMMORTALS 

D: Tarsem Singh; with Henry Cavill, Mickey Rourke, John 
Hurt, Kellan Lutz, Freida Pinto, Luke Evans. (R, 110 min.) 

What Tarsem Singh’s first two films, 

2000’s The Cell and 2006’s The Fall, lacked 
in narrative articulateness he balanced out 
with visual verve. The two films couldn’t have 
been more different in terms of setting - one 
is about a contemporary serial killer; the 
other, a bedridden Hollywood stuntman in the 
1920s - but they shared a more elemental 
idea: that damaged psyches can create a 
fictional space that is part refuge, part terror- 
scape, and then invite others into that space 
for a mythic quest ornamented with strange 
beasts and primeval imagery. 

Which, I suppose, made Singh a no-brainer 
- at least on paper - to take on an actual 
Greek myth, or at least a cobbled-together 
one, in Immortals. But in putting Singh’s 
ancients-recalling aesthetic into something 
like its correct context, the thumpingness of 
his vision has turned rather tinny. 

Future Superman Henry Cavill plays 
Theseus, a blank-eyed, bastard-born villager 
who, unbeknownst to him, has been hand- 
picked by the Olympian gods (done up in 
Studio 54 gold lame) to lead a revolt against 
the bloodthirsty King Hyperion (Rourke). 

There’s more to the story (by co-screenwriters 
Charley and Vlas Parlapanides) - a magical 
bow, a sexy virgin oracle (Pinto), caged Titans, 
none of it terribly interesting - but plot points 
exist primarily to get the film from one grue- 
some act to the next. Barbarity, of course, was 
the Greek gods’ bread and butter, but there’s 
more to thrill at in three lines of Homer than 
the whole of Singh’s numbingly choreographed 
chaos and lascivious bloodletting. The Greek 
myths, of course, will endure. The same cannot 
be said for Singh’s silly, self-serious, instantly 
forgettable, and inaptly named Immortals. 

- Kimberley Jones 

Alamo Village, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar 
Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, 
Southpark Meadows, Cinemark Stone Hill Town 
Center, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, 
Lakeline, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South, 
Westgate 


BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN 


RECOMMENDED 


★★★★ 


Alamo Lamar, Violet Crown 


66 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 





FILM LISTINGS 


INTO THE ABYSS 

D: Werner Herzog. (PG-13, 106 min.) 

I’m not entirely sure what to make of 
Herzog’s documentary about a 1991 triple 
homicide in rural Texas and its resulting 
repercussions, up to and including the execu- 
tion of 28-year-old Michael Perry, one of two 
men (teenagers at the time) convicted in the 
homicides. Certainly, this is an indictment of 
capital punishment as an effective deterrent 
to crime, but it’s also just as much an indict- 
ment of small-town idiocy and the folly of mis- 
guided youth. Conroe, Texas, comes off look- 
ing like the 10th ring of hell - a place filled 
with random violence, Skoal tobacco chewers, 
and an overall sense of intellectual and spiri- 
tual depredation. But the same could be said 
of any part of small-town America these days, 
and big-city life isn’t necessarily better or less 
random in its treacheries. 

Herzog is after much more than the obvi- 
ous chain of events, however, a tack that will 
have zero surprise for those already familiar 
with the insatiably curious director’s modus 
operandi. Utilizing police crime-scene videos 
and interviews with the killers, the relatives of 
the slain, and even the death-house chaplain, 
Herzog indicts poor child-rearing skills, bad 
educational systems, and the basest instincts 
of human behavior all in one brutal go. 

Herzog is an eloquent interviewer/docu- 
mentarian. (I’d argue only Errol Morris is his 
equal.) Yet his technically flawless film leaves 
you reeling emotionally even as you wonder 
why, and why now, he’s turned his lens on 
the American way of crime and punishment. 
Granted, Herzog elicits some (presumably) 
true tales of Conroe life that are as colorful 
as the people who report them, chief among 
them that chaplain, who recounts a surreal 
golf-course encounter with a pair of lively 
squirrels and somehow ends up comparing 
state execution with the potential flattening 
of rodents. Herzog, ever the eccentric film- 
maker on a mission, may have met his match 
in this man of the cloth. 

★★V - Marc Savlov 

Arbor 

JACK AND JILL 

D: Dennis Dugan; with Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes, Al 
Pacino, Eugenio Derbez, Nick Swardson, Tim Meadows, 
Valerie Mahaffey. (PG, 91 min.) 

I’m not sure which is more freakish: the 
fact that this savagely unfun and relentlessly 
generic Adam Sandler comedy has spawned 
its own (infinitely more entertaining) Internet 
meme or the realization that something has 


gone seriously awry with the decision-making 
process of Al Pacino’s agent. Actually, Pacino, 
playing a sublime but hardly subtle variation 
on the theme of Pacino, is the best thing 
about Jack and Jill, which otherwise might as 
well be one of Eddie Murphy’s gender-bent, 
fat-suited, flatulent mawkathons. 

It’s probably worse than pointless to ask 
what has become of the Adam Sandler who 
once upon a time took a courageous chance 
on Punch-Drunk Love or was as consistently 
hilarious as he was in Happy Gilmore (the 
former S/VL-er’s last truly great comedy). 

Yes, Judd Apatow’s Funny People had brains, 
heart, and a winning turn from Sandler, but 
the comedian quickly fell below par again 
with last year’s snoozily predictable Grown 
Ups. The downhill slide is only made more 
comically perilous here, with Sandler (who co- 
wrote the cruddy screenplay with Click scribe 
Steve Koren) cast as Los Angeles ad execu- 
tive Jack Sadelstein as well as his needy, 
harpy-esque twin sister Jill, who has arrived 
from the Bronx to spend the Thanksgiving 
holiday with her brother’s family and then 
extends her stay way past the sibling break- 
ing point. (Holmes is utterly wasted as Jack’s 
wife Erin.) Two Adam Sandlers for the price 
of one? And Al Pacino?! It’s like a dream. A 
horrible, depressingly cookie-cutter dream 
conceived by a craven Hollywood exec who 
thinks no one will notice how similar in 
hysterical tone and lazy execution this is to 
too many previous Sandler outings (and, as 
noted earlier, Eddie Murphy bottom-of-the- 
barrel scrapers) to name. It’s front-loaded 
with enough cameos from the likes of Regis 
Philbin and Drew Carey to sink most crappy 
comedies, and, indeed, this one finally 
makes it to an actual pleasure cruise, minus 
the pleasure. 

On the other hand, however, Al Pacino 
could probably make a reading of the Bronx 
phone directory into absolutely killer stuff, 
and I’d probably rave about it. Smitten with 
Jill, he’s all goosey, gravelly, lovesick puppy 
- a strange turn from a literal living legend, 
but no stranger, perhaps, than the sizable 
amount of money the film took in over open- 
ing weekend. Is it just me, or do I sense trip- 
lets on the horizon? 

i -Marc Savlov 

Alamo Lake Creek, Barton Creek Square, CM 
Cedar Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, 
Southpark Meadows, Cinemark Stone Hill Town 
Center, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, 
Lakeline, Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South, 
Westgate 


openings 

Melancholia (R) 

Arthur Christmas (PG) 

The Descendants (R) 

Happy Feet Two (PG) 

Hugo (PG) 

Into the Abyss (PG-13) 

The Muppets (PG) 

Rockstar (NR) 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 
(PG-13) 


ratings 

★★★★★ as perfect as a movie can be 

★★★★ Slightly flawed, 

but excellent nonetheless 

★★★ Has its good points, 
and its bad points 

★★ Mediocre, but with one or two 
bright spots 

★ Poor, without any saving graces 
La bomba 


THE MUPPETS 

D: James Bobin; with Amy Adams, Jason Segel. (PG, 120 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. The world’s 
biggest Muppet fan joins with his friends 
to stage a telethon when he learns that 
the Muppet Theater is about to be razed 
for the oil underneath the land. The event 
also reunites the Muppets, who have gone 
their separate ways in the intervening years. 

(Opens Wednesday.) - Marjorie Baumgarten 
Barton Creek Square, Tinseltown North, Westgate 

ROCKSTAR 

D: Imtiaz Ali; with Ranbir Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor, Nargis 
Fakhri, Shikha Jain, Jaideep Ahlawat. (NR, 160 min., subtitled) 

Not reviewed at press time. A young man in 
Delhi dreams of becoming a rock idol but meets 
only ridicule in this Bollywood film. He decides 
his middle-class life has sequestered him from 
tragedy, which is the common thread in rock-star 
biographies, so he sets out to acquire some 
painful experiences. - Marjorie Baumgarten 
Tinseltown South 

PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES 



HOLIDAY CLASSICS 


2-F0R-1 TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS 
STUDENT DISCOUNT THURSDAYS 
EVERY 11TH RENTAL FREE 






CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 67 









FRIDAY, NOV. 18-THURSDAY, NOV. 24 

An asterisk (*) before a title means that no passes or special admission discounts will be accepted. 

FOR UPDATED SHOWTIMES, SEE austinchromcle.com/film. 

Changes may sometimes occur; viewers are encouraged to call theatres to confirm showtimes. 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE AT THE RITZ 320 E. Sixth, 
476-1320. Showtimes at this venue are subject to frequent 
change. Please confirm daily by phone or website. 

Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Late Show: The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th 
Dimension: Fri-Sat, 11:30pm; Sun, 10:00pm 
Balls Out: Sun, 7:00pm 
Weird Wednesday: Blood Freak: Wed, 9:45pm 
Master Pancake: Hanksgiving Celebration: Fri-Sat, 7:00, 10:00 
Music Monday: I Want My MTV: Mon, 10:05pm 
Terror Tuesday: Infra-Man: Tue, 10:00pm 
Music Monday: Kill All Redneck Pricks: KARP Lives! 1990-1998: 
Mon, 7:00pm 

*The Rum Diary: Fri, 5:35, 8:30; Sat, 2:40, 3:50, 5:35, 8:35; 

Sun, 1:00, 3:00, 3:55, 6:00, 9:00; Mon, 7:10, 9:40;Tue, 7:00pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE LAKE CREEK 13729 Research, 
219-5408. Showtimes at this venue are subject to frequent 
change. Please confirm daily by phone or website. Call 
theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

* Happy Feet Two: Fri-Sat, 10:15am, 12:00, 1:05,4:00, 10:00pm; 
Sun, 9:55am, 11:00, 12:40,3:30pm; Mon, 11:15am, 1:50,4:25, 
11:00pm; Tue, 11:25am, 2:10, 4:55, 11:00pm 
*Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Sat, 7:00pm; Sun, 6:10pm; Mon-Tue, 7:00pm 
*J. Edgpr: Fri-Sun, 1:00, 4:15, 7:30, 10:45; Mon-Tue, 12:30, 3:45, 
7:05,10:10 

*Jack and Jill: Fri, 10:10am, 12:30, 6:30pm; Sat, 6:30,9:00; 

Sun, 10: 10am, 12:30, 6:30pm; Mon-Tue, 1 1:45am, 2:20, 7:30, 10:00pm 
*Puss in Boots: Fri-Sat, 10:25am, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00pm; Sun, 10:25am, 
2:00, 4:25pm; Mon, 12:15, 5:20;Tue, 12:15, 5:20, 7:30 
*Tower Heist: Fri-Sun, 10:20am, 12:50,3:25,6:00, 11:30pm; 

Mon, 11:00am, 2:40, 4:50, 7:45, 10:20pm;Tue, 11:00am, 2:40, 
4:50,7:45,9:35pm 

*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 9:30am, 
10:00, 12:45, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 7:15, 8:00, 8:45, 10:30, 
11:15pm; Sun, 10:00am, 12:45, 1:15,3:00,4:00,4:30, 7:15, 
8:00,8:45, 10:30, 11:15pm; Mon, 11:15am, 12:35, 1:35,3:05, 
3:50,4:45, 7:00, 7:15,8:00, 10:15, 10:25pm;Tue, 11:35am, 
12:35, 1:35, 3:15, 3:50, 4:45, 7:15, 8:00, 10:15, 10:25pm 
Food & Film: The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 Feast: 
Mon-Tue, 7:00pm 

*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:30pm; 
Sun, 9:45pm; Mon, 9:40pm;Tue, 10:00pm 
TV @ the Alamo: The Walking Dead: Sun, 9:00pm 
Action Pack: Ye-Z in Love Sing-Along: Sun, 7:00pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE LAMAR 1120 S. Lamar, 
707-8262. Showtimes subject to frequent change. 

Please confirm daily by phone or website. Call theatre 
for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

AFS: The Awful Truth: Tue, 7:00pm 

Action Pack: The Big Lebowski Quote-Along: Mon, 10:00pm 

*The Descendants: Wed-Thu (11/24), 11:00am, 1:45,4:30, 

7:35, 10:35pm 

Martha Marcy May Marlene: Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 1:45, 6:15, 8:50pm; 
Sun, 10:50am, 1:20, 6:50, 9:25pm; Mon, 1:00, 5:10, 10:50; 

Tue, 11:10am, 1:45, 9:00pm 

*Melancholia: Fri-Sat, 11:00am, 1:15,4:15, 7:30, 10:40pm; 

Sun, 10:55am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:10, 10:20pm; Mon, 1:15, 4:15, 7:05, 
1 1:00; Tue, 11:00am, 12:50, 3:50, 7:55, 10:15pm 
The Skin I Live In: Fri-Sat, 10:55am, 4:15, 7:50, 10:50pm; 

Sun, 10:40am, 3:50, 7:50, 10:45pm; Mon, 3:55, 8:00, 10:10; 

Tue, 10:55am, 4:15, 7:35, 10:35pm 

Take Shelter: Fri-Sat, 2:00, 4:50; Sun, 1:55, 4:50; Mon, 2:00pm; 
Tue, 2:00, 4:50 

*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 11:00am, 
12:00, 2:05, 3:20, 5:15, 6:45, 8:25, 9:55, 10:25, 11:35pm; 

Sun, 11:00am, 1:25, 2:05, 4:35, 5:15, 7:45, 8:25, 10:55, 
11:35pm; Mon, 1:00, 1:35,3:30,4:40,6:45,7:50,9:00, 10:25; 
Tue, 11:30am, 12:10, 2:40, 3:25, 6:40, 7:00, 9:30, 9:55, 10:55pm 
Food & Film: The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 Feast: 

Tue, 7:00pm 

*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri, 11:10am, 1:30, 
3:50, 11:25pm; Sat, 1:30, 3:50, 11:25; Sun, 10:50am, 1:10, 

3:30, 11:45pm; Mon, 1:25, 4:05, 6:30; Tue, 1:40, 4:00, 6:30 

TV @ the Alamo: The Walking Dead: Sun, 9:10pm 


ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE VILLAGE 2700 W. Anderson, 
459-7090. Tuesday matinee Baby Day shows (first show of 
the day) are intended for parents and their children younger 
than 6. Showtimes at this venue are subject to frequent 
change. Please confirm daily times by phone or website. 

Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

*lmmortals: Fri, 11:25am, 2:10pm; Sat, 11:50am, 4:30pm; 

Sun, 11:10am, 1:55pm; Mon, 4:30pm; Tue, 10:40am 
immortals (3-D): Fri, 8:00, 10:55; Sat, 6:10, 9:00; Sun-Mon, 8:00, 
10:50; Tue, 6:45,9:45 

*J. Edgar: Fri, 1:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:50; Sat, 1:20, 7:30, 10:45; 

Sun, 12:35,4:05, 7:30, 10:40; Mon, 7:30, 10:45; Tue, 11:50am, 
3:20,7:40,9:40pm 

*Puss in Boots: Fri, 11:00am, 6:30pm; Sat, 10:55am, 6:50pm; 

Sun, 10:55am, 6:30pm; Mon, 6:30pm; Tue, 11:35am, 7:15pm 
*Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri, 1:25, 3:55; Sat, 1:55, 4:20; Sun, 1:25, 
3:55; Mon, 3:55pm; Tue, 2:10, 4:40 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Sat, 1 1:55pm 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri, 10:00am, 12:00, 
3:30, 4:20, 7:00, 9:05, 10:25pm; Sat, 10:45am, 12:15, 2:50, 
3:35, 7:00, 9:30, 10:25pm; Sun, 12:10, 3:35, 4:45, 7:00, 9:00, 
10:15; Mon, 3:35, 4:40, 7:00,9:10, 10:15; Tue, 11:30am, 1:25, 
2:55,4:35,6:30,9:50,10:50pm 


ARBOR CINEMA @ GREAT HILLS 9828 Great Hills Trail 
(atJollyville), 231-9742. Discounts daily before 6pm. Call 
theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Anonymous: Fri-Mon, 12:30, 3:30, 6:40, 9:50; Tue, 12:30, 3:30 
Into the Abyss: Fri-Tue, 12:10,3:10, 7:10, 10:05 
J. Edgar: Fri-Tue, 12:40,3:50, 7:00, 10:10 
Like Crazy: Fri-Tue, 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:50, 10:25 
Martha Marcy May Marlene: Fri-Tue, 12:20, 3:20, 6:50, 9:55 
Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 
The Skin I Live In: Fri-Tue, 1:10, 4:10, 7:40, 10:30 
NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Tue, 6:30pm 
Take Shelter: Fri, 12:50, 3:40, 7:30, 10:20; Sat, 7:30, 10:20; 
Sun-Tue, 12:50,3:40,7:30,10:20 
The Way: Fri-Tue, 1:00, 4:00, 7:20, 10:15 


BARTON CREEK SQUARE (AMC) Barton Creek Square 
mall, MoPac & Highway 360, 888/AMC-4FUN. Matinee 
discounts available before 6pm on weekdays and before 
4pm Friday through Sunday and holidays. Call theatre for 
Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

* Anonymous: Fri-Tue, 2:10pm 

*Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Sat, 1:45, 6:50, 11:55; Sun-Tue, 1:45, 6:50 

* Happy FeetTwo (3-D, IMAX): Fri-Sun, 9:35am, 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 
8:00, 10:30pm; Mon-Tue, 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 8:00, 10:30; 

Wed-Thu (11/24), 9:35am, 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 8:00, 10:30pm 


* Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:00am, 4:20, 9:25pm; 
Wed-Thu (11/24), 11:10am, 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25pm 

immortals (3-D): Fri-Sat, 9:40am, 12:10, 1:50, 3:00, 5:40, 7:35, 
8:20, 11:00, 12:45am; Sun, 9:40am, 12:10, 1:50,3:00, 5:40, 
7:35, 8:20, 11:00pm; Mon, 12:10, 1:50, 3:00, 5:40, 7:35, 8:20, 
11:00; Tue, 12:30, 1:50, 3:00, 5:40, 7:35, 8:20 
*lmmortals (digital): Fri-Sat, 11:10am, 4:40, 10:15pm; Sun, 4:40, 
10:15; Mon-Tue, 11:10am, 4:40, 10:15pm 
*ln Time: Fri-Sat, 11:25am, 1:55,4:35, 7:30, 10:10pm, 12:40am; 
Sun-Tue, 11:25am, 1:55,4:35, 7:30, 10:10pm 
*J. Edgar: Fri-Sun, 9:55am, 1:10,4:10, 7:20, 10:20pm; 

Mon-Tue, 1:10,4:10,7:20,10:20 

* Jack and Jill: Fri-Sat, 9:50am, 12:00, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40pm, 
12:20am; Sun, 9:50am, 12:00, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40pm; 

Mon-Tue, 12:00,5:10,7:25,9:40 

*Jack and Jill (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 1:15,3:25,5:40, 

8:10, 10:35pm, 12:45am; Sun, 3:25, 5:40, 8:10, 10:35; 

Mon-Tue, 10:45am, 1:15, 3:25, 5:40, 8:10, 10:35pm 
*The Muppets (closed captioned, closed captioned and descrip- 
tive video): Wed-Thu (11/24), 11:20am, 2:05, 4:45, 7:30, 
10:15pm 

*Puss in Boots (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:25am, 12:35, 2:50, 5:10, 

7:25, 9:40pm; Sun, 10:25am, 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40pm; 
Mon, 10:30am, 12:35, 2:50, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40pm; Tue, 10:00am, 
10:30, 12:35, 2:50, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40pm 
*Tower Heist: Fri-Sat, 11:45am, 2:20, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10pm, 
12:35am; Sun-Tue, 11:45am, 2:20, 5:10, 7:35, 10:10pm 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 10:10am, 
11:15, 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 4:55, 7:05, 7:50, 9:55, 10:45pm, 
12:45am; Sun, 10:10am, 11:15, 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 4:55, 7:05, 
7:50, 9:55, 10:45pm; Mon-Tue, 10:20am, 11:15, 1:05, 2:00, 
4:00, 4:55, 7:05, 7:50, 9:55, 10:45pm 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri-Sat, 9:35am, 12:20, 3:10, 5:55, 8:40, 11:30pm, 12mid; 

Sun, 9:35am, 12:20,3:10,5:55,8:40, 11:30pm; Mon-Tue, 12:20, 
3:10, 5:55, 8:40; Wed, 9:40am, 10:00, 12:20, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 
5:45, 7:05,8:30, 10:00, ll:10pm;Thu (11/24), 9:40am, 10:00, 
12:20, 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00pm 
*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Sat, 1 1:05am, 
1:25, 3:45, 6:10, 8:30, 11:00pm; Sun, 3:45, 6:10, 8:30, 11:00; 
Mon-Tue, 11:05am, 1:25, 3:45, 6:10, 8:30, 11:00pm 


CINEMARK CEDAR PARK 1335 E. Whitestone, 
800/FANDANGO. Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 
Footloose (digital): Fri-Sun, 4:10, 9:30; Mon-Tue, 10:20am, 
4:10,9:30pm 

Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:50am, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:20pm 
Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri-Sun, 9:50am, 10:30, 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 
9:10pm; Mon-Tue, 10:30am, 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10pm 
Immortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:15 
Immortals (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:10am 
In Time (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:30, 6:50 
J. Edgar (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:40am, 3:10, 6:20, 9:40pm 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri, 10:40am, 12:10, 1:20,2:40,3:40,5:00, 
6:10, 7:20, 8:30, 10:50pm; Sat, 10:40am, 1:20, 3:40, 5:00, 6:10, 
7:20, 8:30, 9:50, 10:50pm; Sun, 10:40am, 1:20, 3:40, 6:10, 
7:20,8:30,9:50, 10:50pm; Mon, 10:40am, 12:10, 1:20,2:40, 
3:40, 5:00, 6:10, 7:20, 8:30, 10:50pm; Tue, 10:40am, 12:10, 
1:20, 2:40, 3:40, 6:10, 8:30, 10:50pm 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:10am, 12:30, 2:50, 5:20, 

7:40, 10:10pm 

Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 

NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Sun, 1:30pm; Tue, 6:30pm 
Tower Heist (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:10am, 12:50, 3:30, 6:40, 9:20pm 
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri-Tue, 10:00am, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00,2:00,3:00,4:00,5:00, 
6:10, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:00pm 
A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri, 9:50pm; Mon, 9:50pm 


CINEMARK HILL COUNTRY GALLERIA 14 

12812 Hill Country Blvd., 800/FANDANGO. Call theatre for 
Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:30am, 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10pm 
Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:00 
Immortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:05am, 1:55, 4:45, 7:30, 10:20pm 
Immortals (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:35,3:25, 6:15,9:10 
In Time (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:40, 7:00 
J. Edgar (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10:00 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri, 11:10am, 12:25, 1:45,3:00,4:20,5:35, 
6:50, 8:10, 9:30, 10:30pm; Sat-Sun, 12:25, 3:00, 5:35, 6:50, 
8:10,9:30, 10:30; Mon, 11:10am, 12:25, 1:45,3:00,4:20,5:35, 
6:50,8:10,9:30, 10:30pm;Tue, 11:10am, 12:25, 1:45,3:00, 
4:20,6:50,9:30,10:30pm 
Moneyball (digital): Fri-Tue, 3:45, 9:45 
Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:15am, 1:40, 4:15, 6:55, 9:25pm 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri-Tue, 12:30, 3:05, 5:30, 7:55, 10:25 
Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 

NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Sun, 1:30pm; Tue, 6:30pm 
TowerHeist (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:20am, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20pm 
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00,2:05,3:10,4:05,5:10, 
6:10, 7:10,8:15, 9:15, 10:15pm; Sun-Tue, 11:00am, 12:00, 1:00, 
2:05, 3:10, 4:05, 5:10, 6:10, 7:10, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15pm 


CINEMARK MOVIES 8 ROUND ROCK 2120 N. Mays, 
Round Rock, 512/388-2848. Discounts daily before 5pm. 
Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Abduction: Fri, 1:30,4:00, 7:20,9:50, 11:55; Sat, 11:05am, 1:30, 
4:00, 7:20, 9:50, 11:55pm; Sun, 11:05am, 1:30, 4:00, 7:20, 
9:50pm; Mon-Tue, 1:30, 4:00, 7:20, 9:50 
Contagion: Fri, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 11:55; Sat, 11:40am, 2:15, 

4:45, 7:30, 11:55pm; Sun, 11:40am, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30pm; 
Mon-Tue, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30 

The Help: Fri, 3:30, 6:45, 9:55; Sat-Tue, 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 9:55 
Johnny English Reborn: Fri, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10,9:40, 11:55; 

Sat, 11:30am, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10,9:40, 11:55pm; Sun, 11:30am, 
2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40pm; Mon-Tue, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40 
Killer Elite: Fri-Tue, 10:10pm 

The Lion King 3D (3-D): Fri, 5:00, 10:15; Sat-Sun, 11:50am, 5:00, 
10:15pm; Mon-Tue, 5:00, 10:15 

The Smurfs: Fri, 1:20, 3:45, 6:30; Sat-Sun, 11:00am, 1:20, 3:45, 
6:30pm; Mon-Tue, 1:20, 3:45, 6:30 
The Smurfs (3-D): Fri, 5:15, 10:00; Sat-Tue, 12:00, 5:15, 10:00 

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (3-D): Fri-Tue, 2:45, 7:45 
Warrior: Fri-Tue, 9:00pm 

What’s Your Number?: Fri, 1:45,4:15, 7:00,9:30, 11:50; 

Sat, 11:15am, 1:45,4:15, 7:00,9:30, 11:50pm; Sun, 11:15am, 
1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30pm; Mon-Tue, 1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30 


CINEMARK ROUND ROCK 4401 N. 1-35, Round Rock, 
800/FANDANGO. Cost for 3-D shows is regular ticket price 
plus a $3.50 premium. Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 
Courageous (digital): Fri, 4:10,9:40; Sat-Sun, 10:10am, 4:10, 
9:40pm; Mon-Tue, 4:10, 9:40 
Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri, 1:55,4:40, 7:15,9:50; 

Sat-Sun, 11:20am, 1:55, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50pm; Mon-Tue, 1:55, 
4:40, 7:15, 9:50; Wed-Thu (11/24), 11:20am, 1:55,4:40, 
7:15,9:50pm 


Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri, 1:10,3:35, 6:05, 8:30, 10:55; 
Sat-Sun, 10:45am, 1:10, 3:35, 6:05, 8:30, 10:55pm; 

Mon-Tue, 1:10, 3:35, 6:05, 8:30, 10:55; Wed-Thu 
(11/24), 10:45am, 1:10, 3:35, 6:05, 8:30, 10:55pm 
Immortals (3-D): Fri, 1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25; Sat-Sun, 10:40am, 
1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25pm; Mon-Tue, 1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 
Immortals (digital): Fri, 2:05, 4:50, 7:45, 10:25; 

Sat-Sun, 11:10am, 2:05, 4:50, 7:45, 10:25pm; Mon-Tue, 2:05, 
4:50, 7:45, 10:25 
In Time (digital): Fri-Tue, 1:20, 7:05 

J. Edgar (digital): Fri, 1:15, 4:25, 7:35, 10:40; Sat-Sun, 10:05am, 
1:15, 4:25, 7:35, 10:40pm; Mon-Tue, 1:15, 4:25, 7:35, 10:40 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri, 1:35, 3:55, 4:35, 7:10, 9:30, 10:05; 
Sat-Sun, 10:50am, 11:30, 1:35,3:55,4:35, 7:10,9:30, 10:05pm; 
Mon-Tue, 1:35, 3:55, 4:35, 7:10, 9:30, 10:05 
Paranormal Activity 3 { digital): Fri-Tue, 1:50, 6:55 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri, 1:40, 4:20, 6:35, 8:50; 

Sat-Sun, 11:25am, 1:40, 4:20, 6:35, 8:50pm; Mon-Tue, 1:40, 
4:20,6:35,8:50 

Tower Heist (digital): Fri, 2:10, 4:45, 7:40, 10:15; 

Sat-Sun, 11:15am, 2:10, 4:45, 7:40, 10:15pm; Mon-Tue, 2:10, 
4:45, 7:40,10:15 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): Fri, 1:00, 1:30, 
2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 
10:30, 11:00; Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 10:30, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 

1:30, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 
10:00, 10:30, 11:00pm; Mon-Tue, 1:00, 1:30,2:00,3:00,4:00, 
4:30, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00; 
Wed-Thu (11/24), 10:00am, 10:30, 11:00, 12:00, 1:00, 1:30,2:00, 
3:00, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 6:00, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 10:30pm 


CINEMARK SOUTHPARK MEADOWS 9900 S. 1-35, 
800/FANDANGO. Cost for 3-D shows is regular ticket price plus 
a $3.50 premium. Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 
Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Sun, 11:40am, 2:25, 5:15, 7:45, 
10:10pm; Mon-Tue, 2:25, 5:15, 7:45, 10:10 
Happy Feet Two (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:25am, 1:00,3:40, 6:15, 
8:45pm; Mon-Tue, 1:00, 3:40, 6:15, 8:45; Wed, 10:25am, 1:00, 
3:40, 6:15,8:45pm 
Immortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 6:50, 9:35 

Immortals (digital): Fri-Sun, 11:20am, 2:10, 5:00, 7:40, 10:20pm; 

Mon-Tue, 2:10, 5:00, 7:40, 10:20 
J. Edgar (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:05am, 1:10,4:15, 7:15, 10:15pm; 

Mon-Tue, 1:10,4:15, 7:15,10:15 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri-Sun, 11:00am, 12:30, 1:45,3:15,4:30, 
5:45, 7:15, 8:30, 9:45pm; Mon, 12:30, 1:45, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 
7:15, 8:30, 9:45; Tue, 12:30, 1:45, 3:15, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45 
Puss in Boots ( 3-D): Fri-Sun, 11:25am, 1:55,4:30pm; 

Mon-Tue, 1:55,4:30 

Puss in Boots (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:10am, 12:40,3:10,5:45, 
8:15pm; Mon-Tue, 12:40, 3:10, 5:45, 8:15 

Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 

NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Sun, 1:30pm; Tue, 6:30pm 
Tower Heist (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:30am, 1:10,3:50,6:30,9:10pm; 
Mon-Tue, 1:10,3:50,6:30,9:10 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): Fri-Sun, 10:15am, 
1 1:00, 11:45, 12:30, 1:15, 2:00, 2:45, 3:30, 4:15, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 
7:15,8:00,8:45,9:30, 10:15, 11:00pm; Mon-Tue, 12:30, 1:15,2:00, 
2:45, 3:30, 4:15, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 7:15, 8:00, 8:45, 9:30, 10:15, 
11:00; Wed, 10:15am, 1:15,4:15,7:15, 10:15pm 
A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri, 10:20am, 12:50, 
3:20, 6:45, 9:20pm; Sat-Sun, 6:45, 9:20; Mon-Tue, 12:50, 3:20, 
6:45,9:20 


CINEMARK STONE HILL TOWN CENTER 18820 
Hilltop Commercial Dr. (southwest corner of highways 130 & 
45), 512/251-0938. Call theatre for Nov. 21-24 showtimes. 
Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri, 12:20,3:15, 6:10, 8:50; Sat, 9:45am, 
12:20, 3:15, 6:10, 8:50pm; Sun, 9:45am, 12:20, 3:15, 6:10pm 
Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri, 11:00am, 1:50,4:40, 7:30, 10:10pm; 

Sat-Sun, 9:30am, 10:20, 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10pm 
Immortals (3-D): Fri, 2:20, 7:20, 10:00; Sat, 7:20, 10:00; 

Sun, 7:20, 9:50 

Immortals (digital): Fri-Sat, 11:50am, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, 
11:20pm; Sun, 11:50am, 2:30, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10pm 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri-Sun, 11:50am, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:00pm 
Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri, 12:00, 5:00; Sat-Sun, 5:00pm 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri, 12:30, 3:20, 6:20, 8:40; 

Sat-Sun, 10:00am, 12:30, 3:20, 6:20, 8:40pm 
Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 

NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Sun, 1:30pm; Tue, 6:30pm 
TowerHeist (digital): Fri-Sun, 12:50, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): Fri, 11:10am, 
12:40,2:15,3:50,5:20,7:00,8:30, 10:20,11:00, 11:20pm; 

Sat, 9:30am, 11:10, 12:40, 2:15, 3:50, 5:20, 7:00, 8:30, 10:20, 
11:00, 11:20pm; Sun, 9:30am, 11:10, 12:40, 2:15, 3:50, 5:20, 
7:00, 8:30, 9:50pm; Mon-Tue, 12:40, 3:50, 7:00, 9:50; 

Wed-Thu (11/24), 9:50am, 12:40,3:50, 7:00, 10:10pm 
A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Sat, 1 1:20pm; 

Sun, 9:00pm 


FLIX BREWHOUSE 2200 S. 1-35, 512/244-FUX. Round Rock 

* Happy FeetTwo (3-D): 10:35am, 1:10,3:45,6:30,9:15pm 

* Immortals (3-D): 11:25am, 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:35pm 
*J. Edgar (digital): 12:50, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25 

*Jack and Jill (digital): 10:15am, 12:00,2:30, 10:15pm 
*Puss in Boots (digital): 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 9:45 
*Tower Heist (digital): 2:45, 5:30, 8:00, 10:45 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri, 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00pm, 12mid; 

Sat-Thu (11/24), 10:00am, 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00pm 


GALAXY HIGHLAND 10 North 1-35 & Middle Fiskville, 
467-7305. No one under 18 will be allowed in the theatre 
on Friday or Saturday after 7pm without an adult. 

*Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 11:30, 12:15,2:10,2:30, 
4:20,4:40, 6:40, 7:05,9:20, 11:50pm; Sun-Thu (11/24), 10:00am, 
11:30, 12:15, 2:10, 2:30, 4:20, 4:40, 6:40, 7:05, 9:20pm 
*lmmortals (3-D): Fri-Sat, 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45pm, 12mid; 
Sun-Thu (11/24), 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 
immortals (3-D, D-Box): Fri-Sat, 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45pm, 
12mid; Sun-Thu (11/24), 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 
*J. Edgar (digital): 10:10am, 1:00, 4:10, 7:15, 10:10pm 
*Jack and Jill (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:20am, 12:30,2:40,4:50, 7:10, 
9:20, 11:30pm; Sun-Thu (11/24), 10:20am, 12:30,2:40,4:50, 
7:10,9:20pm 

*Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:05am, 12:00, 2:15, 4:30, 6:55, 9:15, 
11:20pm; Sun-Thu (11/24), 10:05am, 12:00,2:15,4:30,6:55,9:15pm 
*Tower Heist (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:15am, 12:25,2:45, 5:05, 7:25, 
9:45, 11:55pm; Sun-Thu (11/24), 10:15am, 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 
7:25,9:45pm 

*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 10:30, 11:00, 12:30, 1:00, 1:45,3:45,4:00, 
4:30, 6:45, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30, 10:00, 10:15, 11:55pm; Sun-Thu 
(11/24), 10:00am, 10:30, 11:00, 12:30, 1:00, 1:45,3:45,4:00, 
4:30, 6:45, 7:00, 7:30, 9:30, 10:00, 10:15pm 

*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Sat, 9:35, 1 1:30; 
Sun-Thu (11/24), 9:35pm 


GATEWAY THEATRE 9700 Stonelake, 416-5700x3808. 
Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. Call theatre for Nov. 
23-24 showtimes. 

* Happy FeetTwo: Fri-Tue, 11:45am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:50, 9:30pm 

* Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:15am, 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:45, 
10:05pm; Sun-Tue, 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:45, 10:05 

immortals: Fri-Tue, 12:20, 5:20, 10:35 
*lmmortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:40am, 2:10, 2:45, 4:35, 7:35, 
8:10,10:10pm 

In Time: Fri-Tue, 12:10,2:40,5:10, 7:50, 10:25 
Jack and Jill: Fri, 10:35am, 12:45, 2:35, 3:05, 4:55, 5:30, 7:50, 
9:40, 10:25pm; Sat, 10:35am, 12:15, 12:45, 3:05, 4:55, 5:30, 
7:20, 7:50, 10:25pm; Sun, 12:45, 2:35, 3:05, 4:55, 5:30, 7:20, 
7:50, 10:25; Mon, 12:45, 2:35, 3:05, 4:55, 5:30, 7:50, 9:40, 
10:25;Tue, 12:15, 12:45, 3:05, 4:55, 5:30, 7:20, 7:50, 10:25; 
Wed, 2:35, 4:55, 9:40; Thu (11/24), 12:15,4:55, 7:20 
Jack and Jill (open captioned): Fri, 12:15, 7:20; Sat, 2:35, 9:40; 
Sun, 12:15, 9:40; Mon, 12:15, 7:20;Tue, 2:35, 9:40; Wed, 12:15, 
7:20; Thu (11/24), 2:35, 9:40 
Paranormal Activity 3: Fri-Tue, 9:45pm 
*Puss in Boots: Fri-Tue, 12:20, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 
*Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:35am, 11:50, 12:50, 1:55, 3:00, 
4:20, 5:20, 7:40, 10:15pm; Sun-Tue, 11:50am, 12:50, 1:55, 3:00, 
4:20,5:20,7:40, 10:15pm 
*Tower Heist: Fri-Tue, 12:05, 2:25, 4:45, 7:25, 10:00 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 
11:00, 11:30, 1:20, 1:50,2:20,4:10,4:40,5:10,6:30, 7:00, 
7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50pm; Sun, 11:00am, 11:30, 
1:20, 1:50, 2:20, 4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 
9:50, 10:20, 10:50pm; Mon-Tue, 11:30am, 1:20, 1:50,2:20, 

4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 
10:50pm; Wed-Thu (11/24), 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50 
*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Sat, 10:40am, 
12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:25, 9:35pm; Sun-Tue, 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 
7:25,9:35 


IMAX THEATRE Texas State History Museum, 1800 N. 
Congress, 936-IMAX. Closed Thursday, Nov. 24. 

BornTo Be Wild: Fri-Sat, 11:00am; Mon-Wed, 11:00am 
Happy FeetTwo: Fri-Wed, 1:00,3:00, 5:00, 7:00,9:00 
Texas: The Big Picture: Fri-Sat, 10:00am; Mon-Wed, 10:00am 
Tornado Alley (3-D): Sat, 12:00pm; Mon-Wed, 12:00pm 


IPIC THEATERS AUSTIN 3225 Amy Donovan Plaza 
(at the Domain, formerly Gold Class Cinema), 568-3400. 

Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Immortals (3-D, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:15am, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, 
12:20am; Sun-Tue, 11:50am, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50pm 
J. Edgar (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30pm; 

Sun-Tue, 11:15am, 12:00,3:00,6:00,9:00pm 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri-Sat, 11:15am, 2:15, 4:30, 7:15,9:30pm; 
Sun-Tue, 2:15, 4:30, 7:15,9:30 

Moneyball (digital): Fri, 12:00, 6:45, 9:45; Sat-Tue, 12:00, 3:45, 
6:45, 9:45 

Puss in Boots (3-D, digital): Fri-Sat, 10:45am, 1:10, 3:30, 6:00, 
8:15pm; Sun, 10:45am, 4:50, 7:20, 9:30pm; Mon-Tue, 1:10, 3:30, 
6:05,8:15 

TowerHeist (digital): Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 1:30,4:15,6:45,9:15, 
11:45pm; Sun, 1:30,4:15, 6:45,9:15; Mon-Tue, 10:30am, 1:30, 
4:15,6:45,9:15pm 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): Fri, 10:00am, 
11:00, 1:00,2:00,4:00,5:00, 7:00,8:00, 10:00, 11:00pm, 
12mid, 12:15am; Sat, 10:00am, 11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 
7:00, 8:00, 10:00, 11:00pm, 12mid; Sun, 10:00am, 10:30, 

11:00, 1:00,2:00,4:00,5:00, 7:00,8:00, 10:00, 11:00pm; 
Mon-Tue, 10:00am, 10:30, 11:00, 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 
8:00,10:00,10:30,11:00pm 


LAKELINE Lakeline Mall at Highway 183 &RR 620, 
335-4793. Discounts daily before 6pm. Call theatre for Nov. 
18 and Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Dolphin Tale: Sat-Tue, 1:00, 3:45 

* Happy FeetTwo: Sat-Tue, 12:20, 5:10, 10:00 

* Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Sat-Tue, 2:45, 7:10, 7:35, 9:35 
immortals (3-D): Sat-Tue, 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55 
Jack and Jill: Sat-Tue, 12:05, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:45 
Paranormal Activity 3: Sat-Tue, 12:10,5:20, 10:10 
*Puss in Boots: Sat-Tue, 12:55, 3:05, 5:15, 7:25, 9:40 
*Real Steel: Sat-Tue, 2:30, 7:20 

*Tower Heist: Sat-Tue, 12:00, 2:35, 5:00, 7:40, 10:05 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri, 10:30am, 1:20, 
4:10, 7:00, 9:50pm; Sat, 10:30am, 12:45, 1:20, 3:40, 4:10, 7:00, 
7:30, 9:50, 10:20pm; Sun-Tue, 12:45, 1:20, 3:40, 4:10, 7:00, 
7:30,9:50,10:20 


METROPOLITAN South 1-35 & Stassney, 447-0101. 
Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. Call theatre for Nov. 
23-24 showtimes. 

50/50: Fri, 11:40am, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:35pm; Sat-Sun, 2:10, 
4:55, 7:40, 10:35; Mon, 11:40am, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:35pm; 
Tue, 11:40am, 2:10, 10:35pm 

Footloose: Fri, 10:45am, 1:30,4:20, 7:35, 10:25pm; Sat-Tue, 1:30, 
4:20,7:35,10:25 

The Ides of March: Fri-Sat, 11:15am, 2:00,4:30, 7:10, 10:10pm; 
Sun-Tue, 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 10:10 
J. Edgar: Fri-Tue, 12:00, 3:10, 6:50, 10:00 
*Real Steel: Fri-Sat, 10:05am, 1:00,4:00, 7:15, 10:30pm; 

Sun-Tue, 1:00, 4:00, 7:15, 10:30 
The Rum Diary: Fri-Sat, 10:10am, 1:10,4:05, 7:05, 10:05pm; 
Sun-Tue, 1:10, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05 
Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 
NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Tue, 6:30pm 
TheThing: Fri, 11:15am, 2:00, 4:30, 7:45, 10:30pm; Sat, 5:00, 
7:45, 10:30; Sun-Mon, 2:00, 4:30, 7:45, 10:30; Tue, 2:00, 10:30 
*Tower Heist: Fri-Sat, 10:15am, 11:40, 1:10,2:10,4:25,4:55, 
7:10,7:40,9:40, 10:35pm; Sun, 11:40am, 1:10,2:10,4:25, 
4:55, 7:10, 7:40, 9:40, 10:35pm; Mon, 11:40am, 1:10,2:10, 
4:25, 7:10, 9:40, 10:35pm;Tue, 11:40am, 1:10, 2:10, 4:25, 4:55, 
7:10,7:40,9:40, 10:35pm 

*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 10:00am, 
10:30, 11:00, 11:30, 12:50, 1:20, 1:50,2:20,3:40,4:10,4:40, 
5:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50pm; 
Sun-Tue, 11:30am, 12:50, 1:20, 1:50,2:20,3:40,4:10,4:40, 
5:10, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50pm 
*A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Tue, 11:45am, 
2:05,4:50, 7:20,10:05pm 


MILLENNIUM THEATRE 1156 Hargrave, 472-6932. 
Located within the Millennium Youth Entertainment Complex. 
Adults, $6; children, $4. 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 1 1:00am, 1:30, 
4:00, 6:30, 9:00pm; Wed, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30 


PARAMOUNT THEATRE 713 Congress, 472-5470. 

AMIA: Amateur Night: Home Movies From American Archives: 

Sat, 1:00pm 

AMIA: Nothing Sacred: Sat, 8:00pm 

AMIA: Passages From James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake: 

Sat, 10:45am 

AMIA: IVe Can’t Go Home Again: Sat, 9:00am 
Word Is Out: Sat, 3:00pm 


TEXAS SPIRIT THEATER AT THE BOB BULLOCK 
TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 

1800 N. Congress, 936-8746. 

Austin Music Film Festival: Les Blank Retrospective: Part 1: 

Fri, 6:00pm 

Austin Music Film Festival: Les Blank Retrospective: Part 2: 

Sun, 6:00pm 


TINSELTOWN NORTH North 1-35 & FM 1825, 512/989- 
8540. Cost for 3-D and XD shows is regular ticket price plus 
a premium. Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Arthur Christmas (3-D): Tue, 12mid 
Arthur Christmas (digital): Tue, 12mid 
Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:50am, 11:35,2:20, 4:10, 5:00, 
7:40,9:30,10:20pm 

Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri-Tue, 9:45am, 12:25, 1:30, 3:05, 5:45, 
6:50, 8:25pm 

Immortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 9:50am, 11:45, 12:40,2:20,3:30,5:20, 
6:20,8:10,9:10pm 

Immortals (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:40am, 1:30, 4:20, 7:15, 10:00pm 
In Time (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:20pm 

J. Edgar ( digital): Fri-Tue, 10:55am, 12:35,2:15,4:00, 5:35, 7:15, 
8:55, 10:35pm 

Jack and Jill (digital): Fri, 9:45am, 10:55, 12:10, 1:35,2:45,4:05, 
5:20, 6:40, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30pm; Sat, 9:45am, 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 
6:40, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30pm; Sun, 9:45am, 10:55, 12:10, 2:45, 
5:20, 6:40, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30pm; Mon, 9:45am, 10:55, 12:10, 
1:35, 2:45, 4:05, 5:20, 6:40, 8:00, 9:15, 10:30pm;Tue, 9:45am, 
10:55, 12:10, 1:35, 2:45, 4:05, 5:20, 8:00, 10:30pm 
The Muppets (digital): Tue, 12:01am 
Paranormal Activity 3 (digital): Fri-Tue, 8:00, 10:35 
Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri-Tue, 9:50am, 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50pm 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri-Tue, 11:05am, 1:35,4:05,6:35,9:05pm 
Real Steel (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:00am, 1:20, 4:40pm 
Opera: Satyagraha: Sat, 11:55am 

NCM Fathom: The Sleeping Beauty: Sun, 1:30pm; Tue, 6:30pm 
Tower Heist (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:30am, 1:25, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30pm 
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (digital): 

Fri-Tue, 10:20am, 10:45, 11:30, 12:15, 1:20, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 
4:20, 4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:20, 7:45, 8:30, 9:15, 10:20, 10:45pm 
The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 (XD): Fri-Tue, 10:00am, 
1:00,4:00,7:00,10:00pm 

A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas (3-D): Fri-Tue, 10:05am, 
12:35,3:05,5:35,8:10,10:35pm 


TINSELTOWN SOUTH South 1-35 & Stassney, 326-3800. 
$10 “special event” ticket prices apply to Indian films. 

Call theatre for Nov. 23-24 showtimes. 

Contagion (digital): Fri-Tue, 10:10pm 
Courageous (digital): Fri, 5:00pm; Sat, 1:20pm; Sun, 11:30am, 
6:40, 9:40pm; Mon-Tue, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 
Happy Feet Two (3-D): Fri, 3:30, 4:50, 6:10, 7:30, 8:50, 10:10; 
Sat-Sun, 11:30am, 12:50, 2:10, 3:30, 4:50, 6:10, 7:30, 8:50, 
10:10pm; Mon-Tue, 3:30, 4:50, 6:10, 7:30, 8:50, 10:10 
Happy FeetTwo (digital): Fri, 4:10, 5:30, 6:50, 8:10,9:30; 

Sat-Sun, 12:10, 1:30, 2:50, 4:10, 5:30, 6:50, 8:10, 9:30; 

Mon-Tue, 4:10, 5:30, 6:50, 8:10, 9:30 
The Help (digital): Fri, 3:30, 6:50; Sat-Sun, 12:10, 3:30, 6:50; 
Mon-Tue, 3:30, 6:50 

Immortals (3-D): Fri, 4:05, 5:05, 6:55, 7:50, 9:40, 10:35; 

Sat-Sun, 11:35am, 1:25, 2:20, 4:05, 5:05, 6:55, 7:50, 9:40, 
10:35pm; Mon-Tue, 4:05, 5:05, 6:55, 7:50, 9:40, 10:35 
Immortals (digital): Fri, 3:15, 6:00, 8:45; Sat-Sun, 12:30, 3:15, 
6:00, 8:45; Mon-Tue, 3:15, 6:00, 8:45 
In Time (digital): Fri, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50; Sat-Sun, 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 
9:50; Mon-Tue, 4:30, 7:10,9:50 
Jack and Jill (digital): Fri, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:40, 9:10, 10:20; 
Sat-Sun, 12:15, 1:35, 2:45, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:40, 9:10, 10:20; 
Mon-Tue, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:40, 9:10, 10:20 
Johnny English Reborn (digital): Fri, 6:15pm; Sat-Sun, 12:35, 6:15; 
Mon-Tue, 6:15pm 

Paranormal Activity 3 (digital): Fri, 5:00, 7:20, 9:45; 

Sat-Sun, 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:45; Mon-Tue, 5:00, 7:20, 9:45 
Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00; Sat-Sun, 11:40am, 2:00, 
4:20, 6:40, 9:00pm; Mon-Tue, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00 
Puss in Boots (digital): Fri, 3:05, 5:25, 7:45, 10:05; 

Sat-Sun, 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 7:45, 10:05; Mon-Tue, 3:05, 5:25, 
7:45, 10:05 

Rockstar (digital): Fri, 3:00, 6:25,9:50; Sat-Sun, 11:35am, 3:00, 
6:25, 9:50pm; Mon-Tue, 4:30, 8:30 

The Three Musketeers (digital): Fri-Tue, 3:25, 9:05 


VIOLET CROWN CINEMA 434 W. Second, 495-9600. 
Four-hour parking validation in attached garage with ticket 
purchase. Reserved seating; bar and cafe on-site. 

Call theatre for showtimes. 

*J. Edgar: Fri-Sun, 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30, 10:00 
*Margin Call: Fri-Sun, 11:50am, 5:10pm 
*Melancholia: Fri-Sun, 12:50, 2:30, 3:30, 6:15, 7:20, 9:00 
The Skin I Live In: Fri-Sun, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 
Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview: Fri-Sun, 11:00am 
Take Shelter: Fri-Sun, 12:00pm 


WESTGATE 11 South Lamar & Ben White, 899-271 7. 
Discounts daily before 6pm. Cost for 3-D shows is regular 
ticket price plus a $3.50 premium. Call theatre for Nov. 
23-24 showtimes. 

50/50: Fri-Tue, 2:45, 7:45 

* Happy FeetTwo: Fri-Tue, 11:05am, 11:30, 1:35,4:05, 
4:30,9:40pm 

* Happy FeetTwo (3-D): Fri-Tue, 2:00, 7:10 
immortals (3-D): Fri-Tue, 12:25,2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:25 
In Time: Fri-Tue, 12:15, 5:10, 10:15 

J. Edgar: Fri-Tue, 12:30, 3:40, 6:50, 10:00 

Jack and Jill: Fri-Tue, 12:10, 2:40, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 

Moneyball: Fri-Tue, 7:05, 10:05 

*The Muppets: Wed-Thu (11/24), 11:30am, 2:05, 4:45, 

7:20, 10:00pm 

*Puss in Boots: Fri-Tue, 11:50am, 2:10, 4:20, 6:45, 9:10pm 
*Puss in Boots (3-D): Fri-Tue, 12:20, 2:35, 4:55 
*Tower Heist: Fri-Tue, 11:55am, 2:20,4:50, 7:20,9:55pm 
*The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1: Fri-Sat, 10:30am, 
11:00, 1:20, 1:50, 4:10, 4:40, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 9:20, 9:50, 
10:20pm; Sun-Tue, 11:00am, 1:20, 1:50, 4:10, 4:40, 6:30, 7:00, 
7:30,9:20,9:50,10:20pm 


68 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


FILM LISTINGS 


THE TWILIGHT SAGA: 

BREAKING DAWN - PART 1 

D: Bill Condon; with Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Taylor 
Lautner, Billy Burke, Peter Facinelli. (PG-13, 117 min.) 

Not reviewed at press time. Can the now- 
married Bella and Edward breed without 
causing further affronts to all that humanity 
holds dear? With the release of the first part 
of this final film, the twilight of this phenom- 
enon draws nigh. The film was not screened 
in time for deadline and will be reviewed next 
week. - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lake Creek, Alamo Lamar, Alamo Village, 
Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark Meadows, 
Cinemark Stone Hill Town Center, Flix Brewhouse, 
Highland, Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, Metropolitan, 
Millennium, Tinseltown North, Westgate 

Ui I hi 1*1 q — 

*Full-length reviews available online at 
austinchronicle.com. Dates at end of reviews 
indicate original publication date. 

ANONYMOUS 

D: Roland Emmerich; with Rhys Ifans, Vanessa Redgrave, Joely 
Richardson, David Thewlis, Sebastian Armesto, Rate Spall, Edward 
Hogg, Xavier Samuel, Sam Reid, Trystan Gravelle. (PG-13, 130 min.) 

It turns out the “soul of his age,” William 
Shakespeare (Spall), was actually a megalomania- 
cal drunken spendthrift and did not, indeed, pen 
even one of his iconic plays, sonnets, or poems. 

The truth of the matter, by way of this conspiracy- 
minded period potboiler, is that Edward de Vere 
(Ifans) wrote the lot and was relegated to history’s 
dustbin due to Byzantine political intrigue. Or so it 
goes according to Anonymous, a messy, often goofy, 
and very occasionally entertaining melodrama from 
Roland Emmerich. Despite all the incest, dramatic 
thievery, flounces, ruff, and kohl, Anonymous has 
the tone of a Hallmark Channel holiday special gone 
bat-shit crazy. Shakespeare in Love it ain’t, but the 
wealth of stage and screen talent on display, most 
if not all of whom have essayed one or another of 
the Bard’s characters in the past, make for a pleas- 
antly ridiculous descent into utter confabulation. 
(10/28/2011) 

★★ - Marc Savlov 

Arbor, Barton Creek Square 

COURAGEOUS 

D: Alex Kendrick; with Alex Kendrick, Ken Bevel, Kevin Downes, Ben 
Davies. (PG-13, 129 min.) 

In this faith-based drama from the makers of 
Fireproof, four policemen struggle with their roles as 
husbands and fathers. (09/30/2011) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 
CM Round Rock, Tinseltown South 

FOOTLOOSE 

D: Craig Brewer; with Kenny Wormald, Julianne Hough, Dennis Quaid, 
Ray McKinnon, Miles Teller, Patrick John Flueger, Ziah Colon, Andie 
MacDowell, Kim Dickens, Ser’Darius William Blain. (PG-13, 113 min.) 

Finally, along comes a remake that’s not a just 
a mindless retread. Craig Brewer’s Footloose man- 
ages to update the popular 1984 original for a new 
generation without completely pandering to the con- 
temporary box-office gods. First, let’s remember that 
the original was no great classic of cinema, though 
its heartfelt story about stifled teenagers, small- 
town myopia, and the joyous, regenerative powers 
of music and dance has remained resonant through 
the decades. The remake retains the eternal-teen 
allure and angst of young upstart Ren MacCormack 
(Kenny Wormald). Julianne Hough as Ariel Moore, 
the preacher’s daughter who wants to be a bad girl, 
reveals great screen presence, although her sexi- 
ness seems a bit sophisticated for a high schooler. 
Footloose 2.0 stumbles at a couple of points, but 
Brewer has a firm command of the material and 
a great sense of how to film dance sequences. 

Can’t wait to see what this filmmaker does next. 
(10/14/2011) 

★★★ - Marjorie Baumgarten 

CM Cedar Park, Metropolitan 


©THE IDES OF MARCH 

D: George Clooney; with George Clooney, Ryan Gosling, Philip 
Seymour Hoffman, Paul Giamatti, Evan Rachel Wood, MarisaTomei, 
Jeffrey Wright, Max Minghella. (R, 102 min.) 

The gray slush of Ohio in winter provides a suit- 
able backdrop for George Clooney’s morality tale 
about American politics. This story about the erosion 
of idealism and loyalty is told from the perspective 
of Stephen Meyers (Ryan Gosling), press secretary 
for Clooney’s Democratic Gov. Mike Morris, who is 
engaged in a presidential primary in Ohio. Meyers’ 
mentor is Paul Zara (Philip Seymour Hoffman), whose 
tired, rumpled, and flabby demeanor and constant 
second-guessing tells us everything we need to know 
about the mental state of political operatives. He is 
matched in kind by Tom Duffy (Paul Giamatti), the 
campaign manager of Morris’ rival, who is equally 
rumpled and flabby but just a little bit meaner. Add 
to that Gosling again proving his vast versatility 
and Marisa Tomei as a hustling journalist trolling 
for a scoop. Despite some narrative missteps, the 
perfectly cast Ides of March still ranks as one of 
the season’s most intelligent and polished films. 
(10/07/2011) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 

Metropolitan 

IN TIME 

D: Andrew Niccol; with Amanda Seyfried, Justin Timberlake, Alex 
Pettyfer, Cillian Murphy, Olivia Wilde. (PG-13, 109 min.) 

In Time shares similar DNA with writer/director 
Andrew Niccol’s 1997 debut, Gattaca, as both dabble 
in a seemingly refined future that’s dystopian for 
the have-nots, but In Time is a far chintzier produc- 
tion. The concept is that in the near future, time has 
become the most precious commodity. To combat 
overcrowding, all humans stop aging at 25 and their 
clocks start counting down. Wages are paid with 
added time to one’s lifespan, while rent and bread 
money are subtracted. So the rich stockpile centu- 
ries, and the poor drop dead in the street. There’s 
concept, and then there’s execution, and Niccol’s 




7PM EVERY FRIDAY 

xzzzzzzzzzzr 

NOV. 18 

El Hijo de la Novia 
(Son of the Bride) 

EZZXZZZZZZZZE 

DEC. 2 

Priceless 

WITH 

AUDREY TAUTOU! 


zzzzzzzzzzzr 

DEC. 9 

La Gran Vida 
(Living It Up) 

with SELMA HAYEK 


710 E. 4IST 

WALLER CREEK SCHOOL BLDG. THEATRE 

WWW.FREESTYLE 

LANGUAGECENTER.COM 


Special Blanton Museum Film Screening: 

FOLD 


CRUMPLE 

CRUSH 

THE ART OF EL ANATSUI 


Thursday, November 17, 6pm 
Blanton Auditorium, Edgar A. Smith Building 

Free Admission 

Filmed over three years in Italy, Nigeria, and the United States 
by art historian, curator, and African art expert Susan Vogel, 
Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of El Anatsui gives an insider’s view 
of artist El Anatsui’s practice. (2011, dir. Susan Vogel, 53 min.) 



The Blanton 

Museum of Art 


The University of Texas at Austin | MLK at Congress 

Austin, TX 78701 | www.blantonmuseum.org | (512) 471-7324 



DINNER » DRINKS » MOVIES » EVENTS 


SPOTLIGHT EVENTS] 

• COMING SOON TO AN ALAMO NEAR YOU « 



THANKSGIVING DINNER 

Thurs. 1 1/24 @ Ritz 

Order the optional “Thanksgiving 
Dinner” ticket and you’ll not only 
get admission to the show, but 
also a heaping plate of all these 
classic hits! Featuring: Turkey and 
gravy, stuffing and pie! 


MELANCHOLIA 
Opens 11/18 <§> South Lamar 

Before each screening of 
MELANCHOLIA we are going 
to be showing an interview that 
Devin Faraci of Badass Digest did 
with Lars von Trier himself! 



The Late Show: 

THE ADVENTURES OF 
BUCKAROO BANZAI 
11/18 &19@ Ritz 

Witness the world’s leading 
surgeon/inventor/guitar-slinger 
battle soulless Lectroids from the 
8th Dimension! 



AV Geeks: 

BALLS OUT 
f 1/20 @ Ritz , South Lamar 

Alamo favorites the A/V Geeks 
return with another mind- 
bending show curated from their 
collection over 24,000 16mm 
educational films. 




UT FOOTBALL 
1 1/1 9 @ South Lamar 

The Drafthouse is the premiere 
spot for watching UT football in 
Austin. This show is free, but you 
can guarantee yourself a seat by 
purchasing a $5 Food/Beverage 
voucher. 

Master Pancake Celebrates: 

HANKSGIVING 
11/18811/19 @ Ritz 

You won’t want to miss this comic 
retrospective of the T-man’s 
oeuvre, because for every SAVING 
PRIVATE RYAN under his belt, 
there’s a TURNER AND HOOCH 
lurking in his closet. 

Food & Film: 

BREAKING DAWN FEAST 
11/21 @Lake Creek 
11/22 @ South Lamar 

Come sink your teeth into part 
of the final installment of the 
Twilight Saga with this full, multi- 
course FEAST w/ food and drink 
pairings inspired by the series. 


ALSO SCREENING: Action Pack Sing-Along: Labyrinth 
(11/17) » Action Pack Sing-Alongs: Ye-Z In Love (11/17) > 
Austin Alpha Foundation Presents Purple Rain (11/17) » The 
Rocky Horror Picture Show (11/19) » Quote-Alongs: The Big 
Lebowski (11/22) » Music Monday: Karp Lives (11/21) » Music 
Monday: I Want My MTV (11/21) » Terror Tuesday: Infra-man 
(11/22) » AFS Essential Cinema: The Awful Truth (11/22) » 
Weird Wednesday: Blood Freak (11/23) » Free Kids Club: 
Freaky Friday, 1976 (11/26) » 


BEST THEATER IN AUSTIN! 


» TIX & MORE: DRAFTHOUSE.COM 
» ALL SHOWS 1 8 & UP / NO INFANTS 
» HOST YOUR NEXT PRIVATE EVENT 
» CALL VENUE RENTAL @ 512-407-9531 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 69 





FILM LISTINGS 


Steve Jobs: 

The Lost Interview 

D: Paul Sen. (2011, NR, 70 min.) In 1995, dur- 
ing the making of his TV series Triumph of the 
Nerds about the birth of the PC, Bob Cringely 
did a memorable, hourlong interview with Steve 
Jobs. Recently, a VHS copy was found, cleaned 
up with modern technology, and put into context 
by Cringely. @Violet Crown, Friday-Sunday, 11am. 



cornball double entendres about time imbue the film 
with a hokeyness it never recovers from. Casting 
Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried can only go 
so far to counteract the film’s fundamental unhip- 
ness. They have some fun as class warriors on the 
lam, but it’s all just big-budget dress-up in a futures- 
cape that reeks of phoniness. (11/04/2011) 

★ - Kimberley Jones 

Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Round Rock, Gateway, Tinseltown North, 
Tinseltown South, Westgate 

O J. EDGAR 

D: Clint Eastwood; with Leonardo Dicaprio, Naomi Watts, Armie Hammer, 
Judi Dench, Josh Lucas, Stephen Root, Dermot Mulroney. (R, 136 min.) 

It seems right that the man who played Dirty Harry 
would now, in his ridiculously productive twilight, turn 
his attention to the legacy of J. Edgar Hoover, played 
with great virtuosity by Leonardo DiCaprio. For all the 
good Hoover accomplished in bringing the bureau into 
the modern age of forensics by using scrupulous sci- 
entific methods and establishing a national database 
of fingerprints, the man was also undone by his bigotry, 
secrecy, narrow-minded dogma, and unbridled power to 
ruin lives. Eastwood gives us both sides of this figure 
- a portrait of a full human being and not just as the 
butt of an unfounded joke about closeted transves- 
tites. The time frame jumps around, spanning decades 
in a single leap, but it doesn’t strain the structure. 
Eastwood and DiCaprio have delivered a nuanced story 
about a man, a mythos, and an institution that relies 
on the facts rather than the legend. (11/11/2011) 
★★★V - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lake Creek, Alamo Village, Arbor, Barton Creek 
Square, CM Cedar Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round 
Rock, Southpark Meadows, Flix Brewhouse, Highland, 
iPic, Metropolitan, Tinseltown North, Violet Crown, 
Westgate 

JOHNNY ENGLISH REBORN 

D: Oliver Parker; with Rowan Atkinson, Dominic West, Gillian 
Anderson, Rosamund Pike, Daniel Kaluuya, Richard Schiff, Pik Sen 
Urn. (PG, 101 min.) 

Few in North America have been clamoring for a 
sequel to Rowan Atkinson’s 2003 James Bond spoof 
Johnny English. Atkinson’s rubber-faced antics are an 
acquired taste, yet those who respond to him do so 
with gales of laughter. The plot of this sequel is incon- 
sequential: Former MI7 (ha!) agent Johnny English 
(Atkinson) is called back into service from his exile in 
an Eastern monastery where he’s been studying since 
his unexplained debacle in Mozambique. Seems he’s 
the only agent who might be able to foil a plot against 
the Chinese premier. English is partnered with young 
greenhorn Agent Tucker (Daniel Kaluuya). Although 
the Bond references are numerous, and the blunder- 
ing English is a goldmine of physical humor, Oliver 
Parker’s pedestrian direction does little to accentuate 
the jokes. Atkinson’s fans are likely to rejoice as the 
comedian twists his face and body to and fro, but the 
rest of us will not be recruited. (10/21/2011) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 

Movies 8, Tinseltown South 


LIKE CRAZY 

D: Drake Doremus; with Felicity Jones, Anton Yelchin, Jennifer 
Lawrence, Charlie Bewley, Alex Kingston, Oliver Muirhead, Finola 
Hughes. (PG-13, 90 min.) 

Two college kids sit across from each other, tenta- 
tive, shyly smiling, and on a first date. First there’s 
Anna (Jones), British and bucktoothed lovely, then 
Jacob (Yelchin), who is all gentleness. Director Drake 
Doremus ( Douchebag ) foreshadows here a defining 
fact of Anna and Jacob’s relationship: They do not 
share the same space. Flamed with love, Anna over- 
stays her student visa and is barred from re-entry to 
the States. The bulk of the film follows Jacob flying 
back and forth between Los Angeles and London for 
fitful reunions and visa appeals, broken by scenes of 
their lives apart. There’s no question that the actors 
and filmmakers have fashioned a compelling love 
story of a certain age - which is not to be confused 
for a love story for the ages. In its inability to explore 
Anna and Jacob’s evolving relationship adultly, Like 
Crazy is a pantomime of its sweet but depthless 
young lovers. (11/11/2011) 

★★★ - Kimberley Jones 

Arbor 

THE LION KING 3D 

D: Roger Allers, Rob Minkhoff; with the voices of Jonathan Taylor 
Thomas, Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Nathan Lane, Jeremy 
Irons, Whoopi Goldberg, Cheech Marin. (G, 89 min.) 

Disney has retrofitted its much-loved, Hamlet - lite 
family film The Lion King for this limited, 3-D, theatri- 
cal run. (09/16/2011) - Kimberley Jones 

Movies 8 

O MARGIN CALL 

D: J.C. Chandor; with Kevin Spacey, Stanley Tucci, Zachary Quinto, 
Paul Bettany, Jeremy Irons, Penn Badgley, Simon Baker, Demi Moore. 
(R, 109 min.) 

Unlikely to be either the tea party or Occupy 
America’s favorite film of the year, Margin Call 
is nevertheless a surprisingly adroit effort to A) 
explain the birth pains of our current financial 
woes, and B) show what it might have been like in 
the first few hours of an early investment trading 
firm casualty. Chief among the titans of numero- 
logical hocus-pocus depicted here is a decidedly 
reptilian Irons as the CEO, who is helicoptered in 
after a youngblood risk-assessment drone (Quinto) 
spots the metaphorical iceberg in the files of just- 
fired analyst Eric Dale (Tucci). Spacey plays Sam 
Rogers, the lone man of semi-conscience forced 
by circumstance to damn the torpedoes (and pos- 
sibly his soul). It’s a bravely nuanced performance, 
but, ultimately, Sam is no better than these other 
pecuniary freebooters. Still, you come away feeling 
a little sorry for the guy. Not very, but it’s an impres- 
sive achievement given the nightmare narrative. 
(10/28/2011) 

★★★ - Marc Savlov 

Violet Crown 


Nothing Sacred 


D: William A. Wellman; with Fredric March , Carole 
Lombard. (1937, NR, 75 min.) Association of 
Moving Image Archivists. This comic romance 
observes a news reporter’s pursuit of a story 
that lacks truth but sells papers. His subject 
is no victim either; all’s well until they fall in 
love. This great screwball comedy was restored 
from the original nitrate camera negative. See 
“To Preserve and Project,” p.43, for more on 
the AMIA screenings. @Paramount, Saturday, 
8pm; free. 



The Awful Truth 


D; Leo McCarey; with Irene Dunne, Cary Grant, 
Ralph Bellamy. (1937, NR, 92 min.) Austin Film 
Society: And It Feels So Good - Comedies of 
Remarriage. This comedy is a hilarious match-up 
between Cary Grant and Irene Dunne, with the 
wonderful Ralph Bellamy cast in his pigeonholed 
role as the fifth wheel. In its own subversive way, 
The Awful Truth allows a bitterly divorced couple 
to find the real truth of their relationship. For 
more on this series curated by the Chronicle's 
Kimberley Jones, see “Making Love and War,” 
p.43. @Alamo Lamar, Tuesday, 7pm. 



© MARTHA MARCY MAY 
MARLENE 

D: Sean Durkin; with Elizabeth Olsen, John Hawkes, Sarah Paulson, 
Brady Corbet, Hugh Dancy. (R, 101 min.) 

On an isolated farm in upstate New York, a teen- 
age girl, Martha (Olsen), works the fields, does 
chores, and communes with both nature and a 
band of off-grid Luddites led by the wiry, charismatic 
Patrick (Hawkes). “You look more like a Marcy May,” 
he tells her before she’s sexually initiated - raped 
is the correct word here - into what turns out to 
be a cult. Director Durkin cleverly messes with the 
narrative structure as Martha flees the group and 
eventually arrives at the home of her well-to-do sister 
Lucy (Paulson) and brother-in-law Ted (Dancy). This 
haunting feature has a dreamy timelessness that 
transcends our ultrawired era. Like its scared, dam- 
aged, and terribly confused protagonist, Durkin’s film 
seems to exist in its own fractured dream state. 

It’s hypnotic, narcotic, and trembling on the verge of 
either dread or redemption or some hazy state of 
nothingness in between. (11/04/2011) 

- Marc Savlov 

Alamo Lamar, Arbor 

© MONEYBALL 

D: Bennett Miller; with Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman, 
Robin Wright, Kerris Dorsey, Chris Pratt, Reed Diamond. (PG-13, 133 min.) 

Moneyball is a smart, funny, and thoughtful base- 
ball movie that tells us more about what happens 
in the managers’ offices than out on the ball field. 
Based on Michael Lewis’ 2003 book, Moneyball 
details the true story of the turnaround strategy 
employed by Oakland A’s General Manager Billy 
Beane (played by Brad Pitt) in the team’s 2002 
season. With the help of Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), a 
Yale economics graduate who concocts mathemati- 
cal formulas to forecast wins, Beane repopulates his 
roster with undervalued athletes after his top three 
players are purchased by wealthier teams, and in this 
way the little guys might be able to even the playing 
field. While some of its tangents add little to the 
story, Moneyball is certain to appeal to both sports 
fans and nonfans alike, and, even when the film is 
shagging flies, it’s an engaging pleasure to watch. 
(09/23/2011) 

- Marjorie Baumgarten 
Hill Country Galleria, iPic, Westgate 

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 

D: Henry Joost, Ariel Schulman; with Katie Featherston, Chris Smith, 
Sprague Grayden, Lauren Bittner, Brian Boland. (R, 81 min.) 

Well, I’ll be damned to hell! This third outing in 
the faux documentary/found footage supernatural 
shocker series finally gets things right. This one 
fucking creeped me out. Helmed by Catfish directors 
Joost and Schulman, Paranormal Activity 3 is still no 
one’s idea of a classic horror film, but it delivers the 
gotcha moments with subtlety and brio compared 
with its clunky predecessors. The plot, what there 


is of it, finds a cache of old VHS tapes, circa 1988, 
purporting to show what happened to the frightened 
Rey family, led by wedding videographer dad Dennis 
(Smith) and mom Julie (Bittner), who begin to experi- 
ence odd goings-on after youngest daughter Kristi 
(Brown) starts chatting up her “invisible friend” Toby. 
Things go to hell from there, literally. Paranormal 
Activity 3 has enough jolts, frissons, and downright 
freak-outs to qualify as the best teen date movie of 
the season, if not the year. Boo. Scary. (10/21/2011) 
★★★ - Marc Savlov 

CM Round Rock, Gateway, Lakeline, Tinseltown North, 
Tinseltown South 

© PUSS IN BOOTS 

D: Chris Miller; with the voices of Antonio Banderas, Salma Hayek, 
Zach Galifianakis, Billy Bob Thornton, Amy Sedaris, Constance Marie, 
Guillermo del Toro. (PG, 90 min.) 

This animated spin-off from the Shrek trilogy 
presents the origin story of the green ogre’s side- 
kick, Puss in Boots. DreamWorks’ hero’s tale is 
bolstered by solid storytelling and voice work, more 
deranged fairy-tale mash-ups, and an abundance of 
feline cuteness. Antonio Banderas’ Puss is at once a 
lover and a fighter, part Zorro and part Pepe Le Pew, 
and his pairing with Salma Hayek, who provides the 
voice of Kitty Softpaws, is muy simpatico. The plot 
takes us back to Puss’ childhood in an orphanage, 
where he becomes best friends with Humpty Dumpty 
(Galifianakis), a large egg who tricks the cat into a 
bank robbery that goes wrong, leaving Puss in exile 
and Humpty with a chip on his shoulder. There’s a lot 
of chase and rescue to fill out the meager storyline, 
but the top-notch voice work keeps us attuned to the 
screen. Puss in Boots is cute and entertaining but 
hardly purr-feet. (10/28/2011) 

★★★ - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lake Creek, Alamo Village, Barton Creek Square, 
CM Cedar Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, 
Southpark Meadows, Cinemark Stone Hill Town Center, 
Flix Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, 
Tinseltown North, Tinseltown South, Westgate 

REAL STEEL 

D: Shawn Levy; with Hugh Jackman, Dakota Goyo, Evangeline Lilly, 
Anthony Mackie, Kevin Durand, Hope Davis, James Rebhorn, Olga 
Fonda, Karl Yune. (PG-13, 127 min.) 

Real Steel may have a hardened outer shell, but it’s 
pure marshmallow on the inside. This kids’ film mixes 
the heart of come-from-behind boxing dramas with the 
geeky gadget gestalt of films like The Transformers. 
Thinly derived from a Richard Matheson short story, 
Real Steel is set in a debased near-future in which 
robot boxing is all the rage. Charlie Kenton (Jackman) 
is a former champion boxer who now hustles robot 
matches. He’s a gruff, unlikable guy, and when he’s 
informed of his long-lost son, Max (Goyo), whose 
mother has just died, Charlie makes self-serving finan- 
cial arrangements for the boy’s care, never guessing he 


Les Blank 

Retrospective: Part 1 

Several of the music-related films of great 
documentary maker Les Blank are featured in 
this two-night retrospective (Friday, Nov. 18, and 
Sunday, Nov. 20). The first program includes “The 
Sun’s Gonna Shine” (1969, 10 min.); “The Blues 
Accordin’ to Lightnin’ Hopkins” (1969, 31 min.); 
Blank’s New Orleans portrait, Always for Pleasure 
(1978, 82 min.); “Cigarette Blues” (1985, 6 min.), 
and “A Well Spent Life” (1971, 44 min), about 
the Texas bluesman Mance Lipscomb. 

@Texas Spirit Theater, Friday, 6pm. 



“The Blues AccordirT to LightirT Hopkins ’ 7 


70 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 



FILM LISTINGS 


The Adventures of 
Buckaroo Banzai Across 
the 8th Dimension 

D: W.D. Richter; with Peter Weller , John Lithgow, 
Ellen Barkin, Jeff Goldblum , Christopher Lloyd. 
(1983, PG , 103 min.) Late Show. Wonderfully 
fun, albeit markedly chaotic and incoherent, 
this is one of those movies that has earned a 
strong cult reputation on the basis of its mile-a- 
minute cross-cultural references and pseudosci- 
entific mumbo jumbo. (*) @Alamo Ritz, Friday- 
Saturday, 11:30pm; Sunday, 10pm. 



and his son will bond before the summer is through. 
The film’s predictability is a serious drawback, but Night 
at the Museum director Shawn Levy hits all the right 
notes that should guarantee the film’s appeal to young 
and old joystick junkies who, despite outward appear- 
ances, harbor sentimental hearts. (10/07/2011) 

★★V - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Lakeline, Metropolitan, Tinseltown North 

THE RUM DIARY 

D: Bruce Robinson; with Johnny Depp, Michael Rispoli, Amber Heard, 
Giovanni Ribisi, Richard Jenkins, Aaron Eckhart, Bill Smitrovich. 

(R, 120 min.) 

Adapted from Hunter S. Thompson’s first novel, 
this film version is more aptly described as a sloe gin 
fizz. Set in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 1960, Depp plays 
Thompson’s alter ego, Paul Kemp, a budding journo- 
cum-novelist who’s living in suspended, rum-infused 
doldrums while working for the English-language news- 
paper, The San Juan Star. He’s joined in the sugary 
haze by seasoned newshounds Sala (Rispoli), the pho- 
tographer, and Ribisi’s prune of a writer, Moburg. Kemp, 
socializing with the best and worst of them, eventually 
catches the eye of Chenault (Heard), the sigh-worthy 
wife of yanqui developer Sanderson. What The Rum 
Diary lacks in narrative astonishment it almost makes 
up for in boozy charm. In the end, The Rum Diary feels 
like a work of writerly juvenilia, half-baked but not 
unpleasant. Like the tropical breezes that waft off of 
the screen, it reeks of promise yet to be fulfilled. And 
booze. Lots and lots of booze. (10/28/2011) 

★★ - Marc Savlov 

Alamo Ritz, Metropolitan 

©THE SKIN I LIVE IN 

D: Pedro Almodovar; with Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya, Marisa 
Paredes, Jan Cornet, Roberto Alamo, Blanca Suarez. (R, 117 min., 
subtitled) 

An elaborate puzzle of a film that confounds expec- 
tations in the grandest of ways, this tricky masterpiece 
from Almodovar, Spain’s maestro of madness, domi- 
nates every iota of your attention. Antonio Banderas’ 
character, Dr. Robert Ledgard, is a plastic surgeon of 
some renown who long ago lost his wife in an auto- 
mobile accident. Working out of his fortresslike home 
in Toledo, Spain, he also has a live-in patient, a young 
woman, Vera (Anaya), who spends her days garbed 
head-to-toe in a skintight bodysuit and may or may not 
be there of her own inclination. Something very pecu- 
liar, perhaps morally reprehensible, is going on, but 
the exact nature of this outre situation is only revealed 
by the slow, strange turns of fate’s wheel. Banderas’ 
performance is so rich, so complex, and eventually, so 
very dark that it frazzles your brain stem. Almodovar 
blows his characters’ minds, and then yours, and you 
love him for it. Bravo! (11/11/2011) 

★★★★ - Marc Savlov 

Alamo Lamar, Arbor, Violet Crown 


© TAKE SHELTER 

D: Jeff Nichols; with Michael Shannon, Jessica Chastain, Tova 
Stewart, Shea Whigham, Katy Mixon, Kathy Baker. (R, 120 min.) 

Curtis LaForche (Shannon) stands in the wide- 
open expanse of his yard in Ohio, staring at the 
horizon, sensing that something is wrong. Storm 
clouds are massing in the distance, and when the 
rain begins to fall, it has the consistency of motor 
oil. It’s just one of the many troubling sensations 
and nightmarish images Curtis has recently noticed. 
Curtis has what his friend Dewart (Whigham) 
describes as a “good life.” He has a good job; his 
wife, Samantha (Chastain), is beautiful and sup- 
portive; and his young daughter, Hannah (Stewart), 
though deaf, is developing nicely. So, is he going 
crazy, or is he just tuned in to some larger apoca- 
lypse brewing? Writer/director and Austin resident 
Jeff Nichols has crafted a deeply unsettling movie 
with Take Shelter. The film’s epilogue is sure to be 
a source of contention for many viewers. Without 
disclosing anything, let’s just say that it is a major 
misstep in an otherwise beautifully modulated 
movie. (10/28/2011) 

★★★V - Marjorie Baumgarten 

Alamo Lamar, Arbor, Violet Crown 

THE THREE MUSKETEERS 

D: Paul W.5. Anderson; with Logan Lerman, Milla Jovovich, Orlando 
Bloom, Ray Stevenson, Luke Evans, Christoph Waltz, Matthew 
Macfadyen, Til Schweiger, Mads Mikkelsen. (PG-13, 110 min.) 

Have we retained nothing of the lessons of 
Hudson Hawk ? Like that early Nineties comical 
disaster, The Three Musketeers hinges on the 
secret machinations of Leonardo da Vinci. It’s 
worth pointing out that when the Musketeers - roll 
call: Porthos (Stevenson), Athos (Macfadyen), and 
Aramis (Evans) - raid Leonardo’s vault for the 
schematics for a flying war machine, they flood 
the underground lair on their way out, destroying 
thousands of documents in the process. That care- 
lessness doesn’t so much as raise an eyebrow; I 
mention it here only to highlight the rancid taste of 
these early scenes, which are an indiscriminately 
violent bore to behold. Still, once you accept Paul 
W.S. Anderson’s entirely unnecessary adaptation on 
its own terms (nonsensical, underachieving), it has 
its limited charms, which include a snigger-inducing 
alphabet soup of accents, a standout rooftop sword- 
fight, and British comedian James Corden as the 
Musketeers’ put-upon manservant. (10/28/2011) 
★★ - Kimberley Jones 

Tinseltown South 

© TOWER HEIST 

D: Brett Ratner; with Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy, Casey Affleck, Alan 
Alda, Matthew Broderick, Tea Leoni, Michael Pena, Gabourey Sidibe, 
Judd Hirsch, Stephen Henderson. (PG-13, 105 min.) 

Alert to the righteous rage of the 99%-ers and 
canny about how to mine that rage for laughs, Tower 
Heist is like Ocean’s Eleven meets class conscious- 
ness. Ben Stiller plays Josh Kovacs, the manager 
of a luxury condo in Manhattan called the Tower, 
where he commands a small army of housekeepers, 
concierges, and security guards. When the Tower’s 
penthouse-dwelling big-shot investor Arthur Shaw 
(Alda) is taken into federal custody for some funny 
business with the books, his entire staff’s pension 
plans are gone, and the people-pleasing building 
manager wants revenge. Going rogue, Josh gathers 
a motley crew - including Eddie Murphy’s ex-con 
Slide - to filch the $20 million Shaw has hidden in 
his penthouse. A constitutionally glib director, Brett 
Ratner is nevertheless a professional: He’s made 
a lean and likable action comedy that motors along 
at a satisfying clip. Tower Heist nails the humor, all 
right, but also, quite crucially, humanizes the high 
concept. (11/04/2011) 

- Kimberley Jones 

Alamo Lake Creek, Barton Creek Square, CM Cedar 
Park, Hill Country Galleria, CM Round Rock, Southpark 
Meadows, Cinemark Stone Hill Town Center, Flix 
Brewhouse, Highland, Gateway, iPic, Lakeline, 
Metropolitan, Tinseltown North, Westgate 


A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 
3D CHRISTMAS 

D: Todd Strauss-Schulson; with Kal Penn, John Cho, Neil Patrick 
Harris, Thomas Lennon, Danny Trejo, Paula Garces. (R, 89 min.) 

This is the first of the three Harold and Kumar 
titles in which the weed-loving pair aren’t actively 
coming or going, and it shows. A grinning but tooth- 
less comedy, this Christmas-themed outing pales in 
inventiveness compared to the original. Ah well. We’ve 
all gotten a little older, haven’t we? Hell, Harold (Cho) 
doesn’t even smoke pot anymore. Married and settled 
in the suburbs, he wants to give his wife Maria 
(Garces) and her clan (including Trejo’s gruff Papf) 
the perfect Christmas. That plan goes up in smoke 
when the tree is accidentally torched during a visit by 
Harold’s estranged best friend, Kumar (Penn), thus 
setting into motion a quest picture with an ingenuity 
deficit. It gets a pretty good buzz going with a kicky 
Claymation nightmarescape, Cho and Penn’s genial 
rapport, and the picturesque three-dimensioning of 
plumes of pot smoke. But those pleasures are fleet- 
ing - gone, if you will, with the weed. (11/11/2011) 

- Kimberley Jones 
Alamo Lake Creek, Alamo Lamar, Barton Creek Square, 
CM Cedar Park, Southpark Meadows, Cinemark Stone 
Hill Town Center, Highland, Gateway, Metropolitan, 
Tinseltown North 


also playing 

Full-length reviews available online 

at austinchronicle.com. 


ABDUCTION 

Movies 8 

CONTAGION 

★★ Movies 8, Tinseltown South 

© DOLPHIN TALE 

★★★ Lakeline 

0 50/50 

★★★★ Metropolitan, Westgate 

THE HELP 

Movies 8, Tinseltown South 

KILLER ELITE 

★★ Movies 8 

THE SMURFS 

1 Movies 8 

SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN 
THE WORLD IN 4D 

★★★ Movies 8 

THE THING 

Metropolitan 

WARRIOR 

★★★ Movies 8 

WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER? 

★ Movies 8 


THE WAY 

D: Emilio Estevez; with Martin Sheen, Deborah Kara Unger, James 
Nesbitt, Tcheky Karyo, Emilio Estevez. (PG-13, 115 min.) 

Adapted from Jack Hitt’s nonfiction book Off the 
Road, The Way stars the grizzled Martin Sheen as Tom, 
an optometrist who travels to Europe to claim the ashes 
of his estranged son, Daniel (writer/di rector/ real-life 
son Emilio Estevez), who died in a freak accident along 
“the Way,” an ancient route of pilgrimage known as the 
El Camino de Santiago. Grimly determined to finish 
what his son started, Tom straps on Daniel’s pack and 
makes the trek. He’s joined by other damaged souls he 
meets along the path, and they coalesce into a kind of 
movie-friendly pack of strays whose idea of a bon cami- 
no involves lots of laughter and good wine. Thematically, 
The Way is spiritual but not terribly religious, kinda 
dopey but admirably sincere. The Way never arrives any- 
where you couldn’t see coming a mile away, but it does 
so with such empathy that its conclusions feel comfort- 
ing rather than predictable. (10/14/2011) 

★★★ - Kimberley Jones 

Arbor 


VIOLET CROWN 


Now Playing 

■ ■ 

MELANCHOLIA 

“A GIANT ACHIEVEMENT. A 
WORK OF GENIUS. Lars von 
Trier's ecstatic magnum opus on 
the themes of depression, 
cataclysm, and the way the world 
might end is a MOVIE MASTER- 
PIECE.” 

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY 

■ — — — — — — — — — — — ■ 

STEVE JOBS: THE LOST INTERVIEW 

Limited engagement; 11/18, 11/19 & 11/20 

“It's a tribute to the singular 
popularity of Steve Jobs that he's 
probably the only talking head 
people would pay to watch for 
more than an hour.” 

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES 


THE DESCENDANTS opens 11/23 


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EL DESEO presents A FILM BY ALMODOVAR 


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CALL THEATRE FOR 
SHOWTIMES AND 
SOUND INFORMATION. 


VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.THESKINILIVEINMOVIE.COM 


Check Film Listings online and on your mobile device for full-length reviews, 
up-to-date showtimes, archives, and more! 


austinchronicle.com/film. 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 71 










NOVEMBER 17-23 




BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN 


THURSDAY 17 

O An Evening With Don Hertzfeldt D. Don 

Hertzfeldt. A selection of the animator’s shorts will 
screen, featuring some of his older favorites and the 
premiere of his newest film, “It’s Such a Beautiful 
Day.” Hertzfeldt will be in attendance for a Q&A. 

See “Beautiful Bitter,” Nov. 11, for an interview with 
Hertzfeldt. @Alamo Lamar, 7pm; sold out. 

Grease Sing-Along (1978) (PG, 112 min.) Action 
Pack. @Alamo Lake Creek, 7pm. 

Labyrinth Sing-Along (1986) D; Jim Henson; with 
David Bowie , Jennifer Connelly. ( PG , 101 min.) Action 
Pack. @Alamo Ritz, 7pm. 

Purple Rain (1984) D: Albert Magnoli; with Prince , 
Apollonia Kotero, Morris Day. (R, 111 min.) Austin 
Alpha Foundation. Proceeds will benefit the Austin 
Alpha Foundation’s scholarship programs and com- 
munity outreach efforts. @Alamo Lamar, 7pm. 

Twilight-a-thon Gorge on the entire series in one 
sitting. @Alamo Lake Creek, 3:30pm; Alamo Village, 
Alamo Lamar, 4pm. 

Ye-Z in Love Sing-Along Action Pack. 

@Alamo Lake Creek, 9pm; Alamo Ritz, 9:45pm. 

SPACES 

CineKink D: Various. Smut City. The films in this 
collection celebrate and explore a wide diversity of 
sexuality. See “Working the Kink Out,” Nov. 11, for 
more on this series. @Spider House, 8pm. 

"Fold Crumple Crush: The Art of El Anatsui” 
(2011) D: Susan Vogel. ( NR , 53 min.) The film will 
be shown in conjunction with the museum’s current 
exhibit of El Anatsui’s work. @Blanton Museum 
Auditorium, UT campus, 6pm. 

1960 (2010) D: Gabriele Salvatores. ( NR , 75 min.) 

I Film del Circolo Italiano. In this documentary, 
newsreel footage from the year 1960 is used to cre- 
ate a portrait of the era. @Mezes Hall, Rm. BO. 306, 
UT campus, 8pm; free. 

Once (2007) D: John Carney; with Glen Hansard , 
Marketa Irglova. (R, 85 min.) Austin Public Library: 
Music in Movies. This delicate Irish import is an 
insightful and endearing reimagining of the musical. 
(*) @Yarborough Branch Library, 6:30pm; free. 


FRIDAY 18 

O The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai 
Across the 8th Dimension (1983) See p.71. 

Hanksgiving Celebration Master Pancake 
Theater. Instead of roasting a turkey, these 
jokesters are roasting the career of Tom Hanks. 
@Alamo Ritz, 7, 10pm. 

O Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview (2011) 

See p.70. 

SPACES 

Dirty Martini and the New Burlesque (2010) 

D: Gary Beeber. ( NR , 60 min.) Jigglewatts Burlesque 
Revue. This film explores the world of the perform- 
ers who have created the new burlesque scene in 
New York City. The Jigglewatts Burlesque Revue will 
perform after the screening. @29th Street Ballroom, 
8, 10:30pm. 

O Home Movies of Silent Film Stars 

Association of Moving Image Archivists. Film stars 
of the silent screen reveal bits of their personalities 
through their home movies. Limited seating avail- 
able in the Foothills II room. @Hyatt Regency Austin, 
8pm; free. 


SUBMISSION INFORMATION: 

The Austin Chronicle is published every Thursday. Info 
is due the Monday of the week prior to the issue date. The 
deadline for the Dec. 9 issue is Monday, Nov. 21. Include 
name of event, date, time, location, price, phone number(s), a 
description, and any available photos or artwork. 

Send submissions to the Chronicle, PO Box 49066, 
Austin, TX 78765; fax, 458-6910; or email. 

Contact Marjorie Baumgarten (Special Screenings): 
specialscreenings@austinchronicle.com; 

Wayne Alan Brenner (Offscreen): calendar@austinchronicle.com. 


Lake Tahoe (2008) D: Fernando Eimbcke; with 
Diego Cataho. (NR, 89 min.) Noche de Pelicula. This 
is an award-winning Mexican drama. 

@EsquinaTango, 8:30pm. 

O Les Blank Retrospective: Part 1 Austin 
Music Film Festival. See p.70. 

Son of the Bride (2001) D: Juan Jose Campenella; 
with Ricardo Darin , Hector Alterio, Norma Aleandro. 

(R, 124 min.) Rom-Coms for the Holidays. In this 
Argentinean film, a single dad and businessman 
struggles to keep his personal life afloat while 
undergoing a midlife crisis. (*) (©Freestyle Language 
Center, 7pm; free. 


SATURDAY 19 

O The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai 
Across the 8th Dimension (1983) See p.71. 

Amateur Night: Home Movies From 
American Archives Association of Moving 
Image Archivists. Dramatic, funny, poignant, and 
strange 16mm home movies from famous and 
unknown figures will screen. (©Paramount, 1pm; 
free. 

Hanksgiving Celebration Master Pancake 
Theater. (©Alamo Ritz, 7, 10pm. (See Friday.) 

O Nothing Sacred (1937) See p.70. 

O Passages From James Joyce's Finnegans 
Wake (1979) D; Mary Ellen Bute; with Martin J. 
Kelley. (NR, 92 min.) Association of Moving Image 
Archivists. This experimental filmmaker manipu- 
lates the actual celluloid and uses subtitles, anima- 
tion, and double exposures, among other things, to 
create a visual translation of Joyce’s journey into 
the subconscious. (©Paramount, 10:45am; free. 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) 

(R, 95 min.) Austin fans have been dressing up and 
doing the “Time Warp” thing live for more than three 
decades. For more info, see www.austinrocky.org. 
(©Alamo Village, 11:55pm. 

Satyagraha Metropolitan Opera: Live in HD. 

Richard Croft reprises his acclaimed interpretation 
of Gandhi in Philip Glass’ opera. (*) (©Metropolitan, 
Arbor, Southpark Meadows, Tinseltown North, 
Cinemark Stone Hill Town Center, Hill Country 
Galleria, CM Cedar Park, 11:55am. 

O Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview (2011) 

See p.70. 

We Can't Go Home Again (1976) D: Nicholas 

Ray. (NR, 90 min.) Association of Moving Image 
Archivists. Ray collaborated with his students 
at Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at SUNY 
Binghamton to make this experimental countercul- 
ture film. Using multiple formats, split-screen tech- 
niques, and psychedelic effects, Ray continued to 
tinker with this film until his death in 1979. It was 
recently completed and restored by his wife, Susan 
Ray. (©Paramount, 9am; free. 

O Word Is Out (1977) D: Nancy Adair, Andrew 
Brown , and Rob Epstein. (NR, 133 min.) Association 
of Moving Image Archivists. Restored in 2009, this 
breakthrough film was one of the first on the sub- 
ject of gay identity to be made by gay filmmakers. 
(©Paramount, 3pm; free. 

SPACES 

A Fish Called Wanda (1988) D; Charles Crichton; 
with John Cleese, Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline, 
Michael Palin. (R, 108 min.) Chef du Cinema. Ron 
Deutsch will teach you to prepare a meal based on 
this British caper comedy. (©Central Market North, 
6:30pm; $45. 

The Garden (2008) D: Scott Hamilton Kennedy. 
(NR, 80 min.) Workers Defense Project and Third 
Coast Activist. In this Silverdocs award-winner, 
urban farmers and the city of Los Angeles are 
at odds when a 14-acre community garden in 
South Central is about to be bulldozed. 

@5604 Manor, 7pm. 

The Princess Bride (1987) D: Rob Reiner; with 
Cary Elwes. (PG, 98 min.) @Blue Starlite Drive-In II, 
8pm. 


SUNDAY 20 

O The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai 
Across the 8th Dimension (1983) See p.71. 

Balls Out D: Various. AV Geeks. The AV Geeks 
return with another mind-bending show curated from 
their collection of more than 24,000 16mm educa- 
tional films. This time the theme is balls. @Alamo 
Ritz, 7pm. 

The Sleeping Beauty (2011) NCM Fathom: Ballet 
in Cinema. The Bolshoi Ballet performs Tchaikovsky’s 
ballet live in Moscow, with David Hallberg and 
Svetlana Zakharova in the leads. @Southpark 
Meadows, Tinseltown North, Cinemark Stone Hill 
Town Center, Hill Country Galleria, CM Cedar Park, 
1:30pm. 

O Steve Jobs: The Lost Interview (2011) See 

p.70. 

The Walking Dead TV @ the Alamo. 

@Alamo Lake Creek, 9pm; Alamo Lamar, 9:10pm. 

Ye-Z in Love Sing-Along Action Pack. 

@Alamo Lake Creek, 7pm. (See Thursday, 11/17.) 

SPACES 

Freeway (1996) D; Matthew Bright; with Reese 
Witherspoon, Kiefer Sutherland. (R, 100 min.) 

I Luv Video: CineSundays. Free. (*) @29th Street 
Ballroom, 8:30pm. 

0 Les Blank Retrospective: Part 2 Austin 
Music Film Festival. Several of the music-related 
films of great documentary maker Les Blank are 
featured in this two-night retrospective (Friday, 

Nov. 18, and Sunday, Nov. 20). This second program 
includes “Chulas Fronteras” (1976, 58 min.), a look 
at Flaco Jiminez, Lydia Mendoza, and other Norteno 
musicians; “Del Mero Corazon” (1979, 29 min.); 
and / Went to the Dance (1989, 84 min.), which 
focuses on numerous Cajun and zydeco greats. 
@Texas Spirit Theater, 6pm. 

Sex Freaks (1974) D: John Lamb. (NR, 79 min.) 
Smut City. This is an encyclopedic and explicit 
documentary about sexuality around the world. 
@New Movement Theater, 10:30pm. 

MONDAY 21 

The Big Lebowski Quote-Along (1998) 

(R, 117 min.) Action Pack. @Alamo Lamar, 10pm. 

1 Want My MTV D: Bill Be. (NR, 80 min.) Music 
Monday. Music videos, station promos, and Joe’s 
Apartment. @Alamo Ritz, 10:05pm. 

Kill All Redneck Pricks: KARP Lives! 1990- 
1998 (2010) D: William Badley. (NR, 89 min.) 

Music Monday. This documentary tells a story 
about three friends overcoming the odds through 
rock & roll. @Alamo Ritz, 7pm. 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 
Feast (2011) D: Bill Condon; with Kristen Stewart, 
Robert Pattinson, Taylor Lautner. (PG-13, 145 min.) 
Food & Film. See www.drafthouse.com for menu. 
@Alamo Lake Creek, 7pm. 


SPACES 

Real Genius (1985) D: Martha Coolidge; with Val 
Kilmer. (PG, 108 min.) Monday Movies Under the 

Stars. Free. @Butterfly Bar at the Vortex, 8pm. 


TUESDAY 22 

O The Awful Truth (1937) See p.70. 

Infra-Man (1975) D; Hua-Shan; with Li Hsiu-Hsien. 
(PG, 88 min.) Terror Tuesday. This Japanese mon- 
ster movie is an outrageously cheesy classic. (*) 
@Alamo Ritz, 10pm. 

The Sleeping Beauty (2011) NCM Fathom: 
Ballet in Cinema. @Arbor, Metropolitan, 6:30pm; 
@Southpark Meadows, Tinseltown North, Cinemark 
Stone Hill Town Center, Hill Country Galleria, CM 
Cedar Park, 6:30pm. (See Sunday.) 

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 
Feast (2011) Food & Film. @Alamo Lake Creek, 
Alamo Lamar, 7pm. (See Monday.) 


WEDNESDAY 23 

Blood Freak (1971) D: Steve Hawkes and Brad F. 
Grinter; with Hawkes, Grinter. (NR, 86 min.) Weird 
Wednesday. This is a perfect Thanksgiving film 
about a guy who becomes a marijuana addict and 
then gets a job at a poultry farm, where some 
pesticide-contaminated meat he eats turns him into 
a giant, bloodsucking turkey. @Alamo Ritz, 9:45pm. 


IMAX 

Born To Be Wild (2011) (G, 40 min.) Only 
screening in IMAX theatres, this 3-D film lov- 
ingly documents human intervention in the fate 
of orphaned orangutans and elephants. (*) Thu. 
(11/17), 11:30am, 1:30, 3:30pm; Fri.-Sat., 11am; 
Mon.-Wed., 11am. 

Happy Feet Two (2011) D: George Miller; with 
Elijah Wood, Robin Williams, Hank Azaria, Alecia 
“Pink” Moore, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon, Ava Acres, 

Sofia Vergara, Common, Hugo Weaving, Richard 
Carter , Anthony LaPaglia. (PG, 100 min.) See review 
on p.66. (*) Fri.-Wed., 1, 3, 5, 7, 9pm. 

Real Steel (2011) D: Shawn Levy; with Hugh 
Jackman, Dakota Goyo, Evangeline Lilly , Anthony 
Mackie, Kevin Durand, Hope Davis, James Rebhorn, 
Olga Fonda, Karl Yune. (PG-13, 127 min.) See review, 
p.70. (*) Thu. (11/17), 4:30, 7, 9:30pm. 

Texas: The Big Picture (2003) D. Scott Swofford; 
narrated by Colby Donaldson. (NR, 39 min.) Panoramic 
shots of Texas grace the screen as the state is 
shown to be a land capable of producing everything 
from grapefruit to microchips. Thu. (11/17), 9:30am; 
Fri.-Sat., 10am; Mon.-Wed., 10am. 

Tornado Alley (2011) D: Sean C. Casey. (NR, 43 min.) 
Storm Chasers star Casey joins the researchers of 
VORTEX 2 in this effort to capture the origins and 
evolution of tornadoes in 3-D. Thu. (11/17), 10:30am, 
12:30, 2:30pm; Sat., noon; Mon.-Wed., noon. 


OFFSCREEN 

501 Studios: Soundstage + HD Theatre 501 Studios’ soundstage in Downtown Austin doubles as a the- 
atre - with a Sony Qualia HD projector, a 28-foot screen, 180 (removable) seats, a vintage popcorn machine, and 
affordable rates. Need a venue for premieres, wrap parties, or concerts/ plays/ performances featuring projection? 
This could be the place. It’s also available as a soundstage or green screen. 485-3000. www.501studios.com. 

Association of Moving Image Archivists Conference The AMIA’s annual conference is its biggest and 
most important event, with a gathering of more than 600 archivists from all over the world. See website for a 
full slate of events. Through Nov. 19. Hyatt Regency Austin, 208 Barton Springs Rd., 477-1234. www.amianet.org. 

Austin School of Film Prime yourself for cinematic advancement with professional ASoF classes in 
all forms of digital media this fall: Sound Recording for Film and Video, Web Video and Viral Marketing, 
Advanced Final Cut Pro, Lighting 101, and many more. See website for details, www.austinfilmschool.org. 

Call for Entries: Faces of Austin Thu., Nov. 17. 974-9316. Free, www.austincreates.com. 

Cine Las Americas: Call for Entries Cine Las Americas International Film Festival is accepting submis- 
sions for its 15th annual incarnation in the ATX this coming April. They’re looking for films made by or about 
Latinos in the U.S. or the rest of the world and films by or about indigenous groups of the Americas. See 
website for details. Deadline: Jan. 16. www.cinelasamericas.org. 

Hill Country Film Festival Accepting Submissions The three-day independent film event held in 
Fredericksburg is now accepting submissions for its third annual festival in April 2012. Indie filmmakers from 
around the world can submit features, shorts, documentaries, animations, music videos, and 3-D shorts. See 
website for details. Early deadline: Dec. 2. Regular deadline: Feb. 2, 2012. www.hillcountryff.com. 

Screen It Like You Mean It Austin Studios has a state-of-the-art screening room, which is available to the 
public on a rental basis. Community and indie rates are available for the room, which sports an 18-foot-by- 
7-foot screen, 28 fixed theatre seats, and a surround-sound system and supports Super 35, 35mm, 16mm, 
VHS, and DVD formats. Accessible, restrooms - the works. It also has a break room suitable for presenta- 
tions, meetings, and general cinematic tomfoolery. 322-0145. www.austinstudios.org. 


The symbol (*) indicates full-length reviews available online: austinchronicle.com/film. 


72 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 






The IMAX Theatre at The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum 
Tickets and showtimes at TheStoryofTexas.com ★ (512) 936-4649 

Shows subject to sell out, change, or cancellation without notice. 



Prepare for a Zack Attack! 



MORNING NEWS WITH AN 

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NEWS 


The Chronicle’s Margaret Moser hooks you up with the hottest 
live music and CD releases on Good Day Austin every week. 


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ALL showings of Happy Feet Two and Puss in Boots BEFORE 7:00pm are ALL AGES! 

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 

PrttHtifriiAJLPCirtmi’ (PG-13) Fri. 10:00 1:004:00 7:00 10:00 12:01 
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J. EDGARftrtMsl m ELF Ci*cnj (R)Fri. - Thu. 12:50 4:05 7:15 10:25 

JACK AND JILL P ^nlrdm DIP Dnem#- (PG) Fri. - Thu. 
10:15 12:00 2:30 6:15 10:15 

TOWER HEIST Pit in W.P CrMrttr (PG-13) Fri. - 

Thu. 12:10 2:45 5:30 8:00 10:45 

IMMORTALS 3DP™i r d m QLF Drier*#' (R) Fri. - Thu. 
11:25 2:10 4:55 7:45 10:35 

HAPPY FEET TWO 3D* 1 -«rnlrd m DLF Drier*#' (PG) 

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PUSS IN BOOTS' 1 3LPCn FT1 B- (PG) Fri -Thu 

IMMORTALS 30 (R) DBox Motion SeatingFn. & Sat. 12:00 2:25 
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THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN PART 1 (PG-13) 

Fri. & Sat. 10:00 10:30 11:00 12:30 1:00 1:45 3:45 4:00 4:30 6:45 7:00 7:30 9:30 
10:0010:15 11:55 

Sun. - Thu. 10:00 10:30 11:00 12:30 1:00 1:45 3:45 4:00 4:30 6:45 7:00 7:30 9:30 
10:0010:15 

JACK AND JILL (PG) Fri. & Sat. 1 0:20 1 2:30 2:40 4:50 7:1 0 9:20 1 1 :30 

Sun. - Thu. 10:20 12:30 2:40 4:50 7:10 9:20 

J. EDGAR (R) Fri. -Thu. 10:10 1:00 4:10 7:15 10:10 

TOWER HEIST (PG-13) Fri. & Sat. 10:15 12:25 2:45 5:05 7:25 9:45 11:55 

Sun. - Thu. 10:15 12:25 2:45 5:05 7:25 9:45 

A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS(R) Fri & Sat 9:35 11:30 

Sun. - Thu. 9:35 

PUSS IN BOOTS 30 (PG) Fri. & Sat. 1 0:05 1 2:00 2:15 4:30 6:55 9:15 11 :20 
Sun. - Thu. 10:05 12:00 2:15 4:30 6:55 9:15 
HAPPY FEET TWO 3D (PG) Fri. & Sat. 10:00 11:30 12:15 2:10 2:30 
4:20 4:40 6:40 7:05 9:20 11:50 

Sun. - Thu. 10:00 11:30 12:15 2:10 2:30 4:20 4:40 6:40 7:05 9:20 


ft- - Special EnQinyii mn nti Ho P.ianei € -uu pum 
TickwlB .■ vanln bl-u un-lin-u CA.LAK VTH EATH E 5+ ca m 


12:15 2:40 5:05 7:30 9:45 


KIRSTEN 

DUNST 


CHARLOTTE 

GAINSBOURG 


ALEXANDER KEIFER 

SKARSGARD and SUTHERLAND 


‘A GIANT ACHIEVEMENT 

A WORK OF GENIUS. A MOVIE MASTERPIECE 

that leaves the viewer in a state of ecstasy” 

-Lisa Schwarzbaum, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY 



FESTIVAL DE CANNES 

BEST ACTRESS AWARD 

KIRSTEN 

DUNST 


‘A FILM THAT SWEEPS YOU UP 

AND TAKES YOU OUT OF YOURSELF. 

I COULD NOT HAVE BEEN HAPPIER.” 

-Joe Morgenstern, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL 

“ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST. 

A career-defining performance from Kirsten Dunst.” 

-Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES 

“AMAZINGLY ROMANTIC. 

LUSH, RIPE, RICH, DELICIOUS, CERTAINLY 
THE DIRECTOR’S MOST BEAUTIFUL FILM. 
EVERYTHING AND NOTHING THAT YOU'D 
EXPECT A FILM CALLED "MELANCHOLIA" TO BE. 

This is where you begin to see why Dunst is getting the 
i well-deserved raves for her performance, one that will no doubt 
earn her an Oscar nomination if not a win. ” 

-Betsy Sharkey, LA TIMES 

“Lars von Triers new spellbinder may be his most restrained, 
CLEAR-MINDED, VISIONARY WORK, AS WELL AS 

THE YEAR’S BEST FILM.” 

-Aaron Hillis, THE VILLAGE VOICE 


a FILM BY LARS VON TRIER 


MELANCHOLIA 

IT WILL CHANGE EVERYTHING. 


VA memos WA 


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austinchronkle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 73 









LISTINGS 


NOVEMBER 18-23 


EDITED BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ 


LIVE MUSIC VENUES P.78 • ROADSHOWS & CLUB LISTINGS P.80 

earache! Aretha Franklin and Young Nick at austinchronicle.com/earache. 



Paramount Theatre , Friday 18 

Jolie Holland opens. 


him, making better and better pop as they went. More 
than 16 years later, Olson’s back in the fold, with their 
just-released reunion disc in Mockingbird Time. 

Speaking with Gary Louris, the other half of the 
Minneapolis-based roots/pop combo’s distinctive 
harmonies, it’s apparent that while the band remains 
musically vital, circumstances surrounding it have 
changed. Like most acts today, that change came in 
the way it spends money, which led Louris to produce 
Mockingbird Time instead of hiring an outside producer. 

“They’re expensive,” he explains, “and it didn’t feel 

> like something we needed. I’ve produced the Sadies, 

* Tim Easton, Johnny Irion, and watched and learned from 
j some of the best. Everyone had their say in this record, 

> but I was the guy burning the midnight oil, getting the 
i overdubs done. It’s something I want to do more of.” 


While acknowledging that recording technology has 
changed greatly in the time between Jayhawks discs 
with Olson, Louris sees a more obvious change. 

“People don’t buy records anymore,” he asserts. “You 
used to tour to support your record. Now you make a 
record to support your tour. The days of spending three 
months in Los Angeles with an expensive producer are 
gone. There was also something about doing it in our 
hometown that felt good. The trick was getting a really 
good engineer and having a good studio, so the way the 
record sounds is something we can be proud of.” 

Austin is the second-to-last stop on the tour that 
began in August in the UK, so the band should be in 
peak form when it gets to town. Louris agrees. 

“We’re firing on all cylinders, so it’s kind of a shame 
that we have to stop.” - Jim Caligiuri 


The Jayhawks 


A decade into the band's career, founding member Mark 
Olson left the Jayhawks in 1995 and moved to Joshua Tree, 
Calif., with Victoria Williams. The band soldiered on without 


GWAR 

The Marchesa, Friday 18 

Blood brotherhood took on a 
whole new meaning for Richmond, 
Va., theatrical metal troupe 
Gwar following a performance in 
Minneapolis on Nov. 3, when lead 
guitarist Cory Smoot, 34, died 
aboard the band’s tour bus. His 
family in Circus Maximus blood- 
baths have now retired Flattus 
Maximus as a character, but 
every over-the-big-top red dye hos- 
ing now honors the group’s own 
dearly departed. New York hard- 
cores Every Time I Die and Phil 
Anselmo-sponsored Dallasites 
Warbeast stack the bill. 

- Raoul Hernandez 

RORY BLOCK 

Cactus Cafe , Friday 18 

Rory Block brings 62 years of 
veteran experience to her Delta 
country stylings. She’s won five 
W.C. Handy Awards, a soulful 
testament to her personal style, 
especially 
adept at 
parsing the 
unfettered 
sounds 
of Robert 
Johnson and 
Son House. 

Her recent 
Shake ’Em 
on Down: A 
Tribute to 
Mississippi 
Fred McDowell keeps all appli- 
cable genres alive and kicking. 

- Margaret Moser 



MERCY, MERCY, MERCY: 
AN 80TH BIRTHDAY 
CELEBRATION OF 
NAT ADDERLEY 

Momo’s, Friday 18 

“Dis Here” is the way to 
celebrate the memory of jazz 
legend Nat Adderley the month 
of what would have been his 
80th birthday: a full-blown party 
led by his soul-stirring local 
granddaughter Akina Adderley 
and her smokin’ band, the 
Vintage Playboys, featuring ATX 
keyboard wiz Eddy Hobizal and a 
set - spearheaded by trumpeter 
Erik Telford and saxman Elias 
Haslanger - that rejuvenates the 
tunes made famous by Nat and 
his brother, Julian “Cannonball” 
Adderley. It’s soul jazz time! 

- Jay Trachtenberg 


MELT-BANANA 

Mohawk , Saturdays 

Tokyo noise-punk threepiece 
Melt-Banana has been assault- 
ing Austin since its early-1990s 
inception, lead banshee Yasuko 
Onuki screaming herself blue at 
Liberty Lunch and Emo’s time 
and again over the ensuing 
decades. Outside at Mohawk 
alongside L.A. metalcore trio 
400 Blows, who christened 
Emo’s East by opening for the 
Butthole Surfers in September, 
the Japanese terrors approxi- 
mate the aural equivalent of 
one of their native ghost films. 
Brooklyn/Boston tribal weirdos 
Prince Rama and Houston psy- 
chics Indian Jewelry tag-team 
inside. - Raoul Hernandez 



CHUCK EDDY 

BookPeopie , Sunday 20 

Former Village Voice Music 
Editor Chuck Eddy clearly relishes 
the role of contrarian. The Austin 
resident’s new book, Rock and Roll 
Always Forgets (see “Phases & 
Stages,” Sept. 16), strikes its most 
potent notes in celebrating unhip 
sounds that most critics dismiss 
and in slashing at sacred cows. Few 
other Pazz & Joppers have much 


to say about so-called hair metal 
bands and hat acts, but Eddy’s 
incisive prose scolds knee-jerk elit- 
ism while begging second looks. 
Come to Sunday’s 5pm reading 
to find out if everything you know 
about music is wrong. - Greg Beets 

PETE ANDERSON 

Continental Club , Monday 21 

Best known as Dwight 
Yoakam’s sidekick, producer, and 
guitarist, Pete Anderson hasn’t 
occupied those positions in years. 
As a solo act, he still thrills guitar 
freaks whether getting twangy or, 
as he has of late, sidling up to 
the blues. Dale Watson’s ongoing 
Monday residence follows, made 
more interesting by the inclusion 
of the rough-and-rowdy hillbilly 
sounds of his fab new release, 

The Sun Sessions. - Jim Caligiuri 

THE LAST WALTZ’ 
REVISITED 

Momo’s, Wednesday 23 

Scorsese’s The Last Waltz 
opens with the instructions “This 
film should be played loud,” and 
in what’s become Thanksgiving 
tradition, Momo’s is happy to 
accommodate. Not only screen- 
ing the film (8pm), but also 
bringing the legendary 1976 
final blowout performance of the 
Band to life, Momo’s wrangles its 
regular roster of eclectic talent to 
re-create the scene (minus the 
copious cocaine). This year’s jam 
culls members from T Bird & the 
Breaks, Wisebird, Cowboy & Indian, 
and more, as well as Drew Smith 
and Boosy Cray. - Doug Freeman 



m-stores: Friday: Rick Broussard’s Two Hoots & a Holler, Cheapo Discs, 6pm; Deadly Breed, Swamp, Panhandle Tx, 
Trailer Space, 7pm; Tuesday: Naw Dude/Flesh Lights 7-inch release, Uh-Oh, Delizza, Trailer Space, 7pm 


soundcheck 

BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ 


HORSE + DONKEY 

Skinny’s Ballroom , 

Friday 18 

Local clang bang with 
Dim Locator, Larry Ohms, 
and Toppie Haynes. 

WHEELER BROTHERS 

Antone’s, Friday 18 

This freshman class 
band of heathens - best 
new local act? 

GHOSTLAND 

OBSERVATORY 

ACL Live at the Moody 
Theater ; Friday 18 & 
Saturday 19 

Falsetto laser glam 
still is available Friday; 
Saturday’s sold out. 

SWINGIN’ UTTERS 

Red 7, Saturday 19 
S.F. hillbilly punks per- 
form Here , Under Protest 
and possibly tribute their 
own tribute: Untitled 21: 

A Juvenile Tribute to the 
Swingin’ Utters. 

SECOND ANNUAL 
KEVIN FOWLER FFA/ 
4-H FUNDRAISER 

Broken Spoke , Saturday 19 
Dinner, silent auction, 
country throwdown, and 
Sam Bentley Band open- 
ing; 100% of proceeds 
benefit Travis and Hays 
County youth show proj- 
ects. $100. 


FU MANCHU 

Red 7, Sunday 20 
SoCal stoners fire up 
1996 ’s In Search Of ... 
supported by local heshers 
Honky and the Shrine. 

THE SONGS OF 
CHRIS WHITLEY 

Momo’s , Monday 21 
Sideshow Tragedian 
Nathan Singleton recalls 
the Texas bluesman, 
9:30pm. 

XIMENA SARINANA 

The Parish , Monday 21 
Guadalajaran ingenue 
returns with sophomore 
diary Ximena Sarihana. 

LZ LOVE 

Continental Club , Tuesday 22 
Soulful blues shake. 

BLACK RED BLACK 

The HighBall , 

Wednesday 23 

Red-hot organ trio’s 
weekly residency goes live 
on KUT 90.5FM (2pm), 
then gets preserved here 
by local filmmaker Scott 
Hathaway. Free, 10pm. 

SLAID CLEAVES 

Saxon Pub , Wednesday 23 
Master song craftsman’s 
2-CD Sorrow & Smoke: Live 
at the Horseshoe Lounge 
is transplanted round the 
corner at the Saxon. 


74 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







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DEREK WINTERS 


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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 75 









VO 



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76 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 







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austinchronkle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 77 























78 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


LIVE MUSIC VENUES 


ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER, 310 W. Willie Nelson Blvd., 
225-7999 

AMAYA’S TACO VILLAGE, 5804 S. 1-35, 458-2531 
ANDERSON MILL TAVERN, 10401 Anderson Mill, 918-1599 
ANGEL’S ICEHOUSE, 21815 Hwy. 71 W., Spicewood, 
512/264-3777 

ANTONE’S, 213 W. Fifth, 320-8424 
ARTZ RIB HOUSE, 2330 S. Lamar, 442-8283 

AZUL TEQUILA MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 4211 S. Lamar, 
416-9667 

BACKROADS AUSTIN, 2200 1-35 S., 448-9711 
BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL, 3003 S. Lamar, 691-9140 
BAR 141, 141 E. Hopkins St., San Marcos, 512/558-7399 
BAT BAR, 218 E. Sixth, 474-6363 
BB ROVERS, 12636 Research Ste. B-101, 335-9504 

B. D. RILEY’S IRISH PUB, 204 E. Sixth, 494-1335 
BEAUTY BAR, 617 E. Seventh, 391-1943 
BEERLAND, 711 Red River, 479-ROCK 

BLUE MOON ROCK & BLUES BAR, 422 E. Sixth, 476-1077 

BOOKPEOPLE, 603 N. Lamar, 472-5050 

’BOUT TIME, 9601 N. 1-35, 832-5339 

BROKEN SPOKE, 3201 S. Lamar, 442-6189 

THE BROWN BAR, 201 W. Eighth, 480-8330 

C. HUNTS ICE HOUSE, 9611 McNeil Rd., 836-0558 
CACTUS CAFE, Texas Union, UT campus, 475-6515 
CAFE MUNDI, 801 Tillery 

CAROUSEL LOUNGE, 1110 E. 52nd, 452-6790 
CEDAR STREET, 208 W. Fourth, 495-9669 
CENTRAL MARKET NORTH, 4001 N. Lamar, 206-1000 
CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH, 4477 S. Lamar, 899-4300 
CHEAPO DISCS, 914 N. Lamar, 477-4499 
CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE, 119 Cheatham St., 

San Marcos, 512/353-3777 
CHEER UP CHARLIE’S, 1104 E. Sixth, 431-2133 
CHERRYWOOD COFFEEHOUSE, 1400 E. 38V 2 , 538-1991 
CHEZ ZEE, 5406 Balcones, 454-2666 
CHUGGIN’ MONKEY, 219 E. Sixth, 476-5015 
CONANS PIZZA, 2018 W. Stassney, 441-6754 
CONTINENTAL CLUB, 1315 S. Congress, 441-2444 
COTTON CLUB, 212 E. Davilla St., Granger, 512/859-0700 
DIZZY ROOSTER, 306 E. Sixth, 236-1667 
DONN’S DEPOT, 1600 W. Fifth, 478-0336 
DOWN UNDER DELI, 21209 Hwy. 71 W., Spicewood, 
512/264-8000 

THE DRISKILL HOTEL, 604 Brazos, 474-5911 

EAST SIDE DESIGN, 1806 Willow 
EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE, 301 E. Fifth, 472-1860 
EL SOL Y LA LUNA, 600 E. Sixth, 444-7770 
ELEPHANT ROOM, 315 Congress, 473-2279 
ELYSIUM, 705 Red River, 478-2979 
EMO’S EAST, 2015 Riverside, 474-5370 
EMO’S, 603 Red River, 505-8541 
ESQUINATANGO, 209 Pedernales, 524-2772 
EVANGELINE CAFE, 8106 Brodie, 28-CAJUN 
FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 214 W. Fourth, 457-0172 
FAIR BEAN COFFEE, 2210-1 S. First, 444-BEAN 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF AUSTIN, 901 Trinity, 476 2625 
FLAMINGO CANTINA, 515 E. Sixth, 494-9336 
FLIPNOTICS COFFEESPACE, 1601 Barton Springs Rd., 
480-8646 

FRANK, 407 Colorado, 494-6916 
FREDDIE’S PLACE, 1703 S. First, 445-9197 
G&S LOUNGE, 2420 S. First, 707-8702 
GIDDY UPS, 12010 Manchaca Rd., 280-4732 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON, 5434 Burnet Rd., 
458-1813 

GREEN PASTURES RESTAURANT, 811 W. Live Oak, 
444-4747 

GRUENE HALL, 1281 Gruene Rd., New Braunfels, 
830/606-1281, 830/629-5077 
GUERO’S TACO BAR, 1412 S. Congress, 447-7688 
HALCYON, 218 W. Fourth, 472-9637 
HEADHUNTERS, 720 Red River, 236-0188 
THE HIGHBALL, 1142 S. Lamar, 383-8309 
HILL’S CAFE, 4700 S. Congress, 851-9300 
HOLE IN THE WALL, 2538 Guadalupe, 302-1470 
HOTEL VEGAS, 1500 E. Sixth, 589-1411 
HOUSE WINE, 408 Josephine, 322-5210 
HYDE PARK BAR & GRILL, 4521 West Gate Blvd., 899-2700 
INTERCONTINENTAL STEPHEN F. AUSTIN, 701 Congress, 
457-8800 

JOVITA’S, 1619 S. First, 447-7825 

KICK BUTT COFFEE AT THE TRIANGLE, 4600 Guadalupe, 
467-1 DOL 

KICK BUTT COFFEE, 5775 Airport #725, 454-5425 
LA FERIA RESTAURANT, 2010 S. Lamar, 326-8301 
LA PALAPA, 6640 Hwy. 290 E„ 459-8729 
LAMBERTS, 401 W. Second, 494-1500 
LAS PALOMAS, 3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122, 327-9889 


LATITUDE 30, 512 San Jacinto, 472-3335 
LUCKY LOUNGE, 209-A W. Fifth, 479-7700 

LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS BAR & RESTAURANT, 

506 West, 236-0083 
MAGGIE MAE’S, 323 E. Sixth, 478-8541 
MALAIA WORLD LOUNGE, 300 E. Sixth, 762-2000 

MANGIA CHICAGO STUFFED PIZZA, 8012 Mesa, 349 2126 
THE MARCHESA HALL & THEATRE, 6406 N. 135 #3100, 
454-2000 

MARIA MARIA, 415 Colorado, 687-6800 
MARIA’S TACO XPRESS, 2529 S. Lamar, 444-0261 
MEAN-EYED CAT, 1621 W. Fifth, 472-6326 

MISTER TRAMPS SPORTS PUB & CAFE, 8565 Research, 
837-3500 

MOHAWK, 912 Red River, 482-8404 

MOJOE ROOM BAR & GRILL, 6405 N. 1-35 #1600, 206-4110 
MOMO’S, 618 W. Sixth #200, 479-8848 

MOZART’S COFFEE ROASTERS, 3825 Lake Austin Blvd., 
477-2900 

MUGSHOTS, 407 E. Seventh, 236-0008 
NASTY’S, 606 Maiden, 453-4349 
ND AT 501 STUDIOS, 501 N. 1-35, 485-3001 
NEWORLDELI, 4101 Guadalupe, 451-7170 

NORTH BY NORTHWEST RESTAURANT & BREWERY, 

10010 Capital of TX Hwy. N., 467-6969 
NUTTY BROWN CAFE, 12225 Hwy. 290 W„ 301-4648 
THE OASIS, 6550 Comanche Trail, 266-2442 
ONE 2 ONE BAR, 121 E. Fifth, 473-0121 

ORUN CENTER OF CULTURAL ARTS, 1401 B Cedar, 
294-7872 

PAPI TINO’S, 1306 E. Sixth, 479-1306 
PARAMOUNT THEATRE, 713 Congress, 472-5470 
THE PARISH, 214 E. Sixth, 473-8381 
PATSY’S CAFE, 5001 E. Ben White, 444-2020 
PLUSH, 617 Red River, 478-0099 
POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE, 22308 Hwy. 71 W., 
Spicewood, 512/264-0318 
POODLE DOG LOUNGE, 6507 Burnet Rd., 465-9468 
REALE’S PIZZA & CAFE, 13450 Hwy. 183 N„ 335-5115 
RED 7, 611 E. Seventh, 476-8100 
RED EYED FLY, 715 Red River, 474-1084 
THE RED ROOSTER, 109 E. Pecan St., Pflugerville, 251-4129 
RED SHED TAVERN, 8504 S. Congress, 280-4899 
REPUBLIC LIVE, 301 W. Fifth, 480-9888 
RILEY’S TAVERN, 8894 FM 1102, Hunter, 512/392-3132 
ROADHOUSE, 1103 Wonder St., Round Rock, 512/218-0813 
RUTA MAYA, 3601 S. Congress Ste. D-200, 707-9637 
RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE, 107 W. Sixth, 477-7884 
THE SAHARA LOUNGE, 1413 Webberville Rd., 927-0700 
SAM’S TOWN POINT, 2115 Allred, 282-0083 
SAN GABRIEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 5404 Williams, 
869-4884 

SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR, 5900 Slaughter #400, 288-9994 
SAXON PUB, 1320 S. Lamar, 448-2552 
THE SCOOT INN, 1308 E. Fourth, 478-6200 

SFC FARMERS’ MARKET AT SUNSET VALLEY, 3200 Jones, 
236-0074 

SFC FARMERS’ MARKET DOWNTOWN, Fourth & Guadalupe, 
236-0074 

SHENANIGANS, 13233 Pond Springs Rd., 258-9717 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL, 9012 Research 
Ste. C-l, 380-9443 

SHOOTERS BILLIARDS NORTH, 11416 RR 620 N„ 401-2060 
SHOOTERS BILLIARDS, 601 E. Whitestone Blvd., Cedar Park, 
512/260-2060 

SKINNY’S BALLROOM, 115 San Jacinto, 476-1962 
SPEAKEASY, 412 Congress, 476-8017 

ST. DAVID’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 301 E. Eighth, 610-3500 
STARDUST CLUB, 11940 Manchaca Rd., 280-8590 
STUBB’S, 801 Red River, 480-8341 

SULLIVAN’S STEAKHOUSE, 300 Colorado #200, 495-6504 

TARRYTOWN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 

2601 Exposition, 472-3111 
TEXAS BAR & GRILL, 14611 Burnet Rd., 255-1300 
TEXAS MIST, 1115 Bastrop Hwy., 385-3553 
THREADGILL’S WORLD HQ, 301 W. Riverside, 472-9304 
III FORKS, 111 Lavaca, 474-1776 

TRAILER SPACE RECORDS, 1401-A Rosewood, 524-1445 
TRIPLE CROWN, 206 N. Edward Gary St., San Marcos, 
512/396-2236 

TROPHY’S, 2008 S. Congress, 447-0969 
VICTORY GRILL, 1104 E. 11th, 291-6211 
VOLSTEAD LOUNGE, 1500 E. Sixth, 680-0532 

THE WATER-HOLE SALOON, 5244 Hwy. 71 E., Del Valle, 
512/247-5119 

WATERLOO ICE HOUSE, 1106 W. 38th, 451-5245 
WATERLOO ICE HOUSE, 9600 Escarpment Blvd., 301-1007 
WHIP IN, 1950 S. 1-35, 442-5337 
WHITE SWAN LOUNGE, 1906 E. 12th, 524-5702 
Z’TEJAS, 1110 W. Sixth, 478-5355 





private party as our parking lot transforms 
into a tented & climate controlled venue that's 
connected to the inside of the bar. 

Known as the foul-mouthed wedding singer in 
the movie Old School, Dan Bard performed their 
now-infamous rendition of Total Eclipse of the Heart, 
as well as appeared as the sleazy bat-mitzvah 
singer in Starsky & Hutch, and most recently 
in the film The Hangover. 

2 FULL BARS • HORS D’OEUVRES • PARTY FAVORS 
CHAMPAGNE BAR * PHOTO BOOTH * DOORS @ 8PM 


12 . 31.11 


: F E AT U R I N G : 


neiliyo 


DJ KENJA 


PICKETS: 

KUNGFUSALOON.COM/2Q12 

FOR MORE INFO 
512.632.4979 
NYE@KUNGFUSALOON.COM 


KUNG FU SALOON 

PRESENTS 

NEW YEAR’S EVE 

WITH ^ 


Join us for an 

ALL INCLUSIVE 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 79 





ALL AGES VENUE ® ROADSHOW O RECOMMENDED j) HEAR MUSIC ONLINE 




Leave the Show to the Band. Please Enjoy Responsibly. ™ sum* 1 * 1 y 
Jack Daniel’s TN Whiskey, Alcohol 40% by Volume. Lynchburg, TN. 


All dates, acts, ticket prices subject to change w/o notice. All tickets subject to applicable service charges. % at&t < 


AUSTIN CITY LIMITS LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER 


Tickets & info: acl-live.com - Waterloo Records - 877 435 9849 




TOMORRO 


FRI, NOV 18 



anderson mill tavern Blaze Bayley 

antone’S Tyler Bryant & the 
Shakedown (9:00) ®© 

BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL Justif © 

beauty bar Real Book Fake Book, 
Best Fwends (9:00) 

beerland Crooked Bangs, the 
Creamers, OBN Ill’s, Culture 
Kids (9:00) © 

broken spoke Tony Harrison, 
Dance Lessons, Jesse Dayton J> 
( 6 : 00 ) 

c. hunts ice house Two Stones 
One Bird (6:30) 

cactus cafe Milkdrive (8:30) © 

carousel lounge Johanna 
Heilman, Madisons (7:00) 

central market north Blackbird 3 
(6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE John 
David Kent 

cheer up Charlie’s KOOP Benefit 
w/ Beth Israel, Floating 
Holidays, Rings Band, Kay 
Leotard, St. James Society 

continental club Gallery: The 
Peterson Bros., Tameca Jones 
(8:30); In the Club: Planet 
Casper (6:30); Latin at Hearth, 
Dahebegebees (10:00) 

donn’S depot Murphy’s Inlaws 


the driskill hotel Driskill Bar: 
Melissa Carper & Joe Sundell 
(7:00) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Scotty 
B. Trio (8:00) © 

elephant room Albanie & Her 
Fellas (6:00); Tony Airoldi, 
Three Jazz Collective (6:00) 

ELYSIUM 90 ’s Night 

emo’S Fire From the Gods, Harm’s 
Way, Stray From the Path, 
Terror, the Acacia Strain (7:00) 

©© 

FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 

Patrick Fleming (9:00) 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF AUSTIN 

Conspirare Sing-Along w/ Craig 
Hella Johnson (6:00) 

FLAMINGO CANTINA Subkulture 
Patriots, Dead Marching Band, 
NUF (9:00) 

flipnotics coffeespace Open Mic 
w/ Lisa Kettyle (8:00) © 

frank Chase GassawayJ*, Jordan 
Whitmore (9:30) © 

Freddie’s place Dewayne Davis J> 
( 6 : 00 ) © 

g&s lounge Cintus Supremus, 
Kidoo (9:30) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Alvin Crow (9:00) 
gruene hall The Jayhawks w/ 
Jolie Holland (8:00) ©© 


guero’s taco bar Matt Smith’s 
World (6:30) 

the highball Dale Watson (8:00) 

hole in the wall SuperLiteBike, 
the Baker Family, Auroravore 
( 10 : 00 ) 

hotel vegas Politics (10:00) 

house wine A.J. Vincent (7:00) 

INTERCONTINENTAL STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 

Devin Preitauer 

kick butt coffee Open Mic (8:00) 

© 

la feria restaurant Mariachi 
Relampago (7:00) © 

la palapa Johnny Gonzales (7:00) 

Lamberts Masumi & the 
Gentlemen (7:30) 

lucky lounge Ian McLagan & the 
Bump Band (6:00), Wounded 
CityJ> (10:00) 

maria’s taco xpress Dave Insley’s 
Careless Smokers (7:00) © 

mean-eyed cat La TampiquenaJ* 
( 8 : 00 ) 

mohawk The American Spirit 
(5:00); Michael Booher, My 
Jerusalem (10:00) 

momo’s Tate Mayeux & 

Broussard, Donny Jones, 

Pablo Black, Significant 
Others, Nick Ginbey 

neworldeli Amanda PearcyJ> 


ROAD SHOWS 


November 

THU 17 

Tyler Bryant & the 
Shakedown, Antone’s 
Culture Kids, Crooked Bangs, 

Beerland 

The Acacia Strain, Terror, 
Stray From the Path, Emo’s 
Jolie Holland, the Jayhawks, 

Gruene Hall 

Holy Ghost!, Eli Escobar, 
Jessica 6, the Parish 
Rebirth Brass Band, Stubb s 
Scott Dettra, Tarrytown United 
Methodist Church 
Dead Dog, Church Shoes, 
Trailer Space Records 

FRI 18 

The Reen, Backroads Austin 

The Watermarks, Beauty Bar 
Rory Block, Cactus Cafe 

Pterodactyl, Emo’s 
Senses Fail, Stick to Your 
Guns, Make Do & Mend, the 
Story So Far, Emo’s East 
Awesome Death, Headhunters 
Fierce Bad Rabbit, Hole in the 
Wall 

Hot Sauce, Lucy’s Retired 
Surfers Bar & Restaurant 


Gwar, Every Time I Die, 
Warbeast, the Marchesa Hall 
& Theatre 

The Jayhawks, Jolie Holland, 

Paramount Theatre 

One Red Martian, Red Eyed Fly 
The Haymakers, the Red 

Rooster 

Dim Locator, Skinny’s Ballroom 
Swamp, Trailer Space Records 

The Penny Dreadfuls, Triple 
Crown 

Vex, Trophy’s 

SAT 19 

Lost Bayou Ramblers, 

Continental Club 

Between the Buried & 

Me, Animals as Leaders, 
Tesseract, Emo’s East 
Bamako Airlines, 

EsquinaTango 

The Suite Unraveling, Frank 
Gentlemen Rogues, Hole in 
the Wall 

Melt-Banana, 400 Blows, 
Prince Rama, Indian Jewelry, 
Blackie, Mohawk 
Fierce Bad Rabbit, Momo’s 
The Vagues, DJ Johnny 
Sleeper, Nasty’s 
Swingin’ Utters, Far From 
Finished, Red 7 
Zest of Yore, Skinny’s Ballroom 


Steve Aoki, Hank & Cupcakes, 

Stubb’s 

The Wrong Ones, White Swan 
Lounge 

SUN 20 

The Bled, Emo’s 
Pete Anderson, Gruene Hall 
Starlings, TN, Momo’s 
Fu Manchu, Red 7 

MON 21 

Pete Anderson, Continental Club 

Boy, Shivery Shakes, Mohawk 
Ximena Sarinana, Avalanche 
City, the Parish 

TUE 22 

Elway, Special Guest, Dahling, 

Beerland 

Encore, Cedar Street 

Seth Sherman, Flipnotics 
Coffeespace 

Supervillains, G&S Lounge 
Future Islands, Ed Schrader’s 
Music Beat, Mohawk 
Neverwas, Red 7 

WED 23 

King Khan & the Shrines, 

Carousel Lounge 
Hymn for Her, Hole in the Wall 

Emily Herring, Triple Crown 


LISTINGS ARE FREE AND PRINTED ON A SPACE AVAILABLE BASIS. ACTS ARE LISTED CHRONOLOGICALLY. SCHEDULES ARE SUBJECT TO 
CHANGE, SO CALL CLUBS TO CONFIRM LINEUPS. START TIMES ARE PROVIDED WHERE KNOWN AND ARE PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. 

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS: MUSIC LISTINGS DEADLINE IS MONDAY MORNINGS, 9AM, FOR THAT WEEK’S ISSUE, PUBLISHED ON 
THURSDAY PLEASE INDICATE ROADSHOWS AND RESIDENCIES. SEND VENUE NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE NUMBER, ACTS, AND START TIMES 


TO: CLUB LISTINGS, PO BOX 49066, AUSTIN, TX 78765; FAX, 458-6910; PHONE, 454-5766 X159; EMAIL, clubs@austinchronicle.com. 

AUSTIN BANDS: WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU. IF YOU HAVEN’T REGISTERED AND UPLOADED YOUR MP3S TO THE MUSICIANS 
REGISTER, GO TO AUSTINCHRONICLE.COM/REGISTER. ANYWHERE YOUR BAND IS MENTIONED, YOUR MUSIC WILL BE FEATURED. 


80 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 








JANUARY 13 • 8 PM 

Proceeds benefit 

MARATHON KIDS 

Tickets on sale November 1 8 

at austintheatre.org 

Paramount Theatre Box Office 

512-474-1221 

more info at 

marathonkids.org 


SHAWN COLVIN 
a LYLE LOVETT 
TOGETHER 
ONSTAGE ^ 
MARATHON KIDS 

LIVE 

PARAMOUNT 


•f HHE ADGJ m 

dang. 


SOUTH ON RIVERSIDE 

Gospel Silvertones 

no cover 

sun Bells of Joy nam 

Nov. 27 1 


THE BACKROOM PRESENTS 


idit 


NORTH ON LAMAR 


Sun 
Nov. 20 


Wed 
Nov. 23 


Fri 

Nov. 25 


AirCargo 


llam 


no cover 


Brennen Leigh & 
Noel McKayypm 


SESSIONS w 

Threadgill’s South on Riverside 
Hosted by: Jessie Scott (All Shows Indoor) 

Sun lUncoln Durham 

No v. 20 

$10 


Mon Joss Klein 8 pm 

Nov. 21 

$10 


Jon Dee Graham 8 pm 


no cover 


BettySoo 



9 pm 


$10 


Coming ||/27 -Adam 11/28 -Shelley 11/29 -Ryan 

Soon... Hood King Beaver 


BJg?0 

0! 


TWO LOCATIONS 
3 Venues 


South - world Headqts. 
301 W. RIVERSIDE 
512-472-9304 


North - Old No. 1 
6416 NORTH LAMAR 
512-451-5440 


THREADGILLS.COM 


Romeo’s 



7:30 BIG DL BAND 

9:30 GH OSTS ALONG TH E BRAZOS 

FRIDAY NIGHT SUPPER CLUB 
7:3D SABROSDN 
B:3D TH E SHADY RES T BAND 

SATURDAY NIGHT SHOWCASE 
7:3D HDT TEXAS SWING BAND 
ID JE SSICA SHEPHE RD 

7:3D MA RSHALL HDDD S THE BADS 

7 LISA KETTYLE DPEN MIC 
9 JIMMY PRESTDN 
CAVALCADE BF CDMEDY 

GRL5 NIGHT (XT HAPPY HOUR 
EVERY WEDNESDAY 3 -11 

8:3D MARIAH YJ 

* ^ ^ 

thanksgiving Dinnen 

Music & Football 

DEEP FRIED TURKEY DINNER 
S13.95 +tax 
MAKE YDUR RESERVATIONS NOW 

512 - 476 - 109 ! 

ToGo 

WHOLE FRIED 
TURKEY DINNER' 
with trimmings 
serves 8 -ID 

$119.99 +tax 



cactus cafe 


EST. 197 B 





BLOCK 

t I 



SAT NOV 19 


KEVIN 
WELCH 

WITH 

DUSTIN WELCH 

WI MI = ITTiW S3l 
[Mil 171 





DAVID HIDALGO 
& MABC BIDOT 

WED j ^ 

NOV 30 , x 


TOM 
RUSSEHO 



TICKETS FOR UPCOMING SHOWS NOW ON SALE AT: 

www.cactuscafe.org 


it VOTED #1 ACOUSTIC MUSIC VENUE 2001-2010! it 


COMING TO A CAFE NEAR YOU 


*1 2/1 ALVSSA GRAHAM *1 2/2 RAYLAND RANTER 
*1 2/3 SLAID CLEAVES *12/7 THE TRISHAS 
*1 2/8 RETTY SOO & DOUG COX *1 2/9 ELLIS PAUL 
*12/10 MATT THE ELECTRICIAN 


The Cactus is located inside the Texas Union Building. 

Happy Hour 4-7pm, Monday-Friday. brought to you by 
All shows @ 8:30pm unless noted. 
www.utexas.edu/universityunions -hi 1 1 hut 


23rd & Guadalupe 
475-6515 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 81 












CLUB LISTINGS 




11/17 BAKER FAMitf. SUPER LITE BIKE, special 
gUiils, S3 11/18 GLGBSTER, CHILI COLD 
BLOOD. FIERCE BAD RABBIT vox VULTURE S 
m 11/19 BLACK BOOKS. MAGNET SCHOOL, 
CARVER. VO VO KAKURA. 9PM. $3 1V20UJKE 
and THE LEAD HEAVY. TREY BROWN, CHRISTY 
HAYS 10PM 11/21 LEO RONDEAU, MIKE and 
the MOONPIES. 10PM, $3 11/22 CLYDE end 
CLEM'S WHISKEY BUSINESS and friends. 10pm 
11/23 HYMN FOR HER. MAGNETAR, 11/2* 
HITW THANKSGIVING w/ super delicious special 
guwttW 


j Mobile? So are we. 

| Take us with you. 

D Events • Restaurants 

5 Best of Austin Winners 

m austinchronicle.com/m 




THU NOV 17 


B 


WALLER CREEK AMPH THEATER 


SAT FEB 18 


SAT NOV 19 


mam i 


REBIRTH BRASS BAND 


G OSPEL BHU N CE 


WESLEY BRAY & THE DISCIPLES OF JOY 


CALL 512.480.8341 x4 FOR RESERVATIONS 






DEADEYE GRATEFUL DEAD TRIBUTE BAND 


GOBI FREE SHOW INSIDE AFTER STEVE AOKI 


■ HANK & CUPCAKES 


VAGABOND COLLECTIVE PRESENTS 

THEROCKETBOYS 

WITH THE WINTER SOUNDS 
WILD MOCCASINS AND LITTLE LO 


special guest BEN RECTOR 


WED JAN 25 SAT MAR 3 


.M.kbfcna 


DIMITRI'S RAIL 

"To. g? il : .:,i 


+ I 


E38 


HE'S MY BROTHER, SHE'S MY SISTER 

WITH THE SWEET NUTHIN' 




THE DEVIL MAKES THREE 




WIIHBROWN BIRD 


MYNAMEISJOHNMICHAEL 

E33 




BOY 


WILL HOGE 

WITH JOSH HOGE AND REED TURNER 

i i"i ■ 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ii il i m 

■ 101X INDEPENDENT WORKFORCE XMAS WITH 

SPEAK, UME 

and SOLIDER THREAD 

INSIDE AFTER CAKE *MUST HAVE TICKET FROM CAKE 


» INSIDE 
SHOW 


> OUTSIDE 
SHOW 


19-1(1- DAVID RAMIREZ 

IL lu W/HIS BAND WITH WILD CHILD 


19-19- HURT 

1 L lu THE ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE 




Grouplowe 


9- * GRIEVES &BUDO 

,L IJ W/K.FLAY AND THE BREAKLITES 


1-97* MUTEMATH fflfi 


TICKETS AVAILABLE AT STUBB’S 
<2* O 3 CO NCERTS.COM 


82 theaustin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


FROM THURSDAY 


NORTH BY NORTHWEST RESTAURANT & 

brewery Liz Morphis © 

one 2 one bar Candiland, Natalie 
ZoeJ) (9:00) 

papi tino’S Kane West Organ Trio 
(7:30) 

the parish Jessica 6, Eli Escobar, 
Holy Ghost! (9:00) ® 

plush Chris Costello, Josh 
Dupont, Daniel Allen (10:00) 

poodie’s hilltop roadhouse Union 
Specific, Meagan Tubb (9:30) 

© 

red eyed fly Vanagen, Laute 
Leute, Little Saigon J>, Sciborg 
& the Robopimps, State of the 
Art, the Scarlett Effect 

the red rooster Rockin’ Steve 

riley’S tavern Firewater Sermon 
(9:00) 

roadhouse Mojo Jam 

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE Jeff 
Lofton (7:00) 

the Sahara lounge Adrian 
Quesada, DJ Chicken George 

SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR T. Jarrod 
Bonta (6:30) 

saxon pub Eightysixxed (6:00); 
Johnny Nicholas, Bus Stop 
Stallions, Jordan Mitchell 
( 8 : 00 ) 

the scoot inn Jaimee HarrisJ> 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

Shinola 

skinny’s ballroom Ugly Numbers, 
Bee vs. MothJ>, Plutonium 
Farmers, Muchos Backflips! 

speakeasy Big Max Band (10:00) 
stubb’S Rebirth Brass Band O® 

SULLIVAN’S STEAKHOUSE Matt 
Wilson BandJ> (7:30) 

TARRYTOWN UNITED METHODIST 

church Scott Dettra (7:30) ® 

Texas mist Big Money, Don 

Turnley’s Shotgun House (8:00) 

TRAILER SPACE RECORDS Church 
Shoes, Dead Dog, Followed by 
Static J> (7:00) ®© 

triple crown Erickson (6:00), 
Orquesta Ritmo (9:00) 

trophy’s El Commode, Scary 
Mondelos, Wildcat (9:00) 

VOLSTEAD LOUNGE The Shake (10:00) 
Z’TEJAS Kris Kimura (6:00) 


ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER 

Ghostland Observatory (8:00) 

amaya’S taco village Johnny 
Gonzales (5:00) 

ANDERSON MILL TAVERN Melodic 
Drifters 

artz rib house The Studebakers 
(7:30) © 


AZUL TEQUILA MEXICAN RESTAURANT 

Mariachi Relampago (8:00) © 

backroads Austin The ReenJ> 

(9:00) © 

BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL Pong © 

beauty bar Boy + Kite, the 
Watermarks, Motel Aviv (9:00) 

© 

beerland Queen Street, Recide, 
Black Gum, Cruddy (9:00) 

’bout time DJ Element 
cactus cafe Rory Block (8:30) 

®© 

carousel lounge Senayit, Jake 
Levinson, Bellfuries (7:00) 

cedar street Trent Durham (6:00) 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Rattletree 
Marimba (6:30) © 

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Tony 
Harrison (6:30) © 

cheapo discs Rick Broussard’s 
Two Hoots & a Holler (6:00) 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Slaid 

Cleaves (9:00) 

cheer up Charlie’s Daze of Heaven, 
Slugbug, Enantiodromia, Youthful 
Masturbation Techniques, Bali 
YaaahJ* 

CHERRYWOOD COFFEEHOUSE Ryan 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

chuggin’ monkey Guilty Pleasures 
(9:00) 

conans pizza Matt “Blue Cat” 
Ferre I (6:30) © 



continental club Gallery: Robert 
Kraft Trio; Mike Flanigin 
Trio w/ Frosty (8:30); In the 
Club: The Blues Specialists 
(6:30), Patricia Vonne, Rick 
Broussard’s Two Hoots & a 
Holler CD Release (10:00) 

donn’S depot Donn & the Station 
Masters 

the driskill hotel Driskill Bar: 
Quenby (6:00), Brennen Leigh 
(9:00) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Lucky 
Strikes (8:00) © 
el sol y la luna Mariachi 
Tamazula (8:00) © 

elephant room The Jitterbug 
Vipers (6:00), Beto y Los 
Fairlanes (9:30) 

elysium Glambilly, Tex & the Texas 
Horseheads, Convoi!J>, Johnny 
Hootrock (9:30) 

emo’S Marriage, Daniel Francis 
Doyle, Pterodactyl (10:00) ®© 

emo’S east The Story So Far, Make 
Do & Mend, Stick to Your Guns, 
Senses Fail (8:00) © 

FAIR BEAN COFFEE Open MiC W/ 

Amy Zamarripa (5:00) 

flamingo cantina Jah Karma, 

Jah Mighty, McPullish, Nappy 
Riddem (9:00) 

FLIPNOTICS COFFEESPACE Wild Bill 
& the Lost Knobs (6:00); Tom 
Meny, Ray Prim (8:00) © 

Freddie’s place Pete Minda (6:00) 

© 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Dane Sterling, Scott Angle & 
the Cold Cold Hearts (6:00) 

gruene hall Turnpike Troubadours, 
Jason Boland & the Stragglers 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

guero’S taco bar Los Flames 
(6:30) 

headhunters Bipolar Gentlemen, 
Attic Ted, Prodeus, Awesome 
DeathJ), Bipolar Gentlemen, 
Attic Ted © 

hill’s cafe Andrea Marie & the 
Magnolia Band © 

HOLE IN THE WALL Vultures Kit, 
Fierce Bad Rabbit, Chili Cold 
Blood, Globster (9:00) © 

INTERCONTINENTAL STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 

Danielle Reich (5:30) 

Lamberts Nano Whitman & 

Brother of Pearl (10:30) 

latitude 30 Los Jefes (5:30) 

lucky lounge Type A (9:00) 

LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS BAR & 

restaurant Hot Sauce (9:00) 

© 

THE MARCHESA HALL & THEATRE 

Warbeast, Every Time I Die, 
Gwar ® 

maria’s taco xpress Leeann 
Atherton (7:00) © 

MEAN-EYED CAT Todd Phelps & 
Southern Comfort (9:00) 


ALL AGES VENUE 


ROADSHOW 


o RECOMMENDED j) 


HEAR MUSIC ONLINE 



% and radio station ^ 

115 San Jacinto Blvd. skinnysballroom.com 

Check our calendar for more ~ music trivia • karaoke • open mic 


Thur 1 1/17 • Muchos Backflips, 
Plutonium Farmers, Bee vs. 
Moth, The Ugly Numbers 
Fri 1 1/18 • Horse + Donkey, 
Dim Locator, Larry Ohms, Toppie 
Haynes 

Sat 11/1 9 -Scan Hopper CD 
release w/ My Education, The 
Gary, Zest of Yore 
7i/es77/22*(7-9pm) Bob 
Hoffnar and $2 craft beer pints! 














T 





BRIAN SETZER'S ROCKABILLY RIOT 

SHT DEC IB 



W SHQyRS* RRPFAND 
SDESMDW TRAMPS 

HW SOT DEC 31 




GET YOU 3 TICKETS NOW THROUGH 

C3CONCERTS.COM 


Saxonpub 

l '{30 S. LaMAF. * 448,3553 

www „TH RSAXONFUB.COM 


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17 RFW* 1 F W*W * * * % * * + i * 

JOHNNY NICHOLAS ’ 

STM »ll> . 

bus stop stallions ICi PM 111 

jor-dann Mitchell nuts 

■ No Cover Happy Hour 6PM 
Lioutysixxed w/David Holt & Gabe Rhodes 

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER IB ************* * * * 


Halford 



tTHlIOAdv/TllDnOr 


Midnight River Choir uonnuio 

1’ '^ivrr H i|T v. Hmir GPM 

Ixm Poole Sail w inr C osmic -Vieotclna 


SATURDAY, NOVE MBE RJ 9 * ***■*■*■ 

ElOHTYSIXXED w/David Holt 8pm $10 ' 1 

Rob Baird 


kb 


L0PM1IO 

JEREMY 3TEDINQ llAMM 

IMnd Span bfKillO 




SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20 *********** ** AHA* 


TH 8 neseNTMCNTS 

Mltll ihlff «nj 7 : jflpR |7 

I Bobby Whitlock 
&Coco Cafmel 



John Evans 

Hunter McKithi 
«n'd thi* ufFendt 


fiFUSJfl 

IftHTNiS 


unter Meatman 
and the Offenders is 

Deann Ren e am 


- 


a 


Waylon Payne 



with Paula Nelson 

tndi "tty ipititl fmrt fi« »*Wlr for rktiitd 
•i-fiPM $20 pr ■ Tmi*i daunpa. 

Rob Baird 7 PH $ i > 

SHAIN PANDER 

Ari Neufeld idjowu 

f The Leavers lljmM ILQ j 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 * *"*•*"*•* * * ‘fit w * * f A * * * .* 


Sir, City Presents, 

Some Gl f IS LIVE in Austin 
A Tribute fo the Rotting Stones 

1 0 30FM no 

1 5 ro*rr if vnu hn ny i rh lid's mv Enr ChriiFmmtt 

Bruce Hughes 

& (for *31 PHidt A im B.MlFMti 

DEULL CUUFE mS^Cmrrn^Uom 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23 * * * * * 


Slaid Cleaves 

Cari Hutson .<! 


/* _ « 11 . A 9PU|ISMr/11ID«rOf ! 

\jQ.\\ IIULJUII IhMFMtT 
f ^!g < ,.1\ a I km I Lot i; The NuUOttS bVV 


COMING UP 

Nov 24 Special Thanksgiving- Show 
"W.C. Clark and Eric Tessmer 
Nov. 25 White Ghost Shivers 
Nov. 26 Patrice Pike 



w/ Eli 


Holy Ghost! 


ar & Jessica 6 


c3concerts.com 


Frl 11/18 » S13/S15 9mn 

Paper Music 

(Pretty Light Music) 

Run DMT, 0ne4 All, WhiteNoise 

Mon 11/21 -813/815 8mn 

Ximena Sarinana 

Run DMT, One4 All, WhiteNoise 

c3concerts.com 

Fri 12/2 • $14/816 - 8nm 

Rachael Yamagata 

w / Mike Viola 

c3concerts.com 

Sat 12/3 ♦ $15 - 8nm 

The Wood Brothers 

w/ Carsie Blanton 

c3concerts.com 

UPCOMING: 

12/9 Digitalism w/ Data Romance (c3concerts.com) 

12/13 KUT Welcomes Trampled By Turtles 
w/ William Elliot Whitmore (c3concerts.com) 

12/14 Stephen Kellogg & The Sixers and Jon McLaughlin (c3concerts.com) 

1/21 MASON JENNINGS 

(tix onsale Fri 11/18 @ 10 am thru c3concerts.com) 


TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE 

214 East 6th Street • Austin, TX 

www.TheParishAustin.com 

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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER IS, 2011 the Austin chronicle 83 












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Monday November 2 1 st No Cover 


^Te^as Songwriter Showcase 6:30pm 

GEORGE ENSLE with BILL LEWIS 
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Tuesday November 22 nd No Cover 


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84 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


Scan with QR Mobile App 


FROM FRIDAY 


mohawk Outside: Texas School 
for the Deaf Benefit w/ The 
Great Nostalgicji, Gold Beach, 
the Dark Water Hymnal, Fresh 
Millions; Inside: Anam MilaJ, 
One Hundred Flowers, the Sour 
Notes J>, the Pons (8:00) 

momo’S Nat Adderley Tribute: 

Akina Adderley & the Vintage 
PlayboysJ w/ Erik Telford, Elias 
Haslanger (8:00) 

nd at sol studios The Foreign 
Exchange (8:00) 

neworldeli George Ensle 

one 2 one bar Michael Dillard, 
Aimless Gun, Brandon 
Steadman (9:00) 

papi UNO’S Son y No Son, DJ 
Richard Gear (6:00) 

paramount theatre Jolie Holland, 
the Jayhawks (8:00) ®© 


the parish White Noise, 0ne4AII, 
Run DMT, Paper Diamond (9:00) 

plush Sloppy Jackson (10:00) 

poodie’S hilltop roadhouse Larry 
Joe Taylor, John Evans (9:30) © 

poodle dog lounge Jerry Horn 
(9:00) 

red eyed fly Good Day Paradise, 
Friend City, One Red Martian, 
Madmartigan, Skatterbrains ® 

the red rooster The Haymakers 
(9:30) © 

republic live DJ Andrew Parsons 

riley’S tavern Pee Wee Moore 
(9:00) 

roadhouse Shuffle Up & Deal 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE Topaz, 
Mudphonic 

SAM’S town point Classic Rock 
Open Jam w/ Breck English 
(9:00) 


SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR Austin 

Kimble (7:00) 

saxon pub Earl Poole Ball & the 
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Malford Milligan, Midnight 
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SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 85 




Thur 11/17 Slim Bawb 
Fri 11/18 Therapy Sisters 
Sat 11/19 Leaky Faucets 
Thur 11/24 Closed 

i00,1lE:»BeniWhitea5;12-;444:-202( 



THU 

11/17 


ADRIAN aUESADA 
CHICKEN GEORGE 


FRI 

11/18 

SAT 

11/19 


TOPAZ & MUDPHONIC 
ZOUMOUNTCHI 


MON 

11/21 


TUE 

11/22 


THE MOELLER BROTHERS 
TRIBUTE TO DOYLE 
BRAMHALL 

MOOSE TONGUE TEXTURE 


•FORMERLY TC'S - FREE PARKING * 


1413 Webberville Rd. • 512 927-0700 



E7TTT1 













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30 




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01 




JORDAN WHITMORE 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

Chase Gassaway 


THE LOBLOLLY BOY 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

The Migrant, The Eastern Sea & OK Sweetheart 


THE BOXING LESSON 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

Muchos Backflips! , The Suite Unraveling, Megafauna 


GSMG SHOWCASE : ESTE VATO 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

Son De Rey 


THE BELLFURIES 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

The Horton Brothers 


THE BETA RHYTHM 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

Lola Cola & The Sweet Nuthin 


LITTLE BRAVE 

Doors 9:30PM $6.00 All Ages 

Holiday & Beau Jennings 


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LAST WALTZ AS PERFORMED BY MEMBERS OF 

VISEBITO, tfNG COBOafSO/. THE COVETEftS, 
T-BIfO 4 THE BBEAto, DBEW SMTH, JEBEiAy NAIL. 

coweoy & Indian, becvha* bbothebs. 

SIDESHOW TBA&EOy. eoosy CBAy AND NiANy OTHEBS. 
SCREENING or OBI&INAL TLW ® S TLW PEPRMD IN fULL ® ■<> 






VDV 


^HEA 1 lEirr 

AMA/SVERSAP-Y SHOW 


86 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


FROM FRIDAY 


skinny’s ballroom Toppie Haynes, 
Larry Ohms, Dim Locator, Horse 
+ Donkey J> (10:00) ® 

speakeasy Match Maker Band 
( 10 : 00 ) 

stardust club Clay Harrell 

Texas mist DJ Joe Hernandez 
(9:00) 

III FORKS Ken Slavin (7:00) © 

trailer space records Panhandle, 
TX; Swamp; Night Breed (7:00) 

0© 

triple crown Joel Hofmann 
Band (6:00); Zlam Dunk, Bike 
Problems, the Penny Dreadfuls 
( 10 : 00 ) © 

trophy’s Amanda Lepre, Vex, My 
Bastard Children (9:00) © 


amaya’S taco village Johnny 
Gonzales (5:00) 

ANDERSON MILL TAVERN K.B. & the 

Headliners 

antone’s The Shears, Zeale, 
Electric Touch (8:00) © 
artz rib house Sieker Band (7:30) 

© 

BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

Dahebegebees © 

beerland Boessi Kreh, the 
Sideshow Tragedy, Agent 
Ribbons, Ghost Wolves (9:00) 

’bout time DJ Element (9:00) 

broken spoke FFA/4-H Fundraiser 
w/ Sam Bentley Band, Kevin 
Fowler (6:00) 

CACTUS CAFE Kevin Welch (8:30) © 

carousel lounge The Whiskey 
Priest, Zookeeper (9:00) 

cedar street Jordan Tanner (6:00) 

CENTRAL MARKET NORTH Austin 
Friends of Traditional Music w/ 
Max Zimmet, the Carper Family, 
the Lost PinesJ> (5:00) © 

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTH Ava 

Arenella (6:30) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Doug 
Moreland 

CHERRYWOOD COFFEEHOUSE Viva La 
Paz, Ugly Numbers (8:00) © 

CHUGGIN’ MONKEY Tish & 
Misbehavin’ (9:00) 

continental club Gallery: Steve 
Bernal’s Zodiac, Mike Flanigin 
Trio w/ Frosty (8:30); In the 
Club: The Cornell Hurd Band 
(3:00), Shotgun Party, Lost 
Bayou Ramblers (10:00) © 

dizzy rooster Gary Lee Cox 
( 8 : 00 ) 

donn’S depot Hotcakes 

down under deli John Scholten 
Trio (8:00) 

the driskill hotel Patricia G. (8:00) 

east side design The Early Stages, 
She Sir Ji , John Wesley Coleman 
( 8 : 00 ) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE James 
Speer (8:00) © 

el sol y la luna Combo Saborea, 
La Mona Loca (9:00) © 

elephant room Ephraim Owens 
Quintet (9:30) 

Elysium Dr. Sketchy (5:00) 

emo’S Radio Fallouts, the 

Nevermind Project, Waiting for 
August, SquintJ) (9:00) © 


emo’S east Tesseract, Animals as 
Leaders, Between the Buried & 
Me (9:00) © 

esquinatango Bamako Airlines 
(9:30) © 

FADO IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT 

Mysterious Ways (9:30) 

flipnotics coffeespace Grace 
London, Will T. Massey, Secret 
Armadillo Society (6:00) © 

frank Megafauna, the Suite 
Unraveling, Muchos 
Backflips! J>, the Boxing Lesson 
(10:30) ©O 

Freddie’s place Pee Wee Moore 
( 6 : 00 ) © 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Dane Sterling (9:00) 

gruene hall Turnpike Troubadours, 
Jason Boland & the Stragglers 
(9:00) © 

guero’s taco bar Erin Jaimes 
(6:30) 

hole in the wall Gentlemen 
Rogues, Magnet School 
( 10 : 00 ) © 

hotel vegas Kingdom of Suicide 
Lovers, Woozyhelmet, Chainbow 
( 10 : 00 ) 

Lamberts The Dalles, East 
Cameron Folkcore, Guns of 
Navarone (10:30) 

latitude 30 Los Jefes (5:30) 

lucky lounge Vinyl Dharma, DJ 
Spyda, DJ Crues (9:00) 

maggie MAE’S Jeff Banks (7:00) 

mean-eyed cat Shawn Nelson & 
the Ramblers (9:00) 

mohawk Blackie, Indian Jewelry, 
Prince Rama, 400 Blows, Melt- 
Banana (8:00) © 

momo’s Fierce Bad Rabbit, Ghosts 
Along the Brazos, the Damn 
Torpedoes (8:00) © 

nasty’s Fuzz Club w/ DJ Sue, DJ 
Johnny Sleeper, the Vagues 
( 10 : 00 ) © 

neworldeli Made in the Shade 

NORTH BY NORTHWEST RESTAURANT & 

brewery Suzanne Smith © 

one 2 one bar Jack Valen, Will 
Evans Project, Kalu JamesJ> 
( 8 : 00 ) 

ORUN CENTER OF CULTURAL ARTS 

Anniversary Show w/ DJ 
Charlie, Finesse, Mindz 
of a Different Kind, Public 
Offenders, Gidon, Ras (9:00) 

papi tino’S Leticia Rodriguez 
( 6 : 00 ) 

plush Mugsy Flows, DJ Digg, DJ 
Crown 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE TeSSy 
Lou Williams, Michael Shane 
Borden (9:00) © 

poodle dog lounge David John & 
the Wildcards (9:00) 

red 7 The Scary Mondelosjg 
Threes Away, Far From Finished, 
Swingin’ Utters (9:00) © 

red eyed fly Bodacious Groovies, 
Cassette Daze, Makeshift 
Patriot, Panacea, the Nimbus 

THE RED ROOSTER LOU Dog Nights 
riley’S tavern Slim Bawb (9:00) 

THE SAHARA LOUNGE ZoUITIOUntchi 
SAN GABRIEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Back Porch Band (7:00) 

SATELLITE BISTRO & BAR Riley 
Osbourne (7:00) 

saxon pub David Spann, 

Eightysixxed, Rob Baird, Jeremy 
StedingJ* (6:00) 


CLUB LISTINGS 


SFC FARMERS’ MARKET AT SUNSET 

valley Emily Lively (10:00am) 

SFC FARMERS’ MARKET DOWNTOWN 

Austin Banjo Club (10:00am) 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

Mullet Boyz 

SHOOTERS BILLIARDS Sam RiggS 
(9:00) 

skinny’s ballroom Zest of Yore, 
the Gary, My Education J>, Scan 
Hopper (10:00) © 
speakeasy LC Rocks (10:00) 
stardust club Take Cover 
stubb’s Hank & Cupcakes, Steve 
Aoki, GobiJ> © 

Texas mist DJ Spinner (8:30) 
in forks Blue Mist (7:00) © 

triple crown Henry + the 
Invisibles^ (10:00) 

trophy’s My Bastard Children 
( 10 : 00 ) 

victory grill Mix It Up Saturdays 
w/ DJ Junior Vibes 

THE WATER-HOLE SALOON Space 
Heaters 

white swan lounge People vs. De 
la Rosa, We Know Where You 
Live, the Wrong Ones, Flash 
Boys (9:00) © 


artz rib house Bert Rivera (6:30) 

© 

BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL Open MiC W/ 
Justif (7:00) © 
bb rovers Open Mic (7:00) © 

b.d. riley’S Irish pub Irish Tunes 
Session (9:00) 

BLUE MOON ROCK & BLUES BAR Kevin 
& the Krawlers (8:00) 

bookpeople Chuck Eddy 
bout time A.J. Kline (8:00) 

cedar street The Initials (7:00), 
Much Love (8:00) 

CHERRYWOOD COFFEEHOUSE Laura 
Freeman & the Hey Lollies 
(10:30am) © 

chuggin’ monkey Wigeon Holland 
(9:00) 

continental club Gallery: Jon Dee 
Graham, Johnny Goudie; Mike 
Flanigin Trio w/ Jake Langley 
(8:30); In the Club: Junior 
Brown & Tanya Rae (7:00), 
Heybale! (10:00) 

cotton club Can’t Hardly Playboyz 
(7:00) © 

DIZZY ROOSTER Jo Hell (8:00) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Kris 
Kimura Quartet (7:00) © 

elephant room Jeff Hellmer Trio 
(9:30) 

elysium Regression w/ DJ 

Pumpkinspice, DJ Boba Fett, DJ 
Minimus 

emo’S Ready the Messenger, the 
Brigade, Decoder, the Bled 
( 8 : 00 ) ®© 

flipnotics coffeespace Pat Kay, 
Senayit, Alister M. (6:00) © 
Freddie’s place Billy Dee (6:00) © 

GREEN PASTURES RESTAURANT 

Jacques Vilmain (11:00am) © 
gruene hall Ruby Jane (12:30), 
Pete Anderson (4:00) ®© 

guero’s taco bar Mitch Webb & 
the Swindles (3:00) 

hole in the wall Fast Luke & the 
Lead Heavy, Trey Brown (10:00) 

house wine Justin Landers (6:00) 


ALL AGES VENUE ® ROADSHOW O RECOMMENDED j) HEAR MUSIC ONLINE 





















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THU, NOV 17 

6-8PM 

8-9PM 

9:15PM 

TONY HARRISON 

DANCE LESSONS 

JESSE DAYTON 

FRI, NOV 18 

8-9PM 

DANCE LESSONS 

9:15PM 

TWO TONS OF STEEL 

SAT, NOV 19 

8-9PM 

DANCE LESSONS 

9:30PM 

KEVIN FOWLER 

LIVESTOCK SHOW FUND RAISER 

TUI, NOV 22 

6-8PM 

AMANDA 


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BILLY GARZA 

WED, NOV 23 

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Tf BONTA 


8-9PM 

DANCE LESSONS 


9PM 

WELDON HENSON 


LIVE MUSIC 


THURSDAY, FRIDAY 
& SATURDAY 
6:30-9 PM 


@ CENTRAL PARK 
40th and North Lamar 
call 512.206.1000 for details 


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4477 South Lamar 
call 512.899.4300 for details 


WEDNESDAY ■ 
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6:30 - 9 PM 


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17 

BLACKBIRD 3 

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 1 8 

RATTLETREE MARIMBA 

african marimba dance music 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 

AUSTIN FRIENDS OF TRADITION MUSIC SHOWCASE 

s pm THE LOST PINES 
6 30PM CARPER FAMILY BAND 
5 pm MAX ZIMMET BAND 

FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 25 

CIENFUEGOScuban 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26 

JEFF LOFTON QUARTETjazz 

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 1 

BORDER TOWN BOOTLEGGERS 

western swing 

FRIDAY. DECEMBER 2 

COPA KINGS swing 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 

AKINA ADDERLEY 

soul, funk 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1 8 

TONY HARRISON 

western swing 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1 9 

AVA ARENALLA 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25 

DATRI BEAN 

french, hot jazz 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26 

JW & THE PROSPECTORS 

western swing 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 

MILKDRIVE 

americana, bluegrass 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2 

JACKIE BRISTOW 

singer-songwriter 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 

BLACKBIRD 3 

jazz 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7 

CLAY MCCLINTON 

americana 


cafe open 7am-9pm sunday-thursday; 7am-10pm friday & Saturday at both locations 



austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 87 

















CLUB LISTINGS 



29TH ST 





it 


a fthowcafte oi s*scy r 
a w ar d - wiaalufl Uao r b 



AttMjnttJMrra 

18' H Dirtij Mar tint & 

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^ SilUW 


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515 E BTH ST 512494 9338 

BRINGING LIVE MUSIC TO AUSTIN FDRfJftYEARS 

THURSDAY 11.17 *HIP HOP* DOORS 9:00 


SUBKULTURE PATRIOTS 
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SUNDAY 1 1 .20 * ROCK* DOORS 8:00 

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88 theaustin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


FROM SUNDAY 


HYDE PARK BAR & GRILL The 

Jitterbug Vipers (7:00) 

jovita’S Rockin’ Gospel Project 
(noon) © 

KICK BUTT COFFEE AT THE TRIANGLE 

Ted Hall’s Blues Church & Jam 
( 8 : 00 ) 

lucky lounge Peyton Eaton, Clay 
Compania, Lauren Silva (7:00) 

mean-eyed cat Quenby & West of 
Waylon (7:30) 

momo’S Starlings, TN; Beckham 
Bros.; Warren Hood & the 
Goods; King Biscuit (6:30) © 

nutty brown cafe Java Jazz 
(11:00am) © 

the oasis The Brew © 

papi tino’S Quasi Trois (11:30am) 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE TeSSy 
Lou Williams (3:00) © 

red 7 Garage Sale w/ Manikin, the 
Gospel Truth (2:00); the Shrine, 
Honky, Fu Manchu (9:00) © 

red eyed fly Monique Ortiz J>, 
Brothers and Sisters, Altitudes, 
Shattered Pain 

satellite bistro & bar Matt Farrell 
(11:30am) 

saxon pub Bobby Whitlock & CoCo 
Carmel, the Resentments, John 
Evans, Hunter McKithan (6:00) 

speakeasy Adam Rodgers (10:00) 

ST. DAVID’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Kanude (11:00am) © 

threadgill’S world hq Lincoln 
Durham (8:00) © 

triple crown Open Mic w/ Grant 
Ewing, Holly Aiken, Nate Hinds 

trophy’s ’80s Night (9:00) 

Waterloo ice house Jeff Lofton 
(11:00am) © 

Z’TEJAS Tres (6:00) 


antone’s Austin Blues Society 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

artz rib house Sarah Elizabeth 
Campbell & the Banned (7:30) 

© 

bar 141 Robbie’s Open Mic (9:00) 

b.d. riley’S Irish pub Open Mic 
(7:00) 

’bout time A.J. Kline (9:00) 

cedar street Matt Wilson BandJ) 
(9:00) 

chez zee Rich Demarco (6:30) © 

chuggin’ monkey Stewart Mann & 
the Statesboro Revue (9:00) 

continental club Gallery: Ben 
Livingston & the “That’s What 
She Said!” Boys, Afrofreque 
(8:30); In the Club: Adam 
Johnson & the Pay Me’s (6:30); 
Pete Anderson, Dale Watson & 
His Lone Stars (9:30) © 

dizzy rooster Tish & Misbehavin’ 
( 8 : 00 ) 

donn’S depot Chris Gage 
EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Kris 
Kimura Quartet (7:00) © 

elephant room Kevin Lovejoy 
(6:00), Jazz Jam w/ Freddie 
Mendoza (9:30) 

evangeline cafe Charles 

Thibodeaux & the Austin Cajun 
Aces (6:30) © 

FLIPNOTICS COFFEESPACE The 

Bluegrass Outfit (8:00) © 


giddy ups Mark Allen Atwood (7:00) 
gruene hall Bret Graham (6:00) 

© 

halcyon World Music Jam w/ 
Roberto Riggio (10:00) © 

the highball Match Maker Band 
(9:30) 

hole in the wall Mike & the 
MoonpiesJ*, Leo Rondeau 
( 10 : 00 ) 

la palapa Baby Dallas 
latitude 30 Chris TondreJ* (9:00) 

lucky lounge Farm Boy, Soulfed 
(9:00) 

MISTER TRAMPS SPORTS PUB & CAFE 

Open Mike Acoustic Jam w/ 
Nick HirschJ) (8:00) © 

mohawk Tijuana Bible, Shivery 
Shakes, Boy (10:00) © 

momo’S William Kelly, Amy Annelle, 
Jeremy Nail, Russell Beach, 
Michael Showalter (5:00); 

Chris Whitley Tribute w/ Nathan 
Singleton (9:30) 

MOZART’S COFFEE ROASTERS John 
Wilson (8:00) © 

mugshots Chuck Miller’s Acoustic 
Open Mic (8:00) 

the parish Avalanche City, Ximena 
Sarinana (8:00) © 

red eyed fly Lonely Playground^, 
Aimee Mac, Ryan CerchiaiJL 
Son of a Gun, Kacy Liles 

rutamaya Daniel Glass, Esoteric 
Dubstep & Gypsy Bazaar (7:00) 

© 

the Sahara lounge Moeller Bros. 
( 10 : 00 ) 

saxon pub Dustin Welch, Shawn 
Pander, Ari Neufeld, the 
Leavers (7:00) 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

Brent Michael Wood 
speakeasy Caitie Taylor (10:00) 

THREADGILL’S WORLD HQ JeSS Klein 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

triple crown Robbie Doyen & 
James Thompson (6:00); Chief 
& the Doomsday Device (9:00) 

victory grill Open Pro Blues Jam 
w/ Matthew Robinson, Harold 
McMillan (9:00) 

whip in Brittany Shane (8:00) © 


angel’s icehouse Singer- 

Songwriter Open Mic (9:00) © 

antone’s Blue Tuesday w/ Derek 
O’Brien, Malford Milligan, Chris 
Layton (10:30) © 

artz rib house Texas Old Time 
Fiddlers Jam (7:30) © 

b.d. riley’S Irish pub Suzanne 
Smith (7:00) 

beerland Dahling, Special Guest, 
Elway (9:00) ® 

’BOUT TIME A.J. Kline (9:00) 

broken spoke Amanda, Billy Garza 
( 6 : 00 ) 

carousel lounge Jazz Destroyers, 
Atlas Maior (7:00) 

cedar street Much Love, Encore 
( 8 : 00 ) © 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE John 
Evans, John Evans 

chuggin’ monkey Sonny Wolf (9:00) 

continental club Gallery: James 
McMurtry, Ephraim Owens 
Experience (8:30); In the Club: 
Toni Price (6:30); LZ Love, 
Barfield (10:30) 


dizzy rooster Cody Jasper (8:00) 

donn’S depot Donn & the Station 
Masters 

the driskill hotel Driskill Bar: Liz 
Morphis (8:00) 

EDDIE V’S EDGEWATER GRILLE Bruce 
James Soultet (7:00) © 

elephant room Stanley Smith 
(6:00), Aaron Allen (9:30) 

elysium Yacht Club (8:00) 

evangeline cafe Brennen Leigh 
(7:00) © 

FLIPNOTICS COFFEESPACE Seth 
Sherman (7:00) ®, Erik 
Hokkanen’s Laboratory (9:00) © 
g&s lounge Supervillains (9:30) © 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

The Conclusion Jumpers 
(9:00) 

gruene hall Song Swap w/ Tom 
Gillam (6:00) © 

hill’s cafe Singer-Songwriter Night 
w/ Jon Burklund © 

hole in the wall Clyde & Clem’s 
Whiskey BusinessJ) (10:00) 

house wine David Webb (8:00) 

HYDE PARK BAR & GRILL Jimi Lee 
(7:00) 

INTERCONTINENTAL STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 

Terrace: Weldon Henson 

la palapa Baby Dallas 
Lamberts Luis Banuelos (7:30) 

lucky lounge Hunters & 
GatherersJ* (10:00) 

LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS BAR & 

restaurant Josh & Jason, the 
Twalls (6:00) 

malaia world lounge Psymbionic 

MANGIA CHICAGO STUFFED PIZZA 

Austinsongz (7:00) 

mean-eyed cat Bear & the 
Essentials (7:30) 

mohawk Mike & the MoonpiesJ> 
(5:00) ©; Knifight, the Sour 
NotesJ>, Ed Sc-hrader’s Music 
Beat, Future Islands (10:00) 

© 

momo’S Kelsey’s Jazz Project, Will 
T. Massey, Songwriter Series, 
Will Evans (5:00) 

one 2 one bar Spit & Tears, 

Karl Morgan, Treetop Sailors 
(10:45) 

patsy’s cafe Sand & Sunnie (6:30) 
plush Sonar 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE Ari 

Neufeld (4:00); Jon Inmon, 
Strolling Scones (8:30) © 
red 7 Twin Prisons, Neverwas © 

red eyed fly Drain, Bear Suit 
Sucker Punch, the Abstract, 
SynthetamineJ* 

riley’S tavern Samantha Lynn (9:00) 
ruta maya Poetry Open Mic, Music 
Open Mic (6:00) © 

the Sahara lounge Moose Tongue 
Texture 

saxon pub Bruce Hughes, Rob 
Baird, Grady Skelton (8:00) 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

Dean Seltzer 

skinny’s ballroom Bob Hoffnar 
(7:00) 

THREADGILL’S WORLD HQ Jon Dee 

Graham (8:00) © 

TRAILER SPACE RECORDS The Flesh 
Lights, Naw Dude (7:00) © 


See austinchronicle.com 

for complete listings. 


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FROM TUESDAY 


triple crown Phil Stevens & Pat 
Pankratz (6:00); Young/// 
Savage, the Drafted, War of 
Attrition, Victor Hoik (9:00) 

trophy’s Acoustic Open Mic 
(9:00) 

Waterloo ice house Honky Tonk 
Tuesday w/ Evan Christian 
( 6 : 00 ) © 

Z’TEJAS Tameca Jones (6:00) 


amaya’S taco village Johnny 
Gonzales (5:00) 

ANDERSON MILL TAVERN CJ VenSOn 

artz rib house Danny Britt (7:30) 

© 

bat bar Austin Heat (11:00) 

b.d. riley’S Irish pub Brooke Avid 
( 10 : 00 ) 

broken spoke T. Jarrod Bonta, 
Dance Lessons, Weldon 
Henson (6:00) 

carousel lounge King Khan & the 
Shrines, Gods Are Ghosts, the 
Lightning Jars, Skirt the Issue 
(7:00) © 

cedar street Thunder God Riders 
of Justice, the Spazmatics 
( 6 : 00 ) 

CHEATHAM STREET WAREHOUSE Kent 
Finlay’s Songwriters Circle 
( 11 : 00 ) 

chuggin’ monkey Aaron Navarro 
(9:00) 

continental club Gallery: Barbara 
K; Trube, Farrell, & Snizz 
(8:30); In the Club: Bordertown 
BootleggersJ) (6:30); Jon Dee 
Graham, James McMurtry 
( 10 : 00 ) 

dizzy rooster Jakwagon (8:00) 

donn’S depot Frank & the Station 
Masters 

the driskill hotel Driskill Bar: 
Bruce Smith (8:00) 

eddie v’S edgewater grille James 
Speer (8:00) © 

elephant room Jazz Pharoahs 
(6:00), the Estuary Quintet 
(9:30) 

elysium Mid-Wave w/ DJ Pumpkin 
Spice, DJ Edminister (8:00) 


flipnotics coffeespace Aaron 
Tinjum, Daryl Scherrer, Nick 
Marcotte, the Light Upstairs 
( 6 : 00 ) © 

giddy ups Open Mic (8:00) 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Weldon Henson (9:00) 

gruene hall Dirty River Boys, Cory 
Morrow (8:00) © 

the highball Black Red Black 
( 8:00 & 10 : 00 ) 

hole in the wall Magnetar, Hymn 
for Her © 

INTERCONTINENTAL STEPHEN F. AUSTIN 

Terrace: Ray Prim 

Lamberts The Jitterbug Vipers 
(7:30) 

las palomas Javier Chaparro, Rick 
McRae, Terry Hale, Art Kidd 
(6:30) © 

maria maria Jeff Lofton QuartetJ) 
(7:00) © 

mean-eyed cat The Moonhangers 
(7:30) 

MOJOE ROOM BAR & GRILL Love & 
Harmony Open Mic (9:30) © 

momo’S The Last Waltz screen- 
ing w/ Boosy Cray, Drew 
Smith, Cowboy & Indian, 
Wisebird, T Bird & the Breaks 
( 8 : 00 ) 

one 2 one bar Miguel McDonald, 
Ady Hernandez, Shawn Tuthill, 
Kenn Gullett (9:00) 

plush Kris Wadsworth, Daniel 
Allen, Utah, Colin Peterson 
( 10 : 00 ) 

POODIE’S HILLTOP ROADHOUSE 

Ashley Monical (4:00), Open 
Mic (7:00) © 

reale’S pizza & cafe “Frankly” 
Singing w/ Ken Kruse (6:30) 

red eyed fly Big Ole Band 

red shed tavern Open Mic w/ Amy 

Zamarripa (8:00) 

riley’S tavern Robbie Doyen 
(9:00) 

ruta maya Dance Lessons, La 
Mona Loca (7:45) © 

the Sahara lounge Boot Money 

SAM’S town point Open Blues Jam 
w/ Breck English (9:00) 

saxon pub The Nortons (6:00); 
Slaid Cleaves, Cari Hutson 
(9:00) 


CLUB LISTINGS 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

The Space Rockers 

SHOOTERS BILLIARDS NORTH Suede 
(9:00) 

skinny’s ballroom Tim Curry Trio 
(5:00); Danny Malone, Nakia & 
the Blues Grifters (7:00) 

speakeasy Three Cocks & a Box 
( 10 : 00 ) 

triple crown Emily Herring (6:00) 

© 

trophy’s Big Ole Band, Cause in 
Effect, Hundred Watt Three, 
Nathan’s Stupid Drama 

volstead lounge Libertine Social 
Club w/ DJ Scorpio, DJ John 
Gomi (10:00) 

WATERLOO ICE HOUSE Eggjam, 
Ptarmigan (7:00) © 

Waterloo ice house Open Mic w/ 
Julie Nolen (10:00) 

Z’TEJAS Jeff Plankenhorn, Stephen 
Doster, Bill Carter (6:00) 


IdiilirfciiTA+MI 

continental club Gallery: The 
Peterson Bros., Tameca Jones 
(8:30); In the Club: Dale 
Watson’s Thanksgiving Dance 
(9:00) 

the driskill hotel Driskill Bar: The 
Atomic Duo (7:00) 

elephant room Albanie & Her 
Fellas (6:00), Jon Blondell 
Quintet (9:30) 

elysium Thanksgiving Escape w/ 

DJ Cos 

FLIPNOTICS COFFEESPACE Open Mic 
w/ Lisa Kettyle (8:00) © 

GINNY’S LITTLE LONGHORN SALOON 

Alvin Crow (9:00) 

mohawk The American Spirit 
(5:00) 

momo’S Jason Blum, Betty Black 

one 2 one bar Candiland, Natalie 
Zoeji (9:00) 

roadhouse Mojo Jam 

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE Jeff 
Lofton (7:00) 

saxon pub Eightysixxed (6:00), 
W.C. Clark (10:00) 

SHERLOCK’S BAKER ST. PUB & GRILL 

The Space Rockers 

triple crown Molly J. Hayes 
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See austinchronicle.com for complete listings. 


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GIVE ME LIBERTY... 

...or give me great hair. You 
complemented my hair, and said 
your name is Doug. Your friend 
pulled you outside. I regretted not 
staying. Maybe we can meet there 
again. When: Saturday, Novem- 
ber 5, 2011. Where: The Liberty. 
You: Man. Me: Woman. #905424 


B i ;1 EV ;1 'A iriTn^M 


Your drove by me in the parking 
garage when I was walking my 
coonhound inside. You stop and 
rolled down your window to tell 
me you had a coonhound too. 
When: Monday, November 7, 
2011. Where: Triangle Building 
A Parking Garage. You: Woman. 
Me: Man. #905423 

GOLD/DARK SKIN 

Shpongle at Emos East. You had 
gold nose ring and X's on hands. I 
had a black eyebrow piercing and 
chops. Still want that dance with 
such a beautiful girl. When: Fri- 
day, November 4, 2011. Where: 
Emos East. You: Woman. Me: 
Man. #905422 

MOHAWK GIRL, REDRIVER 

Saturday night, 1 1/5. We smiled 
at each other outside the tattoo 
shop and on the patio at Sidebar. 
You left before I could buy you 
a drink. Second chance? When: 
Saturday, November 5, 2011. 
Where: Red River. You: Woman. 
Me: Man. #905421 


1 1 1 j y Lj j ; | =j J | ; 7 : ^ I 


I was Thor, you were Tiffany. You 
had a friend Lucia. Gave you my #, 
saw you call, but no missed call :(. 
Guess there's a typo keeping us 
apart. When: Sunday, October 30, 
2011. Where: The Forest Party. 
You: Woman. Me: Man. #905418 


MT'T'j El T T]TB 


Kicking myself for not stopping as 
you smiled and called me by name. 
Your boots were cool, but the 
smile behind your eyes dropped 
me to my knees. Please risk.;-) 
When: Friday, October 28, 2011. 
Where: Starbucks at Braker Lane. 
You: Woman. Me: Man. #905416 


I j 1 ' K | =1 ^ i 1 J ;i 


You: Beautiful hair pulled back in a 
ponytail. Leaving around 10:30 am 
into a silver VW Passat. Great morn- 
ing to play tennis and you agreed. 
Let meet for breakfast When: Sat- 
urday, October 22, 2011. Where: 
Caswell Tennis Center. You: 
Woman. Me: Man. #905414 


WTiT 7 l -V J fJTTH u I'Ll 4U 


You were walking your black cocker 
spaniel. We stood on a bench 
together. Me: black woman with 
pink shirt and skirt You: black man 
in UT hoodie, black shorts When: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2011. 
Where: Out front of the Bob Bull- 
ock Museum UT Campus. You: 
Woman. Me: Woman. #905413 


^K^TTTi ■ i A i Wl\ ;T 


1 1 pm, 10/21/11, You: Bearded lady 
at Scare for the Cure, taught me 
to Waltz. Me: Still have your $2 
mustache rides button. Let's scare 
up a howling good time. When: 
Friday, October 21, 2011. Where: 
Scare for the Cure. You: Woman. 
Me: Man. #905412 



Thursday 12:38pm: platinum 
blonde readying red SUV to leave 
median next to Spec's. You: flash- 
ing me one of the most handsome 
grins in existence from your black 
pickup. Whiskey sometime? 
When: Thursday, October 20, 
2011. Where: Airport Blvd. You: 
Man. Me: Woman. #905411 


1U 1— uv 


oo 


Any artist who can afford a studio in East Austin must be doing pretty well, 
right? Those digs ain’t cheap. If you’re doing the EASTside shuffle this weekend, 
don’t expect kegs of PBR and Cheez Whiz on saltines - well, unless it’s being 
served ironically, which is difficult to prove without seeming like a huge dick. 
More than likely you’ll be treated to a variety of tasty independent craft brews 
too thick to suck through a beer bong, gluten-free hors d’oeuvres (Seriously: No 
one gives a shit about glutens or even knows what they are, and if they do they’re 
probably so neurotic about their health that they’re going to die of an aneurysm 
anyway), and, of course, the staple of art openings: cheap but serviceable wines. 
Sometimes they’re wines from places and vintners you’ve never heard of (What? 
You’ve never had Pirate Pete’s Pinot Grigio? It’s one of the finest wines in all of 
Somalia!), and sometimes they’re quasi-ghetto wines cleverly redecanted. Then 
there are the boxed wines. Boxed wines are fair game as long as you get jiggy with 
it. Just plopping a Bota Box down on a rented folding table is too low rent even 
for East Austin ... even if _ . _ 

you re doing it ironically EaSt AUSt,n Stud, ° T ° Ur 

True artists know it’s not Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 19-20 • East Austin 

what’s in the box that www.eastaustinstudiotour.com 

matters; it’s how the box 

looks on the outside. Imagine the Gallo brothers on the label, but with Rollie 
Fingers-style Movember mustaches and Tyrolean alpine hats Sharpied onto their 
heads. The cool thing about making art is that you can never be too over the top. 
Wait a minute . . . OK, if you’re going to start making masks out of human skin 
like Leatherface . . . well . . . granted . . . envelope pushed . . . broken . . . shat on. On 
the other hand, if you want wrap a cluster of islands in 600,000 square meters of 
pink polypropylene or photograph yourself with a bullwhip shoved up your ass, 
have at it. There is really no bad art, only art stupid people don’t understand. If 
you’ve ever found yourself staring intently at a Pollock painting thinking, “What 
the fucking fuck? I could duct-tape a paintbrush to a Chihuahua’s head and do 
better than this,” don’t get your panties in a wad. It just means you don’t have an 
art history degree from Bryn Mawr. Some art is done for art’s sake. That means 
that it’s completely useless for anything other than being a piece of art. Ironically 
enough, a lot of art for art’s sake ends up being pressed into uses completely 
unintended and unimagined by the artist. More often than not that use is as a 
drink coaster or paperweight, but it can involve other things like boat anchors, 
oil-drip pans, dartboards . . . really the list is nearly as endless as artistic possibility. 
Then, of course, there are those pieces of art with similar characteristics that sell 
for millions of dollars. If this keeps you awake at night, it shouldn’t. Yes, there 
are generally agreed upon rules and standards in art. For instance: Who doesn’t 
love a fleece blanket with the airbrushed image of Elvis on it? Crazy people, 
that’s who. Mostly, however, the value of art is highly subjective and determined 
by rank emotion and caprice - just like an episode of American Idol. Trying to 
determine the value of a piece of art is risky business - like betting money on a 
quarterback named Manning or barebacking a South African prostitute. Buying 
art should always be done with the same sense of resignation you use to justify an 
expensive trip to Vegas: You’re probably going to lose money on the deal, but at 
least the drinks are free. Who knows, you may hit the jackpot and take home the 
next Picasso or Warhol or Schneider, or Fontenot, or you might just take home an 
interesting little dalliance that reminds you of the time you got blotto on compli- 
mentary boxed wine and wandered around formerly sketchy neighborhoods look- 
ing at art on a beautiful Saturday afternoon. How much is that worth? Priceless. If 
you’re looking to look at some art, you can’t pick a better time than this weekend, 
which is the last weekend of the East Austin Studio Tour, a chance to get to know 
more than 100 local artists and studios as well as familiarize yourself with the 
streets and neighborhoods of East Austin. All you have to do to get started is pick 
up an EAST catalog at one of the Austin Public Libraries, or go online to the EAST 
website and download a PDF map of the tour. Go ahead, get your art on. 

GET ON THE LIST & GET THE LUV DOC ALL UP IN YOUR 


INBOX EVERY WEEK 


austinchronicle.com/lllVdOClist 



MEET CHRONICLE 
READERS WHO SHARE 
YOUR ACTIVITIES 
AND INTERESTS 


ORGANIC SENSUOUS LISTENER 

Calling in my lover/muse (Redhead gardener 
Deva generously juicy abundantly giving and receiving tantri- 
ca yogini lifeforce) to dance with joy (and me) 
in our unconditional new now. 

soulogic, 58 

BROWSE through tons more pics and profiles at 
austinchronicle.com/personals 


COMIX 



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MR. SMARTY PANTS KNOWS 


Dr Pepper was caffeine-free until 1917. 

According to author Stephen L. Macknik, your eye is the equiva- 
lent of a l-megapixel camera. You see rich colors because it’s 
connected to your brain. 

The UK celebrates Remembrance Day instead of Veterans Day. The 
English wear a red remembrance poppy, a symbol from the poem 
“In Flanders Fields.” These poppies bloomed on some of the worst 
battlefields of Flanders in World War I; their color symbolic of the 
blood spilled there. 

In 1961, while becoming the first person to ever orbit the earth, 
Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin hummed “O Sole Mio.” At the 
1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, Belgium, “O Sole Mio” was played 
when music for the Italian national anthem could not be found. 



At left is information that Mr. 
Smarty Pants read in a book , a 
magazine, or the newspaper; 
heard on the radio; saw on tele- 
vision; or overheard at a party. 
Got facts? Write to Mr. Smarty 
Pants at the Chronicle, or email 
mrpants@austinchronicle.com. 



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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 93 

















Altech Services Inc., subsidiary of Trowbridge & 
Trowbridge LLC currently has an opening in our 
Austin, Texas location for a COMPUTER SECURITY 
SPECIALIST/NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR. 
Maintain and administer LAN/WAN and Data Center 
related computing environments including network 
router, switch hardware, network software and their 
configurations. If interested in applying for this position, 
please refer to Job Code 6431 .1 in the subject line 
and submit your resume including pay requirements to 
careers@tt-llc.com 


ADVERTISING SALES 

The Austin Chronicle 

is looking for a classified 
advertising account representative to 

join our sales team. The ideal candidate 
must be a hungry self-starter with the 
ability to cold call like a madman. Or 
woman. Online sales experience would 
be even better. 

Candidates must have crazy strong 
customer service and organizational 
skills and be computer literate. However, 
if you feel the need to update your 
Facebook status every five minutes, this 
might not be the job for you. 

In return, you’ll receive base and com- 
mission along with bonus opportunities, 
and you’ll get to hang out in a one-of- 
a-kind work environment. The Chronicle 
also offers paid vacations/holidays, 
health/vision/dental, 401(k) program, 
and the occasional free breakfast taco. 

Sound like you? For real? 

Then fax resume to 
512/458-6910 or email: 
cassidy@austinchronicle.com. EOE. 



austinchronicle.com 


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ART/DESION 


MOVIE EXTRAS People needed 
now to stand in the background 
for a major film. Earn up to $300 
per day. Exp. not required. CALL 
NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE 
PERSON. 877-426-8310 (AAN 
CAN) 

RECORDING ENGINEER 

Droplink Studios is hiring a part 
time engineer! We are a growing 
studio and have the need for 
another recording engineer to 
join our crew. Required Skill Set: 
Completion of Audio Engineering 
education, Advanced ProTools 
experience, practice with an 
analog console and patchbays. 
General Midi knowledge preferred. 
Familiarity with Logic, Reason, 
Live, and other software. The 
ability and desire to work with 
all genres. We are not looking for 
an intern and we are not looking 
for someone to teach. We are 
taking only experienced recording 
engineers that are self-sufficient 
and fully capable of running 
large scale recording sessions. 
Your ability to move to full time 
depends on you. Inquire via 
email with links or attachments 
of current work to jwoodhouse@ 
droplinkstudios.com. 


CASTING 


CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 


HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA 

Graduate in just 4 weeks!! 

FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 
1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www. 
continentalacademy.com (AAN 
CAN) 


EDUCATION 


PYP COORDINATOR Primary 
Years Program Coordinator. Posi- 
tion with Magellan International 
School in Austin, TX. Submit 
resumes referencing PYP Coordi- 
nator and job code 11053 to HR, 
Magellan International School, 
7130 Chimney Corners, Austin, 
TX 78731. Magellan International 
School is an EOE. 


GENERAL 


AUDITIONS National company 
now holding open auditions for 
Fall season. Dancers needed, 
male/female all styles, hip-hop, 
jazz, modern, ethnic all a plus. Call 
512-743-4568 for appointment at 
Galaxy Dance Studios. 

MAGICIAN’S ASSISTANT 

Travel Required. Contact Dream 
Catcher Magic 512-689-5851 . No 
experience required. Needs to be 
approx. 100 lbs & 5ft tall. 

MOVIE EXTRAS 

Movie extras to stand in back- 
ground for major film production. 
Earn up to $200 per day. Experi- 
ence not required. 877-422-2044 


ASSEMBLY $$$HELP WANT- 
ED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling 
CD cases from 

Home! No Experience Necessary! 
Call our Live Operators Now! 
1-800-405-7619 

EXT 2450 http://www.easywork- 
greatpay.com (AAN CAN) 


What are YOU Going To Do About 
YOUR Future? 

Check This Out! www.PlaceOf- 
Freedom.com 

MAILERS Paid In Advance! 

= Make $1000 a Week mailing 
brochures from home! Guaranteed 
Income! FREE Supplies! No 
experience required. Start Imme- 
diately! www.homemailerprogram. 
net (AAN CAN) 

WAREHOUSE SUPERVIOSR 

The ACC Bookstore is looking 
for an energetic person with 
a positive attitude to fill a full 
time (30-40) hourly position as 
shipping/receiving supervisor. 
Applicants must have 1 year 
relevant experience, be detailed 
oriented and organized. Must be 
able to lift 60lbs, work standing for 
up to 8 hours and be comfortable 
with computer data entry. High 
School diploma or equivalent 
needed. Send resume to SM174@ 
bncollege.com. 

WELLNESS COACH Work as 
Wellness Coach on your free time. 
Make an extra $1 ,000mo! Call 
supervisor Jose, 512-297-9632. 


NON-PROFIT 


TRAINING MANAGER Develop 
and coordinate training events. 
Some travel required. Preferred 
3 years experience in training 
management & public health. See 
online ad for details. Send resume, 
writing sample, salary history to 
gperry@cardeaservices.org 


PROFESSIONAL 


OIL & GAS 

Join the adventure!! High paying 
career opportunities in the oil & 
gas industry. 254-744-4899 


PROJECT ENGINEER Position 
with Active Power in Austin, TX. 
Duties include provide technical 
product support for the develop- 
ment and implementation of 
customers’ applications dealing 
with complex Power Quality 
Systems. Submit resumes refer- 
encing Project Engineer and job 
code Til 0406 to Manager, Talent 
Development, 2128 W. Braker Ln 
BK 12, Austin, TX 78758. Active 
Power is an EOE. 


REAL ESTATE 


LICENSED REALTOR I don’t 
know how they found me Marty, 
but they found me! 2010 and the 
future is here. Want to make some 
real money this year? Come work 
for a home-grown real estate start- 
up. We’re two years young, and 
growing! We take a lower cut than 
most people would dream of. 20%/ 
Pay your own MLS fees and hit the 
ground running. Brand yourself 
or work under ours. Looking for 
those who “get it” and know how 
toTCB. Let’s talk! 512-669-8269 
austinreallist@gmail.com. Broker, 
#0579334 


RESTAURANT/ 
RETAIL 


BARTENDER BECOME A BAR- 
TENDER! Up to $300 a day. No 
exp. necessary. Training Courses 
Available. 1-800-965-6520 x 207. 


LINE COOK 


Well Seasoned Line Cook 

AM Hours, must be fast, 
efficient, organized. Good 
attitude a must, good pay. Apply 
with resume after 2pm daily. 

Counter Cafe 
626 N. Lamar Bl. 78703 


WAITSTAFF hut’s hamburgers is 
looking for a experienced server. 

2 years minimum experience, if 
this is a second job or if you are a 
student you must be flexible, you 
must be able to work both day and 
night shifts, there is a minimum 
2 week training program before 
you get on the floor, and you will 
need to be able to work behind the 
counter as needed, apply at hut’s 
hamburgers 807 w 6th st. between 
the hours of 9-11 or 2-4 ONLY. NO 
PHONE CALLS. 


SALES/ 

MARKETING 

ADVERTISING SALES 

THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE is look- 
ing for a Classified Advertising 
Account Representative to join our 
sales team. The ideal candidate 
must be a hungry self-starter with 
the ability to cold call. Online 
Sales experience would be even 
better. Candidates must have 
crazy strong customer service 
and organizational skills and be 
computer literate. In return, you’ll 
receive base + commission. The 
Chronicle also offers paid vaca- 
tions/holidays, health/ vision/den- 
tal, 401 (k) program. Fax resume to: 
512-458-6910 or email cassidy@ 
austinchronicle.com. EOE 

TELEMARKETERS 

Wanted: Money Motivated Sales 
Staff. Can earn $8-$15 per hour or 
more. Experience a plus but not 
necessary. Call today! Must be 
able to work nights and weekends. 
Call 512-452-7400 


STUDIES 


UT PTSD STUDY 

Have you been raped, attacked, 
experienced a serious car ac- 
cident, or combat experience 
and continue to be haunted by 
memories of the trauma? 

You may be eligible to receive 
therapy and/or an investigational 
medication as a research par- 
ticipant in the UT PTSD HELP 
Study. To be eligible you must be 
between 18 and 65, not currently 
taking antidepressants, and pass 
a clinical screening interview. 

To apply contact: 

UT Laboratory for the Study of 
Anxiety Disorders at 51 2-404-91 1 8 


Is your KNEE PAIN keeping you 
from doing things you enjoy? 



Tekton Research is conducting a research study to evaluate 
the safety and effectiveness of an investigational medication 
to treat knee pain due to osteoarthritis . You may qualify if you: 

- are between 40 and 85 years of age 

- have osteoarthritis in your knee 

- are currently taking medication 

- are still experiencing moderate to severe pain. 

If you qualify, all study-related health care, lab tests and study 
drug are provided at no charge. You will also be compensated 
up to $425 for your participation. For more information, 

call us, follow us or visit our website! m 0 oo tz-t-i-t 

(512) 3oo-5717 


U teHtod 

R.E > ( l I < H 
www.TektonResearch.com 



Are You a Healthy, Post Menopausal Woman? 

If bgl you may quality for a research study to determine the effects 

ol a medication on bone heat th You may be eligible * you dm: 


- a healthy woman, 75 years of age or younger 

- post menopausal tor at leasl $ yaars 

- willing to lake Vitamin D and Calcium supplement. 


If eligible, you may receive siudy-iflleted physical eaeminaion*, 
lab tests, oMics visits , eleelrocardiogmm . bone densily scars 
iDXA). slcdy meditation, ViiaminD and Calcium supplements 
e' no cost- may also be oompensolsd up to $800.. 


lb learn more about the bone health study, pisa&a pall: 

( 512 ) 388-5717 


tria ls@TektonResearch.com 



94 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 




BONE HEALTH 

ARE YOU A HEALTHY, POST 
MENOPAUSAL WOMAN? 

If so you may qualify for a 
research study to determine 
the effects of a medication 
on bone health. You may be 
eligible if you are: 

• a healthy woman, 75 years of 
age or younger 

• post menopausal for at least 
5 years 

• willing to take Vitamin D and 
Calcium supplements 

If eligible, you may receive 
study-related physical 
examinations, lab tests, office 
visits, electrocardiogram, bone 
density scans (DXA), study 
medication, Vitamin D and 
Calcium supplements at no 
cost. You may also be compen- 
sated up to $600. To learn more 
about the bone health study, 
please call: 


TEKTON RESEARCH 

(512) 388-5717 

www.tektonresearch.com 


kj TEhTDn 


EARN HOLIDAY CASH WWW. 
austintechinsights.com is cur- 
rently looking for participants 
for upcoming focus groups and 
interviews. Are you or someone 
you know into technology? If so 
join our database to participate 
in technology based research. 


OSTEOARTHRITIS 

IS YOUR KNEE PAIN 
KEEPING YOU FROM 
DOING THINGS 
YOU ENJOY? 

Tekton Research is 
conducting a research study to 
evaluate the safety and effec- 
tiveness of an investigational 
medication to treat knee pain 
due to osteoarthritis. You may 
qualify if you: 

• are between 40 and 85 years 
of age 

• have osteoarthritis in your 
knee 

• are currently taking 
medication 

• are still experiencing 
moderate to severe pain. 

If you qualify, all 
study-related health care, 
lab tests and study drug are 
provided at no charge. You will 
also be compensated up to 
$425 for your participation. For 
more information, call us, fol- 
low us or visit our website! 

512-388-5717 

TEKTON RESEARCH 
TektonResearch.com 


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APARTMENT/ 
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2 / 1 ... $899 

Hardwood floors, gas 
cooking. Hidden com- 
munity near Central Market, 
recent remodel. Ceramic tile 
and hardwood floor throughout. 
Quiet residential neighborhood. 
Walking distance to shops & 
restaurants. 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

f^fteam 

real estate 

CENTRAL 

AustinCool.com 

(512)693-7231 

SPRING LOFT TOWER 

HIP WEST DOWNTWOWN 
Nightlife & Restaurant Area 
by Whole Foods. Fewer Units 
per floor mean quieter living. 
Ultra-modern w/floor to ceiling 
windows, downtown views. 
Includes parking. 

AUSTINCOOL.COM 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 


\rtt~ 


CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Zilker ParkTownhome 
with attached garage. Minutes 
to Zilker Park via sidewalk! W/D 
connections. Three-story unit 
with no one above or below. 


CENTRAL 693-7231 AustinCool. 
com Downtown elegance, 
city-views, hardwoods. Rooftop 
deck, W/D. 

CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Huge eclectic S 0 C 0 
1/1 in small property off South 
Congress near Jo’s. Gas cooking, 
free parking, 6-month lease, 
$1,000 ABP! 

CENTRAL Small Clarksville 
community. Hardwood floors. 

All new appliances, designer 
paint and ceiling fans. Gas, 

Trash, and Cable paid. 1-1 $775, 

2 bed $1050. Call now 231-9888 
agent, www.apartmentlocating. 
com 

CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Town Lake 2/2, Pool 
on Lake, minutes to downtown, 
open Euro design, equal-sized 
bedrooms, $1,136. 

CENTRAL 

OLTORF NEAR DOWN- 
TOWN 

Large Open Floor Plans with 
Private Patios, W/D Connections. 
Hidden in Trees, 

5 Minutes to Downtown. 

1/1 ... $559 
2/2... $749 
Units ready for 
immediate move-in! 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 


f^Tteam 

real estate 

AVli* 


CENTRAL $596 near 
Downtown Entertainment 
District! $299 Total Move In. Free 
Cable. 512-231-9888 
www.apartmentlocating.com 

CENTRAL Available downtown 
rentals on Lake $952. Huge 1/1 
on Congress $1000 ABP! Travis 
Heights $625 w/cable. Call Rick 
w/Properties Plus (512) 447-7368. 

CENTRAL 70’S Retro Artsy total 
renovation. Wood & Tile floors. 
Covered parking. Neto-pool. $700 
231-9888 

www.apartmentlocating.com 


CENTRAL 

AustinCool.com 

COOL 

CENTRAL 

APARTMENTS, LOFTS & 
CONDOS FOR RENT & 
SALE! (512) 693-7231 
AUSTINCOOL.COM 

CENTRAL 

AustinCool.com 

BRIDGES ON 
THE PARK 

Live on the Trail! Loft-style 
condo. High ceilings, granite 
countertops, hardwood floors, 
W/D included, large windows, 
gas range. 

512-693-7231 


Vw 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 

CENTRAL 

soco 

RESTAURANT/ 

SHOPPING 

DISTRICT 

Courtyard community, backs 
to Lady Bird hike-and-bike trail. 

Walking distance to shops/ 
restaurants. Newly Remodeled! 
Wood floors, 

island gourmet kitchen. Large 
units! 

1/1... $1,115 
2/1... $1,136 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 


frUteam 

real estate 


RonJonthe Apt Mon 

FREE APT LOCATING 

Keeping Austin weirder one day at a time 

studios: $495 Water Paid close to 
downtown or 2 weeks Free 
$600 Heart of Austin 
78704 Fast Move In 

1 -1 $425 $99 Total Move In Jan 1 
$525 $99 Total Move In 
$530 2 Weeks free ez Qualifier 
$549 Resort Living Hot Tub 
Fitness, close to everything 
$559 Yes Private Patios 
and a fishable POND!!! 

$570 ALL BILLS PAID $99 ? o 

Total Move in LOFT 

2-1 $570 $99 total Move In Avail ? o 
Jan 1 st 



$575 $99 Total Move in 
Avail Jan 1 st 

$599 Washer Dryer Conns 


$641 free cable bus rt 

close to downtown 

$700 Hardwood floors 78704 


3-2 $799 Washer Dryer Conns 
3-2 $861 1200 Sq Ft 
Free Cable Bus Rt 


CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS! 

Specializing in immediate move-in’s, cheap rent & difficult 
situations. No credit, bad credit, 1st time renters, co-signers 
no problem, mon!! Fast, Friendly & Best of ALL FREE! 

www.ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

512 / 293-7443 



We know Austin. 

Unique apartments, lofts, and downtown 
condos for sale and lease. If it’s out there, 
we can show it. 


SALES / LEASING 


STiNCOOL.COM 


#579334 

Rentals • locating 

Mike MacLaggan, Broker 



“Notadouchebag 

512- 
669- 
-8269 




* AustinRealList.com* 




* 

■¥ 

■¥ 

Same Day Ray 

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Call Ray Day 496"3725 bluewateraustin.com 

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Call Today. Look Today. Lease Today. 

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IMMED. MOVE-INS , 1 ST TIME RENTERS , 

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HOUSES £ DUPLEXES , BIG DOCS , 



BAD CREDIT £ BROKEN LEASES 


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South/Central 

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iB $525 Wood floors, 670sqft, walk to downtown 


■¥ 

iB $425 iMonth Free, 555sqft 

■¥ 

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2B $600 wood floors, bike to downtown 


■¥ 

2-2 $575 iMonth Free, Cheap Rent! 

■¥ 

jiff 

2-2 $720 Wood floors i026sqft, free trash/water 

-¥■ 


3-2 House $1195 1 st time for lease 


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North/Central 


4:< 

iB $4 97 Wood floors, salt water pool. 

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iB $580 676 sqft w/d, Great location! 

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2-2 $750 i036sqft w/d-big as a house 


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2B $850 True gem, walk to light rail. 

<£z 



seventh heaven 
on sixth. 


1616 W. 6th St. 


Town Lake and greenbelt trails ri^ 
outside your doorstep. 

Amenities 

INCLUDE: 

•pool 

•gas/cable paid 
• parkviews 
available 
•onsite laundry 


^ * W 6th 


TOWN LAKE _ 
cs 
E 

cs 


•recently renovated 
•pets welcome! 

1/1 S TO $795 
2/1 S TO $1050 

( 512 ) 499-8013 


W 


Pictures, Floorplans and more at 

www.wsgaustin.com 


jbt 

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austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 95 




OPEN HOUSE NOV. 19 





NEW CONSTRUCTION 
3 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath, 
1,988 Sq ft 
Close to Downtown, 
University of Texas, 
& MLK Metro Station 
1700 Clifford, Austin, TX 78702 
Urban Living for Only $349,900 


Daphne Gilbert Owner/Realtor 
Casa Grande Realty * 51 2 - 41 3-4490 


NORTH CAMPUS 
LARGE 1/1 ABP $775! 


Available Jan 13. 
Electric, Water, Trash, paid, 
Microwave, onsite laundry. 
3011 Whitis 
(30th & Guadalupe) 


LOCALLY OWNED & MANAGED BY 

Ilf A | |f%U PROPERTIES, INC. 
WAUUn 512-451-0988 



Vintage Travis Heights/78704 
Near Stacy Park, small courtyard community, most bills 
paid, 1/1 $685, 2/2 $875, Hardwood floors! 

Riverside 

Wood floors special! 1/1 $525, 2/2 $650. Ready for move-in! 

78704/South Lamar 
Near Broken Spoke, large private patio! 

1/1 $821, 2/1 $989. 

Eastside/Riverside 
Free Wifi! Newly remodeled, one exit to downtown. 

2/1 $760. 

Zilker Park complete remodel 
Price drop! Studio $708. 1 bedroom $811. 2 bedroom 
$980. Gas cooking! 

Eastside/Manor Rd 

Hardwood floors, small courtyard, 1/1 $699. 2/1 $809. 

Riverside, 1 Exit to Downtown 
Studio $495, 1 bedroom $565, 2 bedroom $715. 
Hardwood Floors! 

Modern Loft 

Stainless appliances, granite counter tops, walk to 
Whole Foods, 1/1 $1438, 2/2 $2973. 

Rare Zilker Park 

Complete remodel, W/D in all units, 1/1 $1010, 

2 bedroom $1141. 

Oltorf, Near Downtown 
1/1 $559, 2/2 $749, Large private decks! 

We have 1000s of listings for lease 
throughout Central Austin! Call for show! 

team real estate 

L^i 512.416.8333 
www.austindowntownliving.com 


APARTMENT/ 
CONDO <ont. 


CENTRAL 

$525-$650 Studios To 1 bed- 
rooms in Hyde Park 
ALL DAY LONG LIKE CHEECH 
AND CHONG 
CALL ME... 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 

512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 


CENTRAL 693-7231 
AustinCool.com Town Lake 3 
bedroom! Open design, large 
equal-sized bedrooms, canoe 
and kayak storage, right off 
hike-and-bike trail, $1,478. 


Xew 


CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Barton Hills/Zilker. 
Quiet dead-end street. Cute 
and clean large 1/1 with large 
patio, wooded view, lots of 
windows, W/D! $865. 


CENTRAL 

RIVERSIDE 
WOOD FLOORS - 
NEAR DOWNTOWN! 

Recent remodel, all tile and 
wood flooring, water/wastwa- 
ter/trash paid. 
STUDIO... $495 
1/1 ...$555 
2/2 $715 

CALL TEAM REAL ESTATE 
FOR SHOW 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

tot team 

real estate 


CENTRAL 

ZILKER PARK 
50 FT TO HIKE-AND- 
BIKE TRAIL 
PRICE DROP! 

STUDIO... $708 
1/1... $811 
2/1... $980 

New remodel. Gas cooking. 
Modern lighting. Wood floor 
accents. 

Greenbelt access. 

1 exit to downtown! 

(pet & bicycle friendly) 

Call Team Real Esate for 
show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

t^fteam 

real estate 


CENTRAL Live on 6th St for 
$775! Free parking, Cable, 
Gas, Trash paid. All units 
remodeled. 1-1 den $850. 
www.apartmentlocating.com 
692-4525 


CENTRAL 

AustinCool.com 

(512)693-7231 
360 LOFT 

West Downtown Luxury! 
Concierge, rooftop pool 
Nightlife at your Doorstep! 

AUSTINCOOL.COM 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 


CENTRAL 

78704/LAMAR NEAR 

BROKEN SPOKE 

1/1... $821 
2/2... $1,309 

Washer/Dryer included. South 
Central backs to Greenbelt. 
Direct hike-and-bike trail 
access. Near downtown. 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

t^fteam 

real estate 


CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Heart of SoCo, 
modern open design. W/D 
included, bright with high 
ceilings, large windows. Walk- 
in closet, walk downtown. 
Includes cable and valet trash, 
$1,261. 


CENTRAL AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Shore Condo Lofts, 
live downtown but on the 
quieter side. Steps away from 
Town Lake trail and Lady Bird 
Lake. Walking distance to 
everything downtown! 603 
Davis St. 78701. 


Vi fc ir 


CENTRAL Live on Lady Bird 
Lake! Be right in the middle 
of it all. Hike and bike trail 
at your back door! This is a 
downtown gem. $703 512-692- 
4525 AALocating. 


EAST 

EASTSIDE/ 
MANOR RD 

Small courtyard community, 
gas cooking, wood floors, 
free Wi-Fi! 

1/1... $699 
2/1... $809 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

foTteam 

real estate 


METRO 

4bedrooms 
$1 099-$1 600 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 


512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 


NORTH Eft Apt 
furnished, utilities, cable/wifi, 
no kids/pets. 1 year lease, 
$200 dep. $600/mo. Refer- 
ences req. 183/Duval 
512-258-8476 


NORTH CENTRAL 

Bang 4 Your Burk! 

1 bed - $545 676 
sq. ft. 

1 bed - $575 725 

sq. ft. 

2 bed -$710 1025 

sq ft. 

2 bed townhome 
$735 1204 S.f. 

All units W/D Conn. 

Blue Water Realty 
(512) 496-3725 

NORTH CENTRAL 

Hardwood floors $505! ! ! 
Great downtown access. 
Best kept secret in Austin. 
This will be a short termed 
special on a great apartment 
so call soon! 1-1 $505, 2-2 
$714. 231-9888. www.apart- 
mentlocating.com 

NORTH/CENTRAL 

2 Bedroom 
$650 2/2 W/D conns. 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 
512-293-7443 
ronjontheapartment- 
mon.com 

NORTHEAST 

WORKS WITH EVIC- 
TIONS! 

Eft- $399 
1 bed- $499 
2 bed- $599 

CALL TODAY, LOOK 
TODAY, LEASE TODAY! 
SAME DAY RAY 496-3725 


NORTHWEST Heavily 
wooded, close to shopping 
and major employers, 1-1.5 
Townhouse with enclosed 
patio, $775. W/D Conn, Fitness 
Center, Tennis Courts, and 
Boat parking. 512-231-9888 
agent. 

www.apartmentlocating.com 

NORTHWEST $435 Jr 1 BR. 
2/2.5 $735 3/2 $889, Best 
price per sq ft in Austin! 
512-231-9888 

www.apartmentlocating.com 

SOUTH 

3-2 House $1195 
Live in a quaint 
neighborhood that is set off 
on its own. No neighbors 
behind you & one block from 
your own private park. Barely 
lived in south Austin home 
& first time for lease. Fenced 
backyard yard and patio area 
with custom stone work. This 
spacious 3 bedroom, 2 
bathroom home has an 
attached garage with 
workshop area that is perfect 
for you and your family. This 
home is located in a quiet 
family-friendly neighborhood 
and is minutes away from 
Southpark Meadows 
shopping center. 

Raymond Day 
Blue Water Realty 
(512) 496-3725 
www.bluewateraustin.com 


SOUTH Available South rent- 
als: William Cannon 1/1 $545, 
S. Lamar 1/1 $575, Ben White 
1/1 $575. Call Rick ©447- 
RENT with Properties Plus. 


SOUTH 

Oak Creek Village wait list for 
1 and 2 bedroom sized units 
are closed at this time due to 
the excessive number of appli- 
cants currently on the list. 

SOUTH 

3bed rooms 

$799 W/D connections, close 
to IH 35 

$1 ,000 Gas Cooking, Bus 
Route, 2 Minutes from 
Downtown. 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 

512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

SOUTH 

Wake up fishing or having cof- 
fee around your private Pond. 
Fitness room 
Cascading pools 
Close to down town 
Private patios 
Washer/Dryer connections 
$559 - $799 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 
512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

SOUTH 

ARTIST/MUSICIAN- 

FRIENDLY 

COMMUNITY 

Warehouse-style apartment, 
polished concrete floor, 
exposed metal accents, gas 
cooking, modern lighting. 

1/1... $659 
2/2... $779 

Call Team Real Estate 
for show! 

(512)416-8333 

austindowntownliving.com 

l^Tteam 

real estate 

Xew 


SOUTH 

$99 Total Moves U ini! Avail- 
able Jan 1st. 

Bathroom outside bedroom 
On bus route 
Close to restaurants 

1 Bedroom from $425 

2 Bedroom from $575 

Ron Jon 
Apt Mon 
512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 

SOUTH AustinCool.com 
693-7231 Free cable with HBO 
& internet. Big dogs OK! 
Saltwater pool, $670. 


SOUTH AustinCool.com 
693-7231 South Congress 
shaded by 1 00 year old oaks, 
tranquil pool & tennis courts. 
Full size W/D included. 1/1 
$750, 2/2 $925. 


AiPir 


SOUTH AustinCool .com 
693-7231 Greenbelt trail at 
door, W/D incl, walk to shops/ 
cafes-cool 78704 $845. 


SOUTH CENTRAL Large 779 
sqft 1/1 in quaint community 
right on South Congress, Pool, 
Laundry, Wood in select units. 
No weight limit on pets! $699. 
ApartmentExperts 200-7566 


SOUTH CENTRAL Live on 
Town Lake less than 1 mile 
from downtown! 1/1 for $830/ 
mo! Fitness Center, Tanning 
Beds. Lake view swimming 
pool and views from select 
units! ApartmentExperts 
200-7566 


SOUTH CENTRAL Wooded 
community minutes from 
Downtown! Free cable, pool, 
jacuzzi, trails and more! 
Convenient access to the 
highway! 1/1 $785. Apartmen- 
tExperts 200-7566 


SOUTH CENTRAL Live the 
SOLA lifestyle! Walk to 78704 
dining and entertainment! 
W/D in the unit! Two pools 
and a jacuzzi! Club room and 
fitness center! Hike and Bike 
trail straight to Zilker Park! 

1/1 $870. ApartmentExperts 
200-7566 


SOUTH CENTRAL Live right 
on the Barton Creek Green- 
belt! Short walk to Zilker Park! 
Greenbelt views in select 
units. Tennis, volleyball, resort 
style pool, fitness center, all 
with convenient access to 
290 and Mopac! Studio $760. 
ApartmentExperts 200-7566 


SOUTH/CENTRAL 

1 Bedroom $549 

2 Bedroom $699 
Resort style pool, 

Hot tub, 

Fitness room, 

Bus route on property, 
Fast Move- 1 ns 

Ron Jon-Broker 
512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 


SOUTH/CENTRAL 

Free Cable is back!!! 
Skate and City Park close by 
Bus Routes on property 
Two sparkling pools 
Onsite laundry 
That’s right 2-1 ’s from $641 

Ron Jon-Broker 
512-293-7443 

aptmon@hotmail.com 

ronjontheapartmentmon.com 


SOUTHEAST Minutes to 
Downtonwn, 1/1 $470, 2/1 
$575. Water paid, gated, pool. 
Call Rick 447-7368, Properties 
Plus. 


SOUTHWEST 

AustinCool.com 

(512)693-7231 
UPSCALE 1/1 $755 
2/2 $905 
3 BDRM $1220 

with W/D connections, indoor 
full-size basketball court, huge 
fitness center with classes. 
Sunset Valley area 

AUSTINCOOL.COM 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PROPERTIES 


SOUTHWEST Austincool. 
com 693-7231 Heavily wooded 
and hilly park setting, large 
decks overlooking Barton 
Creek greenbelt. Big dogs! 
Earthy setting, remodeled 
kitchens, Studio $742. 


WEST 

For Rent & Sale! 
Houses 
Duplexes 
Apartments 
Lofts & Condos 
Blue Water Realty 
(512) 496-3725 


PUPIEX/HOUSES 


CENTRAL Classic Pember- 
ton! Spacious 2/1 duplex, 
wonderful hardwoods, lots of 
windows, covered parking, big 
kitchen, big bedrooms, W/D 
connections, quiet neighbors. 
Cats welcome (NO dogs). 
$1,250. 1713-B Summit View 
(1 block north of Enfield). 
Matthews Properties, Rollo 
731-6799, matthewsproper- 
ties@yahoo.com 


CENTRAL Tarrytown - 
Gigantic 1/1 in 4-plex, Plain 
Jane exterior, wooden floors, 
large common yard area 
for gardens or just relaxing 
under the trees, windows 
everywhere, large kitchen, NO 
W/D connections, no laundry, 
window a/c’s. Cats welcome! 

- NO DOGS EVER! $850. 2302 
Enfield. Matthews Properties, 
Rollo 731-6799, matthewsprop- 
erties@yahoo.com 


NORTH CENTRAL 

$99 On 1st Month! 
Works w/ Bad Credit 
& 1st Time Renters 
IB- $480- 
wood floors 
1b- $550- 
W/D Conn 
2B- $650 
Vaulted Ceilings 

Blue Water Realty 
(512) 496-3725 

NORTHEAST 13512 
Stephanie Saint John St. 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, 1 office. 
$1,600 a month. Send email to 
thomglpn@gmail.com. 


SOUTH List of available 
duplexes & homes. Quick & 
courteous Realtor. Call Rick @ 
447-7368 w/Properties Plus 


ROOMMATES 


EAST $470 Sublet, All Bills 
Paid, Free Internet, Free Cable, 
Furnished, Private Bathroom, 

I have two Male roommates, 
LGBT friendly, Females are 
ok, Free gym, pool, Gated, 
Contact: (51 2)-750-851 8 or 
colbgrr@yahoo.com 


METRO ROOMMATES.COM. 
Browse hundreds of online 
listings with photos and 
maps. Find your roommate 
with a click of the mouse! 
Visit: http://www.Roommates. 
com. (AAN CAN) 


SOUTH Roommates needed. 
Own room. All bills Paid+ free 
cable/internet. Washer/dryer 
Nice apartments with pool, 
fitness, computer center. UT 
Shuttle and Cap Metro stops. 
www.urbanaustinliving.com 
694.3899 


96 the AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 








SOUTH $447 ABP with 
private bath. Get your own 
room with private bath and 
walkin closet. Laminate 
flooring @ $453 Get all bills 
paid + internet/cable in 
your room. Washer/dryer. 
Nice apartment commu- 
nity with pool, fitness, tan- 
ning and gates. Must pass 
credit (no broken leases)/ 
criminal background 
check. No felonies, certain 
misdemeanors like as- 
saults, family violence, etc. 
$437 $0 deposit 694.3899 
Agent for the apartments. 


FOR SALE 


BASTROP CO. OPEN 
HOUSE- 11/19:11-4. 202 
Main St., Smithville. 
Unique historic home 
& retail space in one! 
Single-story loft, 
2500sq.ft, carport, yard, 
skylights, claw foot tub. 
$175,000,512-581-1598 


CEDAR PARK 

AustinCool.com/sales 

SEARCH 11,000 
AUSTIN SALES 
LISTINGS! 
FREE BUYER RER 
(512) 693-7231 
AUSTINC00L.C0N 

AUSTIN 

COOL 

PRO PE HI IES 


CENTRAL 

DOWNTOWN LOFT 
EXPERTS 

Starting at $1 90K! 
Wood, stainless appliances 
& more! 

(512)693-7231 

All downtown listings at: 
AustinCool.com/sales 

AUSTINCOOL.COM 

LAKE MEDINA Liquida- 
tion of lots in gated sub- 
division at Lake Medina, 
bad credit no credit OK, 

3 lots available Hurry! 
830-460-8354 Guaranteed 
financing, WSE available 


NORTH Very nice! 3/2/2 
near 183/McNeil, new/ 
roof, new/ac, fresly/ 
painted inside/outside 
and new/flooring. Pos- 
sible owner/finance 30k/ 
down, $144k 956-266-9692. 


SERVICES 


AGENT, LICENSED 

Looking for some Austin- 
style real estate agents 
that understand how to 
play. Whether you’re just 
getting your license, or a 
seasoned pro, you under- 
stand that in Austin you 
don’t need a big corporate 
brand to succeed, you 
just have to speak local. 
Born and raised Austinite 
Broker would love to work 
with motivated folks who 
need less direction and 
more money. Plently of 
resources to help you 
succeed. Let me know if 
this sounds like it may fit 
your style. 

512-669-8269 austinreallist 
@gmail.com. Broker, 
#0579334 


CLOTHING/ 

JEWELRY 


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to 8 

s $ 

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• — I 

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8 


APPAREL 

GOTH • PUNK • T-SHIRTS 

Clothing, stickers, patches, 
pins, jewelry, corsets. 

• 1905 S. 1st. • 

• www.secretoktober.com • 
462-9217 


COMPUTERS/ 

ELECTRONICS 


CELLPHONES NMORE 

Cellphone SALES FLASHING, 
UNLOCK, AND REPAIR. Any 
phone, or carrier. Electronics, 
Tazers, we got it. Cheap Auto 
Liab Insurance $39. 537-7705 


GENERAL 


CRAFTS BAZAAR Sat. 

Nov 19, 9-4. 2900 Slaughter 
Lane (behind Shell) Westoak 
Woods Baptist Church. Free 
entry, prizes gifts, food, toys, 42 
vendors. Funds service proj- 
ects. westoak.org 


LOST & FOUND 


Looking for William (Bill) 
Bagley. Anyone who has see 
Bill since May of last year, 
please let me know. He has 
family and friends who are 
worried about him. Thanks, 
Leo, 512-461-9513 or leobuis@ 
yahoo.com 


PETS/PET 

SUPPLIES 


MOTOR 


0 ^ 

A 


1988 CHEVY Silverado 1500 
Long bed, new AC system, 
tow package, runs and drives 
great. Miles 166k- Truck is 
amazingly clean and straight. 
$2450. Warranty available. 
Auto Depot 909 
Prairie Trail 836-9767. www. 
autodepotaustin.com 

1991 TOYOTA Corolla Only 
82k miles, AT, being readied, 1 
year warranty.$2450. 

Auto Depot 909 

Prairie Trail 836-9767. www. 

autodepotaustin.com 

2002 CHRYSLER PT touring 
cruiser very, very nice. $5650. 
Warranty 

Auto Depot 909 Prairie Trail. 
836-9767. www.autodepotaus- 
tin.com 

2003 VOLKSWAGEN GTI 

5 sp., leather. Very very 
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LEGAL 

A & R Organization 
LLC, Alejandro Torres, 
CEO, Dba The Cigar 
Room is 

making application 
with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commision for a 
Mixed Beverage 
Permit and Mixed 
Beverage Late hours 
on the address of 
1310 RR620 Ste 
A-12, Lakeway, Travis 
County Texas. 

Application has been 
made with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for a 
Mixed Beverage/ Late 
Night Permit by Chase 
Offshore Corporation 
Ltd dba Wild West, 
to be located at 401 
E. Whitestone Blvd, 

Ste B100, Cedar Park, 
Williamson County, 
Texas. Officers of said 
corporation are Kate J 
Kesler, Pres., 0 Wayne 
Morris, Secretary. 



CAUSE NO. C-1- 
PB-1 1-000209 NOTICE TO 
ALL PERSONS HAVING 
CLAIMS AGAINST THE 
ESTATE OF RITA B. MOORE 
Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Rita B. Moore, 
Deceased, were issued on 
November 8, 201 1 , in Cause 
Number C-1-PB-1 1-000209, 
pending in the Probate Court 
Number One of Travis County, 
Texas, to: 

Sondra Moore 
The residence of such 
Independent Administrator is 
in Travis County, Texas. The 
address: 

6305 Thurgood Avenue 
Austin, Texas 78721 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate, which is 
currently being administered, 
are required to present them 
to Sondra Moore, Independent 
Administrator of the Estate of 
Rita B. Moore, at the office of 
Joel B. Bennett, PC., 316 W. 
12th Street, Suite 101 , Austin, 
Texas 78701. 

Dated the 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011. 

By: /s/ Catalina E. Cantu 
Attorney for Sondra Moore 


CITATION BY PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS TO 

ALL PERSONS INTERESTED 
IN THE ESTATE OF LANCE 
LAMAR SHOCKLEY aka 
LANCE SHOCKLEY Deceased, 
No. C-1-PB-11-001834 in 
Probate Court Number One of 
Travis County, Texas. 

BRIAN SHOCKLEY and all The 
alleged heir(s) at law in the 
above numbered and entitled 
estate, filed on November 
09, 2011, an Application to 
Declare Heirship and for Issu- 
ance of Letters of Independent 
Administration in the said 
estate and request(s) that said 
Court determine who are the 
heirs and only heirs of the said 
LANCE LAMAR SHOCKLEY 
aka LANCE SHOCKLEY, 
Deceased, and their respective 
shares and interests in such 
estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court at 
10:00 o’clock a.m. on the first 
Monday next after the expira- 
tion of ten days from date of 
publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a writ- 
ten answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND 
AND THE SEAL OF SAID 
COURT at office in Travis 
County, Texas, on November 
09, 2011. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
RO. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/O. RUIZ 


CITATION BY PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS TO 

ALL PERSONS INTERESTED 
IN THE ESTATE OF JOSE 
PILAR CHAVEZ Deceased, No. 
C-1-PB-1 1-001809 in Probate 
Court Number One of Travis 
County, Texas. 

GUILLERMINA MATA CHAVEZ 
and all The alleged heir(s) at 
law in the above numbered 
and entitled estate, filed 
on November 03, 201 1 , an 
Application to Determine 
Heirship in the said estate and 
request(s) that said Court de- 
termine who are the heirs and 
only heirs of the said JOSE 
PILAR CHAVEZ, Deceased, 
and their respective shares 
and interests in such estate. 
Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court at 
10:00 o’clock a.m. on the first 
Monday next after the expira- 
tion of ten days from date of 
publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a writ- 
ten answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND 
AND THE SEAL OF SAID 
COURT at office in Travis 
County, Texas, on November 
04, 2011. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
RO. Box 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/O. RUIZ 


CITATION BY PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS 

TO GARY BRESEE and TO ALL 
PERSONS INTERESTED IN 
THE ESTATE OF NEIL 
JEROME HAEFNER Deceased, 
No. C-1-PB-09-001284 in 
Probate Court Number One of 
Travis County, Texas. 

KARA BACHMAN and all The 
alleged heir(s) at law in the 
above numbered and entitled 
estate, filed on July 6, 2011, 
an Amended Application to 
Determine Heirship in the 
said estate and request(s) that 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of the 
said NEIL JEROME HAEFNER, 
Deceased, and their respective 
shares and interests in such 
estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court at 
10:00 o’clock a.m. on the first 
Monday next after the expira- 
tion of ten days from date of 
publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a writ- 
ten answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND 
AND THE SEAL OF SAID 
COURT at office in Travis 
County, Texas, on October 
06,2011. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
RO. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/O. RUIZ 


CITATION BY PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS TO 

ALL PERSONS INTERESTED 
IN THE ESTATE OF GODFREY 
O. CHIMA Deceased, No. 
C-1-PB-1 1-000626 in Probate 
Court Number One of Travis 
County, Texas. MERCY CHIMA 
The alleged heir(s) at law 
in the above numbered and 
entitled estate, filed on APRIL 
15, 2011, an Application to 
Determine Heirship in the 
said estate and request(s) that 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of the 
said GODFREY O. CHIMA, 
Deceased, and their respective 
shares and interests in such 
estate. 

Said application will be heard 
and acted on by said Court at 
10:00 o’clock a.m. on the first 
Monday next after the expira- 
tion of ten days from date of 
publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse in 
Travis County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court at said above mentioned 
time and place by filing a writ- 
ten answer contesting such 
application should they desire 
to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 

GIVEN UNDER MY HAND 
AND THE SEAL OF SAID 
COURT at office in Travis 
County, Texas, on JUNE 15, 
2011. 

Dana DeBeauvoir 
County Clerk, 

Travis County, Texas 
RO. BOX 149325 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78714-9325 
By Deputy: /s/ ABRAM 
GONZALEZ 


austinchronkle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 97 





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LEGAL/ 

NOTICES tont. 

CITATION BY PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS 
COUNTY OF WILLIAMSON 

TO ALL PERSONS INTER- 
ESTED IN THE ESTATE OF 
PAUL WAYNE OSBORNE, 
Cause No. 11-0615-CP4, in 
County Court at Law #4 
of Williamson County, 405 
Martin Luther King Street, 
Georgetown, Txas 78626. 
DONNA L. OSBORNE, Appli- 
cant in the above determined 
and entitled estate, filed 
on the 13th day of October, 
2011 an APPLICATION TO 
DETERMINE HEIRSHIP of the 
said estate and requests that 
the said Court determine who 
are the heirs and only heirs 
of the said PAUL WAYNE 
OSBORNE, Deceased, and 
their respective shares and 
interests in such estate. 

Said application may be 
heard at 10:00 o’clock a.m. 
on or after the first Monday 
next after the expiration of 
ten days from the date of 
publication of this citation, 
at the County Courthouse 
in Georgetown, Williamson 
County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honorable 
Court on or before above 
mentioned time and place 
by filing a written answer 
contesting such application 
should they desire to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after the date 
of its issuance, it shall be 
returned unserved. 

Issued and given under my 
hand and seal of office at 
Georgetown, Texas, this the 
13th day of October, 2011. 
Nancy E. Rister 
Williamson County Clerk 
405 MLK Street, Box 14 
Georgetown, TX 78626 
By: /s/ C. Dawson, Deputy 
Applicant’s Attorney: 

TERRY DAVIS 
201 S. BELLBLVD., 

SUITE 101 

CEDAR PARK, TX 78613 


CITATION BY 
PUBLICATION THE STATE 
OF TEXAS 

COUNTY OF WILLIAMSON 

TO ALL PERSONS INTER- 
ESTED IN THE ESTATE OF 
MEAGAN AUDREY ALLEN, 
DECEASED, Cause No. 11- 
0633-CP4, in County Court at 
Law #4 of Williamson County, 
405 Martin Luther King Street, 
Georgetown, Texas 78626. 
ANGELA KANDIS, Applicant 
in the above numbered 
and entitled estate, filed 
on the 21st day of October, 
2011, an APPLICATION TO 
DETERMINE HEIRSHIR FOR 
INDEPENDENT ADMINIS- 
TRATION, AND LETTERS OF 
ADMINISTRATION of the said 
estate and request(s) that the 
said Court determine who are 
the heirs and only heirs of 
the said MEAGAN AUDREY 
ALLEN, DECEASED, and 
their respective shares and 
interests in such estate. 

Said application may be 
heard at 10:00 o’clock a.m. on 
the first Monday next after the 
expiration of ten days from 
the date of publication of this 
citation, at the County Court- 
house Annex in Georgetown, 
Williamson County, Texas. 

All persons interested in said 
estate are hereby cited to 
appear before said Honor- 
able Court at said above 
mentioned time and place 
by filing a written answer 
contesting such application 
should they desire to do so. 

If this citation is not served 
within 90 days after date of its 
issuance, it shall be returned 
unserved. 


Given under my hand and the 
seal of office at Georgetown, 
Texas, this the 21st day of 
October, 2011. 

Nancy E. Rister 
Williamson County Clerk 
405 MLK Street, Box 14 
Georgetown, TX 78626 
By: /s/ S Perdue, Deputy 
Applicant’s Attorney: 

MARTIN CIRKIEL 

1901 E PALM VALLEY BLVD 

ROUND ROCK TX 78664 


CITATION BY 
PUBLICATION 
THE STATE OF TEXAS 
CAUSE NO: D-1- 
FM-1 1-006228 To: BONFILIO 
TIBURCIO TOLEDO and 
to all who it may concern, 
Respondent(s); GREETINGS: 
YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. You 
may employ an attorney. If 
you or your attorney do not 
file a written answer with the 
clerk who issued this citation 
by 10:00 A.M. on the Monday 
next following the expiration 
of twenty days after you were 
served this citation and peti- 
tion, a default judgment may 
be taken against you. 

YOU ARE HEREBY COM- 
MANDED to appear and 
answer before the Honor- 
able District Court, 261 ST 
JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT 
Travis County, Texas, at the 
Courthouse of said County in 
Austin, Texas, at or before 10 
o’clock A.M. of the Monday 
next after expiration of twenty 
days from the date of service 
of this citation, then and there 
to answer the filed in said 
court on, and said suit being 
number D-1-FM-1 1-006228 on 
the docket of said Court, and 
entitled “IN THE MATTER OF 
THE MARRIAGE OF MARIA 
ARROYO and BONFILIO 
TIBURCIO-TOLEDO, ETAL, 
and In the Interest of , CHILD". 
The nature of said suit is a 
request to DISSOLVE the 
marriage of the parties, ap- 
point managing and posses- 
sory conservators, and divide 
the estate of the parties in a 
manner that the court deems 
just and right. 

The Court has authority in this 
suit to enter any judgment or 
decree in the CHILD’S interest 
which will be binding on you, 
including the termination of 
the parent-child relationship, 
the determination of paternity, 
and the appointment of a 
conservator with authority to 
consent to the CHILD’S adop- 
tion. The Court has authority 
in this suit to enter any judg- 
ment or decree dissolving the 
marriage and providing for the 
division of property that will 
be binding on you. 

Issued and given under 
my hand and the seal of 
said court at Austin, Texas, 
November 04, 2011. 

AMALIA RODRIGUEZ- 
MENDOZA 

Travis County District Clerk 
Travis County Courthouse 
1000 Guadalupe, 

PO. Box 679003 (78767) 
Austin, Texas 78701 
By/s/ JON SANDERS, Deputy 
REQUESTED BY: 

JACK WAYNE CUNNINGHAM 
PO. BOX 17305 
AUSTIN, TX 78760 
BUSINESS PHONE: (512) 
565-5820 

FAX: (512) 501-2841 


D-1-GV-09-001939 
CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 126th District Court 
of Travis County, on the 
10th day of October, 2011 in 
a certain cause numbered 
D-1-GV-09-001 939, wherein 
City of Lago Vista, Lago Vista 
Independent School District, 
Lago Vista Independent 
School District-County Edu- 
cation District, Travis County, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 and 
Travis County Healthcare 
District d/b/a Central Health 
are plaintiffs, and Gentry 
Investments and Lauterborn 


Homes, Inc. (In Rem Only), 
if active and if inactive, the 
unknown owners, assigns, 
successors, and heirs of the 
Estate of Gentry Investments 
and Lauterborn Homes, Inc. 
(In Rem Only), JPMorgan 
Chase Bank, N.A. f/k/a 
Bank One, N.A. f/k/a Bank 
One, Texas, N.A. f/k/a Team 
Bank f/k/a Bank of the Hills 
(In Rem Only), and City of 
Lago Vista (In Rem Only) 
are defendant(s), in favor of 
said plaintiffs, for the sum of 
$6,670.15 Dollars, together 
with all costs of suit, that 
being the amount of judg- 
ment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 126th District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on March 28, 2011. 

I, on the 24th day of October, 
2011, at 2:00 o’clock PM., 
have levied upon, and will, 
on the 6th day of December, 
201 1 at 1 0:00 o’ clock, A.M., 
at 1000 Guadalupe Street in 
the City of Austin, within legal 
hours, proceed to sell for 
cash to the highest bidder, all 
the rights, title and interest 
of defendants in and to the 
following described property, 
levied upon as the property of 
defendants, to-wit: 

Unit 8-A, Building A, Lago 
Vista Lodges Condomini- 
ums, Condo. Records 8/542 
as described in document 
number 2001139088 of the 
deed records of Travis 
County, Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be 
made by me to satisfy the 
above described judgment 
for $6,670.15 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 24th 
day of October, 2011. 

BRUCE ELFANT, 

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Alan Redd DEPUTY 
ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WAR- 
RANTIES, EXPRESS OR 
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, 

BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE 
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF 
MERCHANTABILITY AND 
FITNESS FOR A PARTICU- 
LAR PURPOSE. YOU BUY 
THE PROPERTY “AS IS”. 
BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 0-000922 
CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 98TH District Court 
of Travis County, on the 
1 0th day of October, 2011 in 
a certain cause numbered 
D-1-GV-1 0-000922, wherein 
Travis County, Lago Vista 
Independent School District, 
Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 1 , Travis 
County Healthcare District 
d/b/a Central Health and City 
of Lago Vista are plaintiffs, 
and Jose Diaz, State of Texas/ 
Bond Forfeiture Section (In 
Rem Only) and United States 
of America-Internal Revenue 
Service (In Rem Only) are 
defendant(s), in favor of said 
plaintiffs, for the following 
sums: Tract One: Billing 
Number 61913 = $2,536.37 
and Tract Two: Billing 
Number 61918 = $24,475.41 
Dollars, together with all 
costs of suit, that being the 
amount of judgment recov- 
ered by the said plaintiffs, 
in the 98TH District Court 
of Travis County, Texas, on 
March 4, 2011. 

I, on the 24th day of October, 
2011, at 2:00 o’clock PM., 
have levied upon, and will, on 
the 6th day of December, 201 1 
at 10:00 o’ clock, A.M., 


at 1000 Guadalupe Street in 
the City of Austin, within legal 
hours, proceed to sell for 
cash to the highest bidder, all 
the rights, title and interest 
of defendants in and to the 
following described property, 
levied upon as the property of 
defendants, to-wit: 

TRACT ONE: BILLING NO.: 
061913 

Lot 7, Block K, Lago Vista 
Section 3, Phase 3, Plat No. 
30/40, Travis County, Texas, 
and being more particularly 
described in Document 
No. 2007018439 of the Deed 
Records of Travis County, 
Texas 

TRACT TWO: 061918 
Lot 12, Block K, Lago Vista 
Section 3, Phase 3, Plat No. 
30/40, Travis County, Texas, 
and being more particularly 
described in Document 
No. 2007018439 of the Deed 
Records of Travis County, 
Texas 

THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above 
described judgment for the 
following sums: Tract One: 
Billing Number 61913 = 
$2,536.37 and Tract Two: 
Billing Number 61918 = 
$24,475.41 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 24th 
day of October, 201 1 . 

BRUCE ELFANT, 

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Alan Redd DEPUTY 
ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WAR- 
RANTIES, EXPRESS OR 
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, 

BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE 
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF 
MERCHANTABILITY AND 
FITNESS FOR A PARTICU- 
LAR PURPOSE. YOU BUY 
THE PROPERTY “AS IS". 
BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 0-000937 
CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain 
Order Of Sale issued by the 
clerk of the 261 st District 
Court of Travis County, on 
the 12th day of October, 

2011 in a certain cause 
numbered D-1-GV-1 0-000937, 
wherein Travis County, Travis 
County Healthcare District 
d/b/a Central Health, Travis 
County Emergency Services 
District No. 1, Austin Com- 
munity College and Leander 
Independent School District 
are plaintiffs, and Rouzan 
Barton are defendant(s), in 
favor of said plaintiffs, for the 
following sums: Tract One: 
Billing Number 507490 = 
$8,336.87 and Tract Two: 
Billing Number 529529 = 
$16,573.87 Dollars, together 
with all costs of suit, that 
being the amount of judg- 
ment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 261st District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on July 26, 2011. 

I, on the 24th day of October, 
2011, at 2:00 o’clock PM., 
have levied upon, and will, 
on the 6th day of December, 
2011 at 10:00 o’ clock, A.M., 
at 1000 Guadalupe Street in 
the City of Austin, within legal 
hours, proceed to sell for 
cash to the highest bidder, all 
the rights, title and interest 
of defendants in and to the 
following described property, 
levied upon as the property of 
defendants, to-wit: 

Tract One: Billing Number: 
507490 

4 acres out of the Frank 
Inman Survey 554 as 


98 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 




described in Volume 11571, 
Page 1987 of the deed re- 
cords of Travis County, Texas 
Tract Two: Billing Number: 
529529 

7 acres out of the Frank 
Inman Survey 554 as 
described in Volume 12054, 
Page 338 of the deed records 
of Travis County, Texas 
THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above 
described judgment for the 
following sums: Tract One: 
Billing Number 507490 = 
$8,336.87 and Tract Two: 
Billing Number 529529 = 
$16,573.87 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 24th day 
of October, 201 1 . 

BRUCE ELFANT, 

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY /s/ Alan Redd DEPUTY 
ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIM- 
ITED TO, THE IMPLIED WAR- 
RANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 0-001 143 
CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 353rd District Court 
of Travis County, on the 24th 
day of October, 201 1 in a 
certain cause numbered D-1- 
GV-1 0-001 143, wherein Austin 
Community College, Austin 
Independent School District, 
Travis County, Travis County 
Emergency Services District 
No. 3 and Travis County 
Healthcare District are plain- 
tiffs, and Darleen Mueller, 
if alive and if deceased, the 
unknown owners, heirs, 
assigns and successors of 
the Estate of Darleen Mueller 
and Julius W. Mueller, Jr. are 
defendant(s), in favor of said 
plaintiffs, for the following 
sums: Tract One: Billing 
Number 471447 = $4,255.48 
and Tract Two: Billing 
Number 163514 = $11,025.30 
Dollars, together with all costs 
of suit, that being the amount 
of judgment recovered by the 
said plaintiffs, in the 353es 
District Court of Travis County, 
Texas, on February 8, 201 1 . 

I, on the 25th day of October, 
201 1 , at 2:00 o’clock PM., have 
levied upon, and will, on the 
6th day of December, 201 1 at 
10:00 o’ clock, A.M., at 1000 
Guadalupe Street in the City 
of Austin, within legal hours, 
proceed to sell for cash to the 
highest bidder, all the rights, 
title and interest of defendants 
in and to the following de- 
scribed property, levied upon 
as the property of defendants, 
to-wit: 

Tract One: Billing Number 
471447 

.327 of an acre out of the 

J. R. Morgan Sur. 56 (called 
A.W. Nichols Sur. Indeed) 
as described in Volume 8787, 
Page 332 of the deed records 
of Travis County, Texas 
Tract Two: Billing Number 
163514 

.15 of an acre out of the J.R. 
Morgan Sur. 56 and the W.P. 
Baxter Sur. 58 as described 
in document number 
2000067938 of the deed re- 
cords of Travis County, Texas 


THE ABOVE SALE to be made 
by me to satisfy the above 
described judgment for the 
following sums: Tract One: 
Billing Number 471447 = 
$4,255.48 and Tract Two: 
Billing Number 163514 = 
$11,025.30 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 25th day 
of October, 201 1 . 

BRUCE ELFANT, 

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY/s/ G.L. Blaylock DEPUTY 
ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIM- 
ITED TO, THE IMPLIED WAR- 
RANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS". BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


D-1-GV-1 0-001 433 
CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

Y VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 250th District Court 
of Travis County, on the 12th 
day of October, 2011 in a 
certain cause numbered D-1- 
GV-10-001433, wherein Austin 
Independent School District, 
City of Austin, Travis County, 
Travis County Healthcare Dis- 
trict d/b/a Central Health and 
Austin Community College 
are plaintiffs, and Sherwin 
Buydens are defendant(s), 
in favor of said plaintiffs, for 
the sum of $14,759.66 Dollars, 
together with all costs of suit, 
that being the amount of judg- 
ment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 250th District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on February 11, 2011. 

I, on the 24th day of October, 
2011, at 2:00 o’clock PM., have 
levied upon, and will, on the 
6th day of December, 201 1 at 
10:00 o’ clock, A.M., at 1000 
Guadalupe Street in the City 
of Austin, within legal hours, 
proceed to sell for cash to the 
highest bidder, all the rights, 
title and interest of defendants 
in and to the following de- 
scribed property, levied upon 
as the property of defendants, 
to-wit: 

Lot A, Resubdivision of 
Lots 24 & 25, Block A, MSZ 
Addition Amended, Plat No. 
66/26, Travis County, Texas, 
and being more particularly 
described in document num- 
ber 2007191168 of the deed 
records of Travis County, 
Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be 
made by me to satisfy the 
above described judgment 
for $14,759.66 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 24th day 
of October, 201 1 . 

BRUCE ELFANT, 

CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY/s/ Alan Redd DEPUTY 


ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIM- 
ITED TO, THE IMPLIED WAR- 
RANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


GV-003140 

CONSTABLE’S NOTICE 
OF SALE 

REAL PROPERTY DELIN- 
QUENT TAXES 

BY VIRTUE of a certain Order 
Of Sale issued by the clerk 
of the 261 ST District Court of 
Travis County, on the 10th day 
of October, 2011 in a certain 
cause numbered GV-003140, 
wherein Austin Community 
College, Austin Independent 
School District, Travis County 
and Travis County Emergency 
Services District No. 3 are 
plaintiffs, and Thomas R 
McDill, Jr., United States of 
America (In Rem Only) and 
United States of America- 
Internal Revenue Service (In 
Rem Only) are defendant(s), 
in favor of said plaintiffs, for 
the sum of $14,473.16 Dollars, 
together with all costs of suit, 
that being the amount of judg- 
ment recovered by the said 
plaintiffs, in the 261ST District 
Court of Travis County, Texas, 
on March 5, 2002. 

I, on the 24th day of October, 
201 1 , at 2:00 o’clock PM., have 
levied upon, and will, on the 
6th day of December, 201 1 at 
10:00 o’ clock, A.M., at 1000 
Guadalupe Street in the City 
of Austin, within legal hours, 
proceed to sell for cash to the 
highest bidder, all the rights, 
title and interest of defendants 
in and to the following de- 
scribed property, levied upon 
as the property of defendants, 
to-wit: 

Lot 20, The Ridge at Thomas 
Springs, Plat No. 77/193 
as described in Volume 
13115, Page 2069 of the deed 
records of Travis County, 
Texas. 

THE ABOVE SALE to be 
made by me to satisfy the 
above described judgment 
for $14,473.16 Dollars in favor 
of plaintiffs, together with 
the costs of said suit, and 
the proceeds applied to the 
satisfaction thereof. 

Witness my hand this 24th day 
of October, 2011. 

BRUCE ELFANT 
CONSTABLE PRECINCT 5 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
BY/s/ Alan Redd DEPUTY 
ON THE PROPERTY SOLD, 
THERE ARE NO WARRAN- 
TIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, 
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIM- 
ITED TO, THE IMPLIED WAR- 
RANTIES OF MERCHANT- 
ABILITY AND FITNESS FOR 
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 
YOU BUY THE PROPERTY “AS 
IS”. BIDDERS ARE FURTHER 
ADVISED THAT PURCHASE 
OF THE PROPERTY AT THIS 
EXECUTION SALE MAY NOT 
EXTINGUISH ANY LIENS 
OR SECURITY INTERESTS 
ON THE PROPERTY. YOU 
ARE SIMPLY PURCHASING 
WHATEVER INTEREST 
THE DEBTOR HAS IN THE 
PROPERTY. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY QUESTIONS, YOU NEED 
TO CONSULT COUNSEL OF 
YOUR CHOICE. 


HUD #4956897819 TS#11- 
12086-21 NOTICE OF 
DEFAULT AND FORECLO- 
SURE SALE WHEREAS, on 

03/26/2004, a certain (Deed 
of Trust) was executed by 
Edward Doyle, as Trustor, in 
favor of Wells Fargo Home 
Mortgage, Inc., as benefi- 
ciary, and Robert K. Fowler, as 
Trustee and was Recorded on 
04/05/2004 as Instrument No. 
2004063186, in the office of the 
Travis County, Texas Recorder, 
and WHEREAS, the Deed 
of Trust was insured by the 
UNITED STATES SECRETARY 
OF HOUSING AND URBAN 
DEVELOPMENT, (the Secre- 
tary) pursuant to the National 
Housing Act for the purpose 
of providing single family 
housing; and WHEREAS, the 
beneficial interest in the 
Deed of Trust is now owned 
by the Secretary, pursuant to 
an assignment recorded on 
10/02/2008, as Instrument # 
20081 64565 i n the off ice of the 
Travis County, Texas Recorder, 
and WHEREAS, a default has 
been made by reason of failure 
to pay all sums due under 
the Deed of Trust, pursuant 
to Paragraph 9 Subsection 
(i) of said deed of Trust and 
WHEREAS, by virtue of this 
default, the Secretary has 
declared the entire amount 
of the indebtedness secured 
by the Deed of Trust to be 
immediately due and payable, 
NOW THEREFORE, pursuant 
to power vesting in me by 
the Single Family Mortgage 
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 
U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by24CFR 
part 27, subpart B, and by the 
Secretary’s designation of us 
as Foreclosure Commissioner” 
notice is hereby given that on 
12/06/11 @12:00 pm to 03:00 
pm local time, all real and 
personal property at or used in 
connection with following de- 
scribed premises ("Property”) 
will be sold at public auction 
to the highest bidder: Com- 
monly known as: 2004 Encino 
Circle, Austin, TX 78723 More 
thoroughly described as: Lot 
3, Encino Terrace, according to 
map or plat thereof recorded 
in Volume 30, Page 22 of the 
Plat Records of Travis County, 
Texas. The sale will be held 
at the following location: THE 
PLACE OF SALE SHALL BE 
IN THE AREA DESIGNATED 
BY THE COMMISSIONERS 
COURT OF SUCH COUNTY 
PURSUANT TO 51 .002 OF 
THE TEXAS PROPERTY CODE 
AS THE PLACE WHERE FORE- 
CLOSURE SALES ARE TO 
TAKE PLACE, (IF NOT SUCH 
PLACE IS SO DESIGNATED, 
THE SALE SHALL BE IN THE 
AREA WHERE THIS NOTICE 
OF SALE IS POSTED), IN THE 
CITY OF AUSTIN, TRAVIS 
COUNTY, TEXAS. Per The 
Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development the 
estimated opening bid will 
be $168,868.19. There will be 
no pro-ration of taxes, rents 
or other income or liabilities, 
except that the purchaser will 
pay, at or before the closing, 
his prorate share of any real 
estate taxes that have been 
paid by the Secretary to 
the date of the foreclosure 
sale. When making a bid, all 
bidders except the Secretary 
must submit a deposit totaling 
ten percent (10%) of the Secre- 
tary’s estimated bid amount, 
in the form of a cashier’s 
check made payable to the 
Foreclosure Commissioner 
Cimarron Trustee Services. 
Each oral bid need not be 
accompanied by a deposit. If 
the successful bid is an oral, 
a deposit of $16,886.81 must 
be presented before the bid- 
ding is closed. The deposit is 
nonrefundable. The remainder 
of the purchase price must 
be delivered within 30 days of 
the sale or at such time as the 
Secretary may determine for 
good cause shown, time being 
of the essence. This amount, 
like the bid deposits, must 
be delivered in the form of a 
cashier’s or certified check. 

If the Secretary is the high 
bidder, he need not pay 


the bid amount in cash. The 
successful bidder will pay all 
conveyancing fees, all real 
estate and other taxes that are 
due on or after the delivery of 
the remainder of the payment 
and all other costs associated 
with the transfer of title. At the 
conclusion of the sale, the de- 
posits of the unsuccessful bid- 
ders will be returned to them. 
The Secretary may grant an 
extension of time with which 
to deliver the remainder of the 
payment. All extensions will 
be fore 9-day increments for a 
fee of $600.00 paid in advance. 
The extension fee shall be 
in the form of certified or ca- 
shier’s check made payable to 
the commissioner. If the high 
bidder closed the sale prior to 
the expiration period, the un- 
used portion of the extension 
fee shall be applied toward the 
amount due. If the high bidder 
is unable to close the sale 
within the required period, or 
within any extensions of time 
granted by the Secretary, the 
high bidder may be required to 
forfeit the cash deposit or, at 
the election of the Foreclosure 
Commissioner after consulta- 
tion with the HUD Field Office 
representative, will be liable 
to HUD for any costs incurred 
as a result of such failure. The 
Commissioner may, at the 
direction of HUD Field Office 
Representative, offer the 
property to the second highest 
bidder to an amount equal to 
the highest price offered by 
that bidder. There is no right 
of redemption, or right of 
possession based upon a right 
of redemption, in the mort- 
gagor or others subsequent 
to a foreclosure completed 
pursuant to the Act. Therefore, 
the Foreclosure Commis- 
sioner will issue a Deed to the 
purchaser(s) upon receipt of 
the entire purchase price in 
accordance with the terms of 
the sale as proved herein HUD 
does not guarantee that the 
property will be vacant. The 
amount that must be paid by 
the Mortgagor, to stop the sale 
prior to the scheduled sale 
date is $168,718.19 as of 
12/05/2011, PLUS all other 
amounts that are due under 
the mortgage agreement. Plus 
advertising costs and postage 
expenses incurred in giving 
notice, mileage by the most 
reasonable road distance for 
posting notices and for the 
Foreclosure Commissioner’s 
attendance at the sale, 
reasonable and customary 
costs incurred for title and 
lien record searches, the 
necessary out-of-pocket costs 
incurred by the Foreclosure 
Commissioner for recording 
documents. Plus a commis- 
sion for the Foreclosure com- 
missioner and all other costs 
incurred in the connection 
with the foreclosure prior to 
reinstatement. Date: Septem- 
ber 15, 2011 FORECLOSURE 
COMMISSIONER: CIMARRON 
SERVICE CORF! of NEVADA 
719 14TH STREET MODESTO, 
CA 95354 Telephone No. (209) 
544-9658 Facsimile No. (209) 
544-6119 CATHEY E. LATNER, 
Vice President 

Ad #15526: 2011-11-04 201 Mi- 
ll, 2011-11-18 


IMPORTANT LEGAL 
NOTICE MAIL THE 
COMPLETED AND SIGNED 
FORM AND ALL OF YOUR 
DOCUMENTATION TO: 
FIRST AMERICAN LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY IN 
RECEIVERSHIP 
ANGENEND & AUGUSTINE, 
P.C., SPECIAL DEPUTY 
RECEIVER 
P.O. BOX 29717 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 78755 
Contact Number: 
512-794-8989 or 
fax 512-794-9898 
For more information that 
impacts your legal rights, go 
to http://www.aalawsdr.com 
THIS PROOF OF CLAIM 
FORM MUST BE SIGNED 
AND PLACED IN THE MAIL 
NO LATER THAN 1 1 :59PM 
CST on November 30, 

2011, TO BE CONSIDERED 
TIMELY FILED 


NOTICE TO CLAIMANTS 
AND PARTIES IN INTER- 
EST OF THE FIRST AMERI- 
CAN LIFE INSURANCE 
RECEIVERSHIP 
RE: The State of Texas v. First 
American Life Insurance Com- 
pany; Cause No. GV-1 0-0001 20; 
In the 200th Judicial District 
Court of Travis County, Texas; 
Receivership No. 552 ("the 
receivership proceeding") 

On February 18, 2010, First 
American Life Insurance 
Company (referred to as the 
“First American Receivership”) 
was placed in receivership for 
the purposes of liquidation 
by order of the 200th Judicial 
District Court of Travis County, 
Texas ("receivership court”) 
under its Order Appointing 
Liquidator and Permanent 
Injunction ("Liquidation 
Order"). The Texas Commis- 
sioner of Insurance has been 
appointed Receiver of the First 
American Receivership and 
has designated Angenend 
& Augustine, PC. as Special 
Deputy Receiver ("SDR”). 

All policies of insurance for 
First American are now as- 
sumed by North America Life 
Insurance Company (North 
America LIC) and are being 
administered by their office. 

If you have a claim under 
a policy of insurance, you 
should contact North America 
LIC about the status of your 
claim. You can obtain more 
information at http://www. 
nagrp.com/contact.cfm. 

All claimants who have 
a claim, or any portion of 
a claim, against the First 
American Receivership must 
file a proof of claim ("POC”). 

In order for a POC to be con- 
sidered timely filed, it must 
be filed with the SDR prior to 
the claims filing deadline. The 
POC form is available on the 
First American Receivership’s 
website with a Frequently 
Asked Questions section 
located at www.aalawsdr.com. 
The receivership court has set 
a CLAIMS FILING DEAD- 
LINE of 11:59 p.m., C.S.T. on 
November 30, 2011 ("claims 
filing deadline”). Accordingly, 
any and all timely-filed claims 
against the First American 
Receivership must be post- 
marked or otherwise delivered 
to the address above on or 
before November 30, 2011, 
at 11:59 p.m., C.S.T. Failure 
to complete the POC form 
according to the instructions 
may cause your claim to be 
delayed or disallowed. 

The receivership court has 
also set a date by which 
unliquidated or contingent 
claims must be filed. Proof of 
all amounts filed under POCs 
must be documented and 
proven no later than January 
31,2012, at 11:59 p.m. C.S.T. 

If your claim is for reserves 
under a reinsurance contract, 
you must provide support for 
the amount of reserves you 
claim, by actuarial support 
or otherwise. 

The Liquidation Order and 
TEX.INS. CODE 443.008 
enjoin all actions against the 
First American Receivership 
and apply to all persons. All 
direct claims against the First 
American Receivership must 
be made under a POC. All 
litigation in which the First 
American Receivership is a 
defendant may need to be dis- 
missed upon filing of a POC. 
The Liquidation Order applies 
to all persons and requires 
them to cooperate with the 
SDR and volunteer informa- 
tion regarding claims against 
the First American receiver- 
ship or information about 
property, including records, of 
the First American Receiver- 
ship. All persons are enjoined 
by the Liquidation Order from 
transacting any business of 
the First American Receiver- 
ship and are required to report 
to the Special Deputy Receiver 
regarding any assets. 

The SDR specifically requests 
that all reinsurance brokers 
send notice of the matters 
contained in this legal notice 
to all policyholders, certificate 
holders, additional named in- 
sureds, and reinsurers, ceded 
and assumed, contained in 
their files whose rights may 
be impacted by the Liquida- 
tion Order, the claims filing 
deadline, or the stay. 


/ the COMMON LA 

I bu Luke Ellis will return on 

I FIRST THURSDAY Of EVERY NOI 


TT 


Until then, here’s an Uncommon law 
that you may need to be aware of: 



It’s against the law to sing 
off-key in North Carolina. 



260-SPCAu>ll- 

HtLUHUH., UUXHI.n ' 'UtM U f f 

XEHTOtALTEXAS I PCA .<0M -Ml"** 


I am a 3* per inrr[<1ic Irl III girl 
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sif I m i Chihiiui llirMluit 
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Uli i iupp*ljr vl adgplign dlf 
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Pef of f he Week 




BIANCA 

Hi, my name is Francesca 
Bianca. I am 2 years young 
and looking for a forever 
family! I am a gorgeous girl 
who is very calm and loving 
in nature. Please come 
spend some time with me 
and see if we hit it off! 





124 W. Anderson Ln. 512/646-7387 ext.105 


AV1214 POUND SALE 

NOTICE OF SALE OF MOTOR VEHICLES IMPOUND- 
ED BY ORDER OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE IN AC- 
CORDANCE WITH SECTION 683.011 ET SEQ V TEX- 
AS TRANSPORTATION CODE, REGULATING THE 
IMPOUNDING AND SALE OF ABANDONED VEHI- 
CLES BY DELEGATE OR PERSONALLY. 

THE PURCHASER SHALL TAKE TITLE TO THE MO- 
TOR VEHICLE FREE AND CLEAR OF ALL LIENS 
AND CLAIMS OF OWNERSHIP AND IS ENTITLED 
TO REGISTER THE PURCHASED MOTOR VEHICLE 
AND RECIEVE A CERTIFICATE OFTITLE. 

I WILL PROCEEDTO SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH IN THE CITY OF 
AUSTIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS, THE FOLLOW- 
ING DESCRIBED MOTOR VEHICLES WHICH HAVE 
NOT BEEN REDEEMED BYTHE OWNERS, THERE- 
OF TO WIT; 


DECEMBER 14,2011 @ 9:30 AM 
@ SOUTHSIDE WRECKER, 8200 S. 
CONGRESS, AUSTIN, TX 78745 


112880948 

1992 

HOND 

4DR 

BL9V581 

TX 

J H M C B7679 N C026847 

115050556 

1993 

JEEP 

LL 

CPP284. 

TX 

1J4FT68S8PL601234 

115051639 

1998 

HOND 

2DR 

608SGJ 

TX 

1 H G EJ8144W L009697 

115051647 

1993 

HOND 

4DR 

TVK599 

TX 

1 H GC B7652 PA129267 

115051778 

2001 

LINC 

4DR 

BZ5G916 

TX 

1LN H M86S11Y721280 

115052218 

1997 

HOND 

2DR 

832WMC 

TX 


115052409 

1998 

FORD 

BUS 


FL 

1FDXE40F0WHC05903 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 99 



LEGAL/ 

NOTICES <ont. 

You can view or download cop- 
ies of all orders, code sections, 
and forms mentioned in this 
notice from www.aalawsdr. 
com. You also may request 
that they be mailed to you by 
writing to: First American 
Receivership, Angenend 

& Augustine, P.C., Special 
Deputy Receiver, RO. Box 
29717, Austin, TX 78755. 

There is additional informa- 
tion, including important legal 
information about your legal 
right to file a proof of claim 
and about all the matters dis- 
cussed below, located at www. 
aalawsdr.com. Procedures 
before the receivership court 
are contained in the Order 
of Reference to Master. The 
receivership court has set 
the next status conference 
hearing by submission for 
Monday, October 31 ,2011. You 
may request to be added to 
the service list to receive all 
pleadings filed and notices of 
future status conferences in 
the First American Receiver- 
ship by email. You can make 
your request to be added by 
emailing mmiller@aalawfirm. 
net. If you request notice 
relating to a specific company, 
include the company name as 
well as your name, address, 
phone number, fax number, 
and email address. If you are 
an attorney, please designate 
your client. 

Angenend & Augustine, PC. 
Special Deputy Receiver of the 
First American Receivership 
RO. Box 29717 
Austin, TX 78755 
IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICE 


NOTICE ON NOVEMBER 
1,2011 THE CITY COUNCIL 
OF THE CITY OF SUNSET 
VALLEY PASSED ORDINANCE 
NO. 110111 AMENDING 
THE PROVISIONS OF THE 
WATER CONSERVATION AND 
DROUGHT CONTINGENCY 
PLAN INCORPORATED IN 
CODE OF SUNSET VALLEY 
TO IDENTIFY PLANNING 
PARAMETERS AND CONSER- 
VATION GOALS; PROVIDING 
FOR RESTRICTIONS TO 
BE EFFECTIVE WHEN THE 
LCRA EFFECTS DROUGHT 
CONTINGENCY MEASURES; 
ESTABLISHING IRRIGATION 
SCHEDULES; SETTING 
GOALS FOR REDUCED 
WATER LOSS; PROVIDING 
FOR PUBLICATION OF 
NOTICE; AND PROVIDING 
FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN 
EFFECTIVE DATE. 


NOTICE THE CITY 
COUNCIL OF THE CITY 
OF SUNSET VALLEY 
ADOPTED ORDINANCE# 
111101 AMENDING SECTION 
1.201 AND CHAPTER 5 OF 
THE LAND DEVELOPMENT 
CODE, AND ADDING NEW 
SECTION 17.119 TO PROVIDE 
AMENDED DEFINITIONS, 
AMENDED FLOOD REGULA- 
TIONS, AND PENALTIES FOR 
A VIOLATION OF FLOOD 
REGULATIONS; PROVIDING 
FOR SEVERABILITY, PUBLI- 
CATION, AND AN EFFECTIVE 
DATE 


NOTICE OF ABANDONED 
VEHICLES Pursuant of the 
TX Abandoned Motor Vehicle 
Act, the following vehicles 
will be auctioned off by Public 
Auction unless charges are 
satisfied within 10 days. 

2000 TOYOTA COROLLA VI N: 
2T1 BR12E9YC349706 
INTERSTATE CHAPARRAL 
TOWING INC. 

1 604 Howard Lane Austin, TX 
78728 (512) 835-6580 


NOTICE OF ABANDONED 
VEHICLES Pursuant to the 
Texas Abandoned Motor 
Vehicle Act, the following 
vehicles will be sold at a 
public sale unless charges are 
satisfied within ten (10) days. 
Lone Star Towing, 2305 W. 
Howard Ln., Austin, TX. 

1990 Lexus 4drLP# CX3X611 
towed from 12500 Dessau Rd 
Austin on 

10/5/11; 1995 Ford Aerostar 
LP# BT3T713 towed from 
Riata Vista & Parmer Ln 
Austin on 10/2/11; 1997 Honda 
Civic LP# BT3Y236 towed 
from 2000 blk N 1H35S/B 
frontage on 9/3/1 1 ; 1 995 Chevy 
1500 LP# 9PDF84 towed from 
1106 Floradale on 9/23/11; 1994 
Toyota Corolla LP# TKC866 
towed from 6100 B Ridge 
Point Pkwy Austin on 8/18/11; 
1996 VW Passat LP# CRX124 
towed from 11600 N IH 35 S/B 
service on 8/24/11; 2001 Ford 
Mustang LP# BF7G269 towed 
from Burnet Rd & Braker Ln 
on 8/21/11; 1997 Ford F250 
LP# BD20049 towed from 
Lakeline Plaza on 9/12/11; 

2004 Nissan Sentra LP# 
NWH301 towed from 9200 blk 
N Research on 8/10/11; 1998 
Dodge Neon LP# CK8Y350 
towed from 290E & FM 973 
Manor 10/16/11. 

NOTICE OF ABANDONED 
VESSEL PURSUANT OF 
TEXAS ABANDONED 
MOTOR VEHICLE ACT, 

THE FOLLOWING WILL BE 
SOLD AT PUBLIC SALE ON 
November 23,2011. 9AM . 1995 
POLARIS JET SKI WITH VIN 
PLE46613C595 
STORAGE FACILITY: 
SOUTHSIDE WRECKER, 8200 
S CONGRESS, 

AUSTIN, TX. 78745. 


NOTICE OF AUCTION The 

Storage Center, under Chapter 
59 of the Texas Property 
Code, hereby gives Notice of 
Sale under Said Act, to Wit: 

On Monday, December 5 at 
10AM, a Public Auction will 
be held at 2150 Double Creek 
Dr., Round Rock, TX 78664 to 
satisfy Landlords’ Lien. Sale 
to highest bidder, cash only. 
We reserve the right to refuse 
any or all bids. Property will 
be viewed at door, and buyer 
will remove all items and leave 
unit clean. 

Units to Auction: 

#195 Nate Brown - Computer 
circuit boards & components, 
misc. 

#278 Amber Piatt -Chair, 

Xmas decorations, stuffed 
animals, misc. 

#764 Danetta Hale - Child’s 
kitchen & bike, furniture, BBQ 
cooker 

#808 Freddy Plascencia - 
Household & children’s items, 
clothing, misc. 

#894 Gwen Williams - Bed 
headboard, tires, washer, TV 
#910 Maria Lanes-Castellano 
- Rocker, bookcase, household 
items 

#914 Pamela Moreland - Din- 
ing table & cabinet, smoker, 
household items 
Continuation of Auction will 
be at 981 Red Bud Lane @ Old 
Settlers Rd., Round Rock, TX 
78665 at 11:00 AM. 

Units to Auction: 

#512= = = Irvin Barnett - 
Furniture, boxes, misc 

# 608= = = Dave Chudakoff - 
Furniture, bicycle, refrigerator, 
misc. 

#914= = = Kancy R. Degolla- 
do - Furniture, TV, misc. 

# 933= = Carrick Glover - Mat- 
tress, boxes, chair, misc. 

# 934 = Carrick Glover - Book- 
shelf, dresser, chair, misc. 
#1001= Aaron Bryant - Sofa, 
desk, mattress, furniture 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING Notice is hereby given 
that the Zoning Commission 
of the City of Sunset Valley, 
Texas, will hold a Public Hear- 
ing on Tuesday, the 6th day 
of December ,2011, at 7:00 
p.m. at the City Hall located 
at 3205 Jones Road, Sunset 
Valley, Texas to consider the 
following items: 

(1) A Zoning Change on a 
29.18 acre tract of land being 
a portion of that certain 280.5 
acres conveyed to J.D. Weaver 
Family Limited Partnership 

as recorded in Volume 12345, 
Page 1715 of the Real Prop- 
erty Records of Travis County, 
Texas also known as Lot 1,2, 3, 
4 and 5 of Block A, Sunset Val- 
ley Village Homestead such 
land being more particularly 
described in that certain quit- 
claim Deed dated December 
11, 1996 as recorded in volume 
1 3337, Page 323 of the Real 
Property Records of Travis 
County, Texas from R-2 Retail 
with Conditional Overlays to 
HC Highway Commercial with 
Conditional Overlays 

(2) Consider amendments to 
the allowable uses within the 
Highway Commercial (HC) 
District to include revisions to 
Pet Services; the addition of 

a Wedding and Event Center 
Use; and revisions to the 
other provisions of the Land 
Development Code relating to 
these two uses. 

All interested persons are 
invited to attend and par- 
ticipate in said hearing. Any 
person may submit testimony 
in person at such hearing or 
submit written comments 
filed with the City Secretary 
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 
p.m., Monday through Friday 
prior to the hearing or emailed 
to citysecretary@sunsetvalley. 
org. All written comments 
must be received by 3:00 
p.m., on or before Monday 
December 5, 201 1 . The zoning 
change and proposed changes 
to the Highway 
Commercial uses may be 
examined at the office of the 
City Administrator for Sunset 
Valley, Texas during regular of- 
fice hours or may be accessed 
on the city’s website at www. 
sunsetvalley.org. 

I certify that the above notice 
of meeting was posted at City 
Hall, 3205 Jones Road, Sunset 
Valley, Texas, on the 18th day 
of November, 201 1 at 5:00 p.m. 
Rae Gene Greenough 
City Secretary 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

Pursuant to Chapter 59, 

Texas Property Code, 
Stor-A-Way Slaughter Creek 
which is located at 9706 
Manchaca Road, Austin Texas 
78748 will hold a public auc- 
tion of property being sold to 
satisfya landlord’s lien. Sale 
will begin at 10:00 o’clock 
AM on Monday, December 5, 
2011 at 9706 Manchaca Road, 
Austin Texas 78748. Property 
will be sold to the highest 
bidder for cash. Cleanup 
and removal deposit may be 
required. Seller reserves the 
right to not accept any bid 
and to withdraw property from 
sale. Property in each 
space will be sold by the 
space. Property being sold 
includes contents of spaces of 
following tenants: 

Juan R Ayala-unit 
1281-clothes, boxes, fishing 
equipment, tool boxes, refrig- 
erator, sofa, bedding, misc. 
household items 
Christopher Johnston-unit 
2201 -safe, furniture, throw 
rugs, misc. household items 
Phillip Davis-unit 2236-washer, 
dryer, boxes, mattress, misc. 
household items 
Shelly Hoffman-unit 2339-TV, 
boxes, furniture, plastic tubs, 
dolly, misc. items 


James G Black-unit 2347- 
boxes, air compressor, seats, 
tools-misc., tailgate rack 
Maria Hernandez-Sanchez- 
unit 2412-furniture, boxes, 
misc. items, mattress 
Stanley B Mugrage-unit 2433- 
tires, tools, misc. household 
items 

Rachelle Gonzales-unit 
1160-washer, dryer, chairs, 
boxes, furniture 
Submitted by: Tabatha Hol- 
laway, Property Manager 
Stor-A-Way Slaughter Creek 
Storage 

slaughtercreek@stor-a-way, 

com 

Phone 512-282-2728 
Fax 512-282-2998 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

YOUR STORAGE SOLUTION 
hereby gives notice of Public 
Sale under the provisions 
of Chapter 59 of the Texas 
Property Code. This sale will 
be held on December 6, 2011 
at 12: 00 P.M. at the YOUR 
STORAGE SOLUTION located 
at 12506 N Lamar Blvd, Austin, 
Texas. This sale is being held 
to satisfy a Landlord’s Lien. 
Everything sold is purchased 
“as is” “where is” for cash. 

The items in the unit are fur- 
niture and household goods 
unless otherwise indicated. 
YOUR STORAGE SOLUTION 
reserves the right to set a 
minimum bid, refuse any bid, 
or to cancel any Public Sale 
that is advertised. Announce- 
ments made the day of the 
sale take precedence over any 
printed materials related to 
the sale. 

Your Storage Solution 
12506 N Lamar Blvd. 

Austin, TX 78753 

Sylvester Green, Unit C259 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

Pursuant to Chapter 59, TX. 
Property Code, South Austin 
Self Storage will hold a public 
auction to satisfy a landlord’s 
lien on Dec. 9, 2011 at 1:00pm 
at 5405 Wasson Road, Austin, 
TX 78745. Property will be sold 
by the unit to the highest bid- 
der for cash. $50.00 cleanout 
deposit. Property being sold 
includes furniture and general 
household items in units of 
Janet Harms and James W. 
Dyess. Seller reserves the 
right to not accept any bid 
and to withdraw property 
from sale. 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

of property to satisfy land- 
lord’s lien. Sale is 10:00am 
December 6, 2011. Property 
will be sold to highest bidder 
for cash at the time of auction. 
Cleanup and removal de- 
posit may be required. Seller 
reserves right to withdraw 
property from sale or not ac- 
cept any bidder. Property will 
be sold in entire contents of 
each individual storage unit. 
Property includes contents 
of spaces of following ten- 
ants: Oman Brady, Nathan 
Sattler, David Watts, James 
Rodriguez, Theresa Sifuentes, 
Kristopher Gilmore, Melanie 
Bauer, James Hudson, Kerri 
Neumann, Bernardeth Leal. 
Property being sold includes 
the following: Household 
furniture, appliances, bicycle, 
speakers, lamp, dollhouse, 
patio furniture, chainsaw, 
kitchenware, plastic totes, 
boxes, computer, trunk, tires, 
carpet, walker, books, clothes, 
suitcases. 

Contact Lockaway Storage 
9910 Slaughter Creek Dr., 
Austin, TX, 78748. 

512-282-7807 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

Pursuant to Chapter 59, Texas 
Property Code, a public auc- 
tion to satisfy a landlord’s lien 
will be held at the locations 
listed below on November 28, 
2011. Property will be sold by 
the unit to the highest bidder 
for cash. 

10:00 AM 
R&K Storage 
10013 RRFM 620 N 
Austin, TX 78726 
Charles Morris: 

72 Dura Craft w/ 75 85HP 
Evinrude Motor on Pontoon 
Trailer 

Seller reserves the right to 
not accept any bid and to with- 
draw property from sale. 


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 

CUBESMART hereby gives 
notice of Public Sale under the 
provisions of Chapter 59 of the 
Texas Property Code. This sale 
will be held on 
December 06, 2011 at 12:45 
P.M. at the CUBESMART 
located at 10025 Manchaca 
Road, Austin, Texas. This sale 
is being held to satisfy a Land- 
lord’s Lien. Everything sold is 
purchased “as is" “where is” 
for cash. The items in the unit 
are furniture and household 
goods unless otherwise indi- 
cated. CUBESMART reserves 
the right to set a minimum 
bid, refuse any bid, or to 
cancel any Public Sale that is 
advertised. Announcements 
made the day of the sale take 
precedence over any printed 
materials related to the sale. 
CubeSmart #753 
10025 Manchaca Rd 
Austin, TX. 78748 
Ramiro Deleon, Unit 138 
Janice Salinas Ramirez, 

Unit 853 


NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL 
PROPERTY State of Texas 
County of Travis Cause: 
D1GV1 0000532-4 By virtue 
of an Order of Sale issued 
by the clerk of the 147th 
District Court of TRAVIS 
County, Texas, October 31 , 
2011, in cause numbered 
D1GV1 0000532-4, styled THE 
STATE OF TEXAS versus 
6437 ADEN LANE, AUSTIN, 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 
78739 - RESIDENTIAL PROP- 
ERTY on a judgment rendered 
against 6437 ADEN LANE, 
AUSTIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, 
TEXAS 78739 - RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTY; I did on Novem- 
ber 01, 2011, at 2:00 p.m., levy 
upon as the property of 6437 
ADEN LANE, AUSTIN, TRA- 
VIS COUNTY, TEXAS 78739 
- RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 
the following described real 
property: 

Lot 4, Block D, Circle C 
Ranch, Phase B, Section 
Eleven, A subdivision in 
Travis County, Texas ac- 
cording to the map or plat of 
record in Volume 92, Page 68, 
68, 70, Plat Records of Travis 
County, Texas (Property 
address: 6437 Aden Lane 
Austin, Travis County, Texas 
78749) of the map or plat 
records of Travis County, 
Texas. 

On December 06, 201 1 , being 
the first Tuesday of the month, 
between the hours of 10:00 
A.M. and 4:00 PM., beginning 
at 10:00 A.M., at the Travis 
County Courthouse, 1000 Gua- 
dalupe Street, Austin, Texas, I 
will sell for cash to the highest 
bidder, all the right, title and 
interest of 6437 ADEN LANE, 
AUSTIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, 
TEXAS 78739 - RESIDENTIAL 
PROPERTY in and to the real 
property described above. 


Dated at Austin, Travis County, 
Texas, November 03, 201 1 
Bruce Elfant, 

Constable Precinct 5 
Travis County, Texas 
by SENIOR DEPUTY ALAN 
REDD, Deputy 
Notice to Bidders: You are 
buying whatever interest, if 
any, the Debtor has in the 
property. Purchase of the 
Debtor’s interest in the prop- 
erty may not extinguish any 
liens or security interests held 
by other persons. There are no 
warranties, express or implied, 
regarding the property being 
sold, including but not 
limited to warranties of title, 
merchantability or fitness for a 
particular purpose. 

Notice to Judgment Debtor: 

If there is any property, real 
or personal, you want to 
point out for levy in lieu of 
the above described property, 
you must contact this office 
immediately. 

Bidders shall present an 
unexpired written statement 
issued to the person in the 
manner prescribed by Section 
34.015, Tax Code, showing that 
the Travis County Assessor- 
Collector has determined 
that there are no delinquent 
ad valorem taxes owed by 
the person. In addition, an 
individual may not bid on or 
purchase property in the name 
of any other individual. 


NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS 
HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST 
THE ESTATE OF MORRIS 
PATRICK KIDD, DECEASED 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters of Independent 
Administration for the Estate 
of MORRIS PATRICK KIDD, 
Deceased, were granted on 
November 8, 201 1 , pending in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 1-001465 

in the Probate Court No. 1 
of Travis County, Texas, to: 
MADELYN A. KIDD 
Independent Administrator 
All persons having claims 
against the Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
within the time and in the 
manner prescribed by law. 
Based on instruction of the 
Independent Administrator 
that claims be addressed 
in care of the Independent 
Administrator’s attorney, the 
address to which claims may 
be presented is: 

MADELYN A. KIDD 
Independent Administrator 
Estate of MORRIS PATRICK 
KIDD, Deceased 
c/o Law Offices of Rhonda 
H. Brink 

7301 Burnet Road, #102-548 
Austin, Texas 78757 
Dated this 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011 

MADELYN A. KIDD, Inde- 
pendent Administrator of the 
Estate of MORRIS PATRICK 
KIDD, Deceased 
By: /s/ Rhonda H. Brink 
Law Offices of Rhonda H. 

Brink 

7301 Burnet Road, #102-548 
Austin, Texas 78757 
Phone: (512) 454-8400 
FAX: (512) 454-2055 
ATTORNEY FOR MADELYN 
A. KIDD 

Independent Administrator 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Nancy Ellen 
Borgman, Deceased, were 
issued on June 2, 201 1 , in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 1-00678, 
pending in the Probate Court 
No. 1 , Travis County, Texas, to: 
Brenda June Fillmon. 

All persons having claims 
against this estate are re- 
quired to present them within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 

Dated: November 15, 2011 
D. KEVIN CLARKE 
Attorney at Law 
1411 West Avenue, Suite 100 
Austin, TX 78701-1537 
(512) 662-1865 (Telephone) 
(512) 681-3753 (Facsimile) 

/s/ D. Kevin Clarke 
SBN: 24029482 
ATTORNEY FOR THE INDE- 
PENDENT EXECUTOR 


NOTICE TO CREDI- 
TORS NOTICE is hereby 
given that original Letters 
Testamentary for the Estate 
of Bernard Edward Breihan, 
Jr., Deceased, were issued 
on November 14, 2011 in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 1-001766 
pending in Probate Court No. 

1 of Travis County, Texas, to: 
Robert Breihan. 

The notice to the Independent 
Executor may be delivered 
at the following address: c/o 
Barnes Lipscomb & Stewart 
PLLC 

Attorneys at Law 
2901 Bee Caves Road, 

Box D 

Austin, Texas 78746 

All persons having claims 

against this Estate which is 

currently being administered 
are required to present them 
within the time and in the 
manner prescribed by law. 
Dated the 14th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011. 

/s/ Clint Alexander 
Attorney for Independent 
Executor 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Reva Marie 
Jergens, Deceased, were is- 
sued on November 10, 2011, in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-11-001719, 
pending in the Probate Court 
Number One, Travis County, 
Texas, to Margaret Mary 
Rodriguez. 

Claims may be presented in 
care of the attorney for the 
Estate addressed as follows: 
Representative, Estate of Reva 
Marie Jergens, Deceased 
c/o Walter C. Guebert 
Walter C.Guebert, PC. 

5900 Balcones Drive, 

Suite 190 

Austin, Texas 78731 
All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
within the time and in the 
manner prescribed by law. 
DATED this 11th day of 
November, 2011. 

WALTER C. GUEBERT, PC. 

By: /s/ Walter C. Guebert 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters of Independent 
Administration for the Estate 
of Judy Elizabeth Spurlock 
Poole, Deceased were 
issued on the 25th day of 
October, 2011, in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-1 1-000941 pending in 
the Probate Court of Travis 
County, Texas to Thomas Lo- 
fland Poole. 


Claims may be presented in 
care of the Independent Ad- 
ministrator of the of the Estate 
addressed as follows: Thomas 
Lofland Poole, Independent 
Administrator of the Estate 
of Judy Elizabeth Spurlock 
Poole, C/O Tom Tourtellotte, 
Hance Scarborough, LLF! 1 1 1 
Congress Avenue, Suite 500, 
Austin, Texas 78701. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate, which is 
currently being administered, 
are required to present them 
to the foregoing address 
within the time and the man- 
ner prescribed by law. 

Dated: November 18, 2011. 
Thomas Lofland Poole, Inde- 
pendent Administrator of the 
Estate of Judy Elizabeth Poole 
by Tom Tourtellotte, attorney 
for Thomas Lofland Poole. 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Nicholas Den- 
nis Angione, Deceased, were 
issued on October 27, 2011, in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 1-001556, 
pending in the Probate Court 
No. 1 , Travis County, Texas, to: 
Kathy Willis currently known 
as Kathleen Munchow. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
to the undersigned within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 
c/o: Mark D. Swanson 
Attorney at Law 
940 E. 51st Street, Ste. 101 
Austin, Texas 78751 
DATED the 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011. 

/s/ Mark D. Swanson 
Attorney for Kathleen 
Munchow 

State Bar No.: 19555200 
940 E. 51st Street, Ste. 101 
Austin, Texas 78751 
Telephone: (512) 990-9090 
Facsimile: (512) 990-1890 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Sonia Na- 
toli,A/K/A Sonia Oh Natoli, 
Deceased, were issued on 
November 8, 201 1 , in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 1-001 681, pend- 
ing in the Probate Court No. 
One, Travis County, Texas, to: 
Catherine Ann Melvin. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
to the undersigned within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 
c/o: James L. Arth 
700 Lavaca Street, 

Suite 1150 
Austin, Texas 78701 
DATED November 8, 2011 
/s/ James L. Arth 
Attorney for Catherine Ann 
Melvin 

State Bar No.: 01362900 
700 Lavaca Street, 

Suite 1150 
Austin, Texas 78701 
Telephone: (512) 479-8989 
Facsimile: (512) 479-7910 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Graham F. 
Carey, Deceased, were issued 
on November 1, 2011, in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 1-001 692 pending 
in Probate Court No. 1 of 
Travis County, Texas, to Kira 
Carey of 5404 Mountain Cedar 
Cove, Austin, Texas 78731 . 


100 the Austin chronicle NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


All persons having claims 
against this Estate, which 
is currently being adminis- 
tered, are required to present 
them within the time and 
in the manner prescribed 
by law. All claims should 
be addressed in care of the 
Independent Executor’s 
attorney, Michael H. Ripp, Jr., 
at Giordani, Swanger, Ripp 
& Phillips LLR 100 Congress 
Ave., Suite 1440, Austin, 
Texas 78701 . 

DATED this the 9th day of 
November, 2011. 

GIORDANI, SWANGER, RIPP 
& PHILLIPS LLP 
By: /s/ Michael H. Ripp, Jr. 
ATTORNEYS FOR KIRA 
CAREY, INDEPENDENT 
EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE 
OF GRAHAM F. CAREY, 
DECEASED 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters of Indepen- 
dent Administration for the 
Estate of Irene Ethel Redd, 
Deceased, were issued on 
November 8, 201 1 , in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 1-000685, pend- 
ing in the Probate Court No. 
One, Travis County, Texas, to: 
Alton Wayne Redd. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
to the undersigned within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 
c/o Guy F. Gebbia 
Attorney at Law 
1505 W. Koenig Lane 
Austin, TX 78756 
Dated the 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011. 

/s/ Guy F. Gebbia 
State Bar No.: 07786380 
Attorney for Alton Wayne 
Redd 

1505 W. Koenig Lane 
Austin, TX 78756 
Telephone: (512) 450-1422 
Facsimile: (512) 450-1799 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
for the Estate of Dayton C. 
Ersch, Deceased, were is- 
sued on November 3, 201 1 , in 
Cause No. C-1-PB-1 1-001608, 
pending in the Probate Court 
No. One, Travis County, 

Texas, to Susan Ersch 
Flusche. 

All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
to the undersigned within 
the time and in the 

manner prescribed by law, 
addressed as follows: 

Susan Ersch Flusche, Inde- 
pendent Executor 
Estate of Dayton C. Ersch, 
Deceased 

c/o: Kenneth A. Richey, Jr. 
Attorney at Law 
1910 Justin Lane 
Austin, Texas 78757 
DATED the 9th day of 
November, 2011. 

/s/ Kenneth A. Richey, Jr. 
Attorney for Susan Ersch 
Flusche 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters of Indepen- 
dent Administration for the 
Estate of Alton Marlin Redd, 
Deceased, were issued on 
November 8, 201 1 , in Cause 
No. C-1-PB-1 1-000684, pend- 
ing in the Probate Court No. 
One, Travis County, Texas, to: 
Alton Wayne Redd. 


All persons having claims 
against this Estate which is 
currently being administered 
are required to present them 
to the undersigned within 
the time and in the manner 
prescribed by law. 
c/o Guy F. Gebbia 
Attorney at Law 
1505 W. Koenig Lane 
Austin, TX 78756 
Dated the 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 2011. 

/s/ Guy F. Gebbia 
State Bar No.: 07786380 
Attorney for Alton Wayne 
Redd 

1505 W. Koenig Lane 
Austin, TX 78756 
Telephone: (512) 450-1422 
Facsimile: (512) 450-1799 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Notice is hereby given that 
original Letters Testamentary 
of the Estate of Darla W. 
Evans, Deceased, were 
issued on November 
10, 2011 in Cause No. 
C-1-PB-1 1-001596, pending 
in Travis County Probate 
Court Number One, Travis 
County, Texas to David Scott 
Kirkpatrick, Independent 
Executor. All persons having 
claims against said Estate 
are required to present them 
to Richard Thormann, At- 
torney at Law, 805 West 10th 
Street, Suite 100, Austin, 
Texas 78701 within the time 
prescribed by law. 


OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE 

TO BIDDERS 

TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed bids will be accepted 
by Travis County for the fol- 
lowing items: 

1 .Flat Tire and Tube Repair & 
Replacement, B120005-CW 
Opens: November 28, 201 1 @ 
10:00 a.m. 

2. Flexible Base Material, 

Type A, Grade 2, B120023-CW 
Opens: November 28, 201 1 @ 
10:00 a.m. 

Bids should be submitted to: 
Cyd Grimes, Travis County 
Purchasing Agent, 700 
Lavaca Street, Suite 800, 

RO. Box 1748, Austin, Texas 
78767. Specifications can be 
obtained from or viewed at 
the Travis County Purchasing 
Office at no charge or by 
downloading a copy from 
our website: www.co.travis. 
tx. us/purchasing/sol icita- 
tion.asp. Bidders should 
use unit pricing or lump 
sum pricing, if appropriate. 
Payments may be made by 
check. The successful bidder 
shall be required to furnish 
a Performance Bond in the 
amount of One Hundred 
percent (100%) of the 
contract amount awarded, if 
applicable. 


OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE 
TO PROPOSERS 
TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS 

Notice is hereby given that 
sealed proposals will be ac- 
cepted by Travis County for 
the following items: 

1 .External Video Security 
Cameras, P120025-GM 
Opens: November 30, 201 1 @ 
2:00 p.m. 

2. IT Assessment and 
CIO Transition Services, 

SI 10195-LC 


Opens: November 15, 2011 @ 
2:00 p.m. 

PROPOSAL OPENING 
DATE HAS BEEN EX- 
TENDED TO NOVEMBER 
29, 2011 @2:00 P.M. 

3. Professional Analysis of 
Impediments to Fair Housing 
Choice & Fair Housing Plan 
for Travis County, S1 1 0306- 
DW 

Opens: December 7, 201 1 @ 
3:00 p.m. 

AN OPTIONAL PRE- 
PROPOSAL CONFERENCE 
WILL BEHELD ON 
NOVEMBER 28, 2011 @ 
10:00 A.M. 

4. Mental Health Strategic 
Planning Services, SI 20021 - 
DW 

Opens: December 8, 201 1 @ 
3:00 p.m. 

Proposals should be submit- 
ted to: Cyd Grimes, Travis 
County Purchasing Agent, 
700 Lavaca Street, Suite 800, 
RO. Box 1748, Austin, Texas 
78767. Proposal Documents 
can be obtained from or 
viewed at the Travis County 
Purchasing Office at no 
charge or by downloading a 
copy from our website: www. 
co.travis.tx. us/purchasing/ 
solicitation. asp. Proposers 
should use unit pricing 
or lump sum pricing, if 
appropriate. Payments 
may be made by check. 

The successful proponent 
shall be required to furnish 
a Performance Bond in the 
amount of One Hundred 
percent (100%) of the 
contract amount awarded, if 
applicable. 

Scott Hillen, Partner, 
Larry Kille, Partner, 
DBA Sterling Events 
Hospitality, LTD is 
making an applica- 
tion with the Texas 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Commission for 
a MB, LB, on the 
address of 8611 N 
Mopac Expressway, 
Austin, Travis 
County, Texas. 

STOR SELF STORAGE 

In accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 
59 of the Texas Property 
Code, there being due and 
unpaid charges for which 
the undersigned is entitled 
to satisfy an owner’s lien 
of the goods hereinafter 
described and stored at 
Stor Self Storage locations 
listed below; And due notice 
having been given, to the 
owner of said property and 
all parties known to claim 
an interest therein, and the 
time specified in such notice 
for payment of such having 
disposed of on the following 
dates. No one under 16 al- 
lowed. Cash only! 

Stor Self Storage, 2508 W. 
Pecan St, Pflugerville, TX 
78660 512-990-1000 
December 06, 2011 12:30 
PM Anthony Alexander - 
Deep fryer, small microwave, 
2 side burners, counter top, 

2 round tables, sink, square 
folding table, plastic tub, 
wood pieces. 


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BUSINESS 


APPLIANCES 

AFFORDABLE APPLIANCES 
Refurbished Sales & Factory 
Authorized Service 
Washer & Dryer Sets starting 
at $230. 

All Appliances come with a 
FREE 13 Month Warranty 
512-581-0355 

Showroom located at 1500 W. 
Ben White Blvd. 


BUSINESS MY UNITED 

Web www.13535everymonth. 
com/system/tonybriones 
1.800.446.9060 ext 1539 


CLASSES/ 

INSTRUCTION 


AFRICAN DANCE WEST 
AFRICAN DANCE w/ Leida To- 
lentino Fun, high-energy class 
that emphasizes fluidity and 
grace in West African dance. 
All levels and drop-ins are 
welcome! Tuesdays 8:15-9:15 
pm Austin Dance Collective 
(www.austindancecollective. 
com) 2015 East Riverside Dr. 
$10-15 suggested donation 
Wear comfortable clothing 
and bring a bottle of water. 
Experience the energizing and 
healing power of traditional 
drum rhythms! 


COMPUTER TRAINING 

The Learning Pad 
provides training in 

•Allied Healthcare 
•Technology Certifications 
•Software Training 
Workshops 

Veteran & government grants 
available. Corporate & govern- 
ment pricing available. 

512-610-7600 


CONCEALED HANDGUN 
CLASS One Stop Shop 
Packets, Fingerprints, Photos, 
Notary, Range Fee, Certificate, 
Lunch! Inital Class $95 
centraltexasgunworks.com 


HARMONICA LESSONS 

Michael Rubin 

michaelrubinharmonica.com 

619-0761 


HULA CLASSES Learn the 
art of Polynesian Dance. Now 
offering Tahitian/Hawaian 
Dance, Hula & Drum classes 
at the Galaxy Dance Studios, 
1700 S Lamar. For kids and 
adults. Also teaching Tuesday 
nights at the Goddard School. 
Call Hula Halau Kaepa Dance 
Company to enroll. (512) 743- 
4568 tropicalevents.com 

ITALIAN Language Classes, 
one hour session, all levels: 
every Tuesday 6:30pm Begin- 
ners, 7:30pm Intermediate; 
every Thursday 6:30pm 
Advanced /Conversation, 
7:30pm Beg/Intermediate; 
every Saturday 10:00 Italian 
for Travelers. Taught by a na- 
tive. Elsa Gramola, A Taste of 
Italy In Austin. Italian Cooking 
Classes & Tours of Italy also. 
For information call (512) 
345-8941 elsa@atasteofitaly- 
inaustin.com 


MEDITATION Yoga and 
Spiritual Teachings. A school 
for spiritual growth. SchoolOf- 
SpiritualDevelopment.org 
888-472-0360 


CREATIVE/ 

DESIGN 


EXHIBITION Dragonfly 
Gallery at Rosedale presents: 
Hard Men and Wired Women 
Opening reception Nov.17. 
5:30p-7:30p More info Dragon- 
flygallerytx.com 


VIDEO AND AUDIO 

Pro-Tape.com. 

Media * Equipment * 
Supplies * Advice * 
Training * CD & DVD 
Duplication & Printing 
Video and Audio Rentals 
2055 S. Lamar 443-3911 


FINANCIAL 


DEBT CONSOLIDATION Do 

you worry about bills? Want a 
solution? For debt consolida- 
tion, Car loans, Business 
loans, please call 24 hr. toll 
free 1-800-708-9530 
Bad credit accepted 


GENERAL 


ADOPTION PREGNANT? 
CONSIDERING ADOPTION? 
Talk with caring agency 
specializing in matching 
Birthmothers with Families 
nationwide. LIVING EXPENS- 
ES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s 
One True Gift Adoptions 
866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) 
(AAN CAN) 


HEALTH/FITNESS 


FOOT THERAPY 

1 hour of foot therapy. 

only $35! Clean, Professional, 

Convenient. 

Call 512-833-9454. Walk in or 
by appointment. 

Located at Parmer and 135 
Address: 13000 N 135, building 
11, suite 101. 

www.footrelaxaustin.com 


KICKBOXING 

4 WEEKS FREE 
TRAINING FOR 
CANNED FOOD! 

Kids & Adult Kickboxing & 
MMA. kickboxing-austin.com 
or call 

512-821-3637 


LEE’S HERBS Chinese Herb- 
al Medicine. Tom Lee was a 
medical doctor and professor 
at Guangzhou University of 
Traditional Chinese Medicine 
in China for 28 years. Lee’s 
Herbs does Herb Consulta- 
tions, Wholesale and Retail 
of more than 400 All-Natural 
Herbs and Lee’s Herbs series 
supplements (Tom Lee’s own 
formulas). Also, many fine 
Chinese teas, gift items, and 
traditional Chinese painting. 
Free tea tastings available. 
13376 N.HWY 183, Suite 129 
512-250-8488 


YOGA/MASSAGE 

AUSTIN NATURAL 
MASSAGE & YOGA 

Private Hatha Yoga Sessions 
(Individual & Group) 
Massage Therapy 
(Table/Chair Available) 
Swedish/Deep-Tissue/Sports 
Trigger-Point/Energy/Rehab 
Call Gabriel (MT1 13914) 

512-348-9388 

No Calls After 10pm Please 
massageausti nyoga.com 


ZUMBA Party yourself into 
shape with Zumba Fitness 
Classes at Northwest Recre- 
ation Center, 2913 Northland 
Dr. First Class Free! Call Debra 
for info 512-698-7829. 


HOME 


AIR CONDITIONING 

Free Service Calls 
With or without repair 
Call Chez 24/7 @ 
512-363-2141. 

Find me on Facebook! 
TACL B27567E 
chezac.wordpress.com 


CARPENTRY REMODEL 

Jp Remodeling can do small 
carpentry jobs or complete 
home repairs and remodels. 
Working in Austin for over 25 
years. You can call me 293- 
4576 for a free estimate. 


FLOORING 

Frida’s Flooring 
Tile & Grout Specialists 
Call Now for a Free Estimate 
363-2141. 


HOUSE PAINTING Father 
and Son team. 30 years experi- 
ence. We match reasonable 
bids. www.FierroPainting.com 
512-259-7155 


HOUSEKEEPING Plus 
complete yard work & haul- 
ing trash. Call Tina or Luis 
512-243-3466 512-554-7198 


PAINTER Painting, texturing, 
sheetrock and carpentry 
repairs. Many references. Call 
dean @ 736-3326. 


PAINTING Insight Painting. 
Women owned & operated. 
Quality, conscientious work. 
References avail. 680-6681 


LABOR 

HANDYMAN 

Rent-A-Husband (an 
help you 
with Home 
Improvements 
for LESS!! 

•Interior/Exterior Painting 
•Interior/Exterior Repairs 
•Remodeling 
•Small Jobs 

Call for FREE estimate! 
(512) 258-0378 

TRANSMISSIONS 

JL Affordable Transmissions 
512-590-3741 
by appointment only 
jlaffordabletransmission.com 


LICENSED 
MASSAGE 

ALTERNATIVE 

Asian Sensations 
Massage Therapy. 

New in town. 

Near Braker & Lamar. 

LMT#MT045227 
In/Out Calls 945-9498 


ALTERNATIVE Esalen, 28 
years experience. Perfect 
relaxation massage. Private 
setting. Shower. Convenient 
location. $10 off. Janet, 
892-8877. LMT#2271. 


ALTERNATIVE Manly 
massage by Merlin Michael 
(LMT#21801) I ncal l/Outcal I 
512-636-4200. 


ALTERNATIVE White Tigress 
Massage with a Taoist, Tantric 
Priestess. For health, rejuvina- 
tion and pleasure. 

Arabella 512-701-1972 


ALTERNATIVE 

Therapist Trained 
In Pampering. 

M-Th 10-6 

30,60,90 min available. 
Jollyville Rd. 

Gisela 638-5768 LMT#19847 


ALTERNATIVE lmt#31534 

??DRAPING?? 

THATS FOR WINDOWS.. 

Call KAT 445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE 

SOOTHING... 

Long Trip, Long Flight 
Long Day? 

Stressed, Exhausted, Sore? 

(aiming 

Bath & Massage. 
ANNE 444-5985 

(LMT#13296) 


austinchronicle.com NOVEMBER 18, 2011 the Austin chronicle 101 



WILL ASTROLOGY 

by Rob Brezsny for Nov. 18-24 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In his poem “Ode to the Present,” Pablo Neruda tells us how to 
slip free and clear into the luxuriously potent opportunity of the present moment. The here and 
now is so ripe and willing, he says, so malleable. “Take a saw to its delicious/wooden/perfume, ” 
he continues, and then “build/a staircase! /Yes, a/staircase./Climb/into/the present, /step/ by 
step, /press your feet/onto the resinous wood/of this moment, /going up, /going up, /not very high 
... Don’t go all the way to heaven./ Reach/for apples, /not the clouds.” Such good advice for you, 
Scorpio! It’s a perfect time to learn more about the magic of the present moment as you free 
yourself from “the unrepairable past.” (Read the poem at bit.ly/nerudaode.) 

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DGC. 21): Seminal psychologist Carl Jung wasn’t afraid of applying his 
scholarly analytical skills to the phenomena of pop culture. Late in life, he even wrote a thoughtful 
book on UFOs called Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies. To be as thor- 
ough and careful as he could possibly be about such an elusive subject, he wrote an afterword to 
his main argument, to which he added an epilogue, which in turn was followed by a concluding 
supplement. I hope that you are as scrupulous in wrapping up loose ends in the coming week, 
Sagittarius, especially when you’re dealing with enigmas and riddles. As you seek resolution and 
completion, go well beyond the bare minimum. 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- Jan. 19): A great deal of land in the Netherlands has been reclaimed 
from the sea by human effort. But the system of dikes that holds back the primal flow is not a 
foolproof or permanent guarantee against flooding. That’s why more and more people are building 
homes that can float if they have to. “We are actually trying to move away from fighting against the 
water,” says architect Koen Olthuis.“We are beginning to make friends with the water.” I recommend 
you adopt this as a useful metaphor, Capricorn. During the coming months, you should be doing a 
lot of foundation work. What can you do to add buoyancy? 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to my old philosophy professor Norman 0. Brown, “Our 
real choice is between holy and unholy madness: open your eyes and look around you - madness 
is in the saddle anyhow.” Let’s take this hypothesis as our starting point, Aquarius. I propose that 
in the coming week you make an effort to get more accustomed to and comfortable with the un- 
derstanding that the entire world is in the throes of utter lunacy. Once you are at peace with that, I 
hope you will commit yourself to the sacred kind of lunacy - the kind that bestows wild blessings 
and perpetrates unreasonable beauty and cultivates the healing power of outlandish pleasure. 

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It won’t be enough to simply maintain your current levels of 
strength, clarity, and intelligence in the coming week. To stay healthy, to keep up with the rapidly 
evolving trends swirling in and around you, you will have to actively push to get stronger, clearer, 
and smarter. No pressure, right? Don’t worry, the universe will be conspiring to help you accom- 
plish it all. To trigger the boost you’ll need, imagine that you have a reservoir of blue, liquid lightning 
in the place between your heart and gut. Picture yourself drawing judiciously from that high-octane 
fuel as you need it, bringing it first to your heart and then to your brain. 

ARIES (March 21-April 19): If you go into a major art museum that displays Europe’s great oil 
paintings, you’ll find that virtually every masterpiece is surrounded by an ornate wooden frame, 
often painted gold. Why? To me, the enclosure is distracting and unnecessary. Why can’t I just enjoy 
the arresting composition on the naked canvas, unburdened by the overwrought excess? I urge you 
to take my approach in the coming week, Aries. Push and even fight to get the goodies exactly as 
they are, free of all the irrelevant filler, extraneous buffers, and pretentious puffery. 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Judge a moth by the beauty of its candle,” said 13th century poet 
Rumi. More prosaically put: Evaluate people according to the nobility and integrity of the desires 
they’re obsessed with. Do you want to hang around with someone whose primary focus is to make 
too much money or please her parents or build a shrine to his own ego? Or would you prefer to be 
in a sphere of influence created by a person who longs to make a useful product or help alleviate 
suffering or make interesting works of art? It’s an excellent time to ponder these issues, Taurus - 
and then take action to ensure you’re surrounded by moths that favor beautiful candles. 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Santa Cruz, Calif., there used to be a nightclub that featured live 
rock bands on a big stage but enforced a strict policy forbidding patrons to dance. The one time 
I went there, the music was loud and infectious, and I naturally felt the urge to move in vigorous 
rhythm. Moments after I launched into my groove, a bouncer accosted me and forced me to stop. 

I think this situation has certain resemblances to the one you’re in now, Gemini. Some natural 
response mechanism in you is being unduly inhibited; some organic inclination is being unreason- 
ably restrained or dampened. Why should you continue to accept this? 

CANCER (June 21-July 22): During the time a blue crab is growing to maturity, it is very skilled 
at transforming itself. It sheds its exoskeleton an average of once every 18 days for an entire year. 

You’re in a phase with some similarities to that period of rapid ripening, Cancerian. Your commit- 
ment to change doesn’t have to be quite as heroic, but it should be pretty vigorous. Could you 
manage, say, two moltings over the next 30 days? If done in a spirit of adventure, it will be liberat- 
ing, not oppressively demanding. 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Progress isn’t made by early risers,” wrote author Robert Heinlein. “It’s 
made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something.” That’s exactly the kind of progress 
you are in an excellent position to stir up in the coming week. You don’t have to match the stress 
levels of the type A people who might seem to have an advantage over you, and you won’t help 
yourself at all by worrying or trying too hard. The single best thing you can do to supercharge your 
creativity is to think of yourself as a happy-go-lucky person while you go around dreaming up ways 
to have more fun. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Our Elders know you don’t find the answer by asking thousands of ques- 
tions,” says an essay on the website of environmentalist group the Last Tree (www.thelasttree.net). 

“The wise way is to ask the right question in the beginning.” I recommend this approach for you in 
the coming week, Virgo. Given the sparkly mysteriousness that now confronts you, I know you may be 
tempted to simultaneously try a lot of different routes to greater clarity. But the more effective strategy 
in the long run is to cultivate silence and stillness as you wait expectantly for the intuition that will reveal 
the simple, direct path. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In a review of James Gleick’s book The Information: A History, a 
Theory, a Flood, The Week magazine reported that “the world now produces more information in 
48 hours than it did throughout all human history to 2003.” From that dizzying factoid, we can 
infer that you are more inundated with data than were all of your ancestors put together. And the 
surge will probably intensify in the coming week. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when 
you’ll be asked to absorb and integrate a voluminous amount of interesting stuff. Don’t be hard on 
yourself if you sometimes need to slow down to digest what you’ve been taking in. 

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s 
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. 

The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 877/873-4888 or 900 / 950 - 7700 . 

102 THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 18, 2011 austinchronicle.com 


LICENSED 
MASSAGE <ont. 

ALTERNATIVE Massage 
Therapy for the health con- 
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(512) 826-0022. (MT 023335) 


ALTERNATIVE LMT 31534 

* BEAT THE HEAT* 
Cool Candlelight Massage 
Kathleen 445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE LMT 31534 
Massages are like a box of 
chocolates.. ..ya never know. 
Kathleen 445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE 

PMQ MASSAGE 

Body Scrubs/ 
Massage/Reiki 
North Austin 
Paulmarq (LMT 31549) 

( 512 ) 522-7671 

www.pmqmassage.com 


ALTERNATIVE Lmt 31534 
“"ROSE PETAL MASSAGE”” 
Velvety/Cool/Crisp Petals/ 
Soft lights/Dream Music 
445-0280. 


ALTERNATIVE Massage & 
Esthetic Services by Friendly, 
Open-Minded Male LMT/ 
Esthetician, 1 Man Operation! 
FOR MEN & WOMEN. Offer- 
ing Swedish and deep tissue 
Massage. Offering Waxing/ 
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For more information, a list of 
FAQ’s and a detailed pricelist 
and other services, check 
out my website at www. 
spaboyblu.com or call me at 
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in/out call services. Super 
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LMT#1 05875 


ALTERNATIVE A Great Mas- 
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9am-10pm, 7 days/week. (512) 
296-4111. 


ALTERNATIVE lmt#31534 
Eliminate: Fybromyalgia/ 
Carpal Tunnel/TMJ 
Call “DR” Kat 445-0280 


ALTERNATIVE 

NOW OPEN! Improve cir- 
culation, Remove Soreness, 
Reduce Stress with Deep 
Tissue, Accupressure, Table 
Shower, and Foot Massage. 
Lily’s Massage 11139 N IH35 
(SE corner of 135/Braker) 
512-973-3150 
ME#1869 


ALTERNATIVE 11 740 

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Appts $65/hr Call to book 
297-3790 LMT#016636 


ALTERNATIVE Massage 
by Vicki. Facials, Manscap- 
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(MT#6673) Call 512-797-5103 


DEEP TISSUE 
MAGICPALMS 

7607 Blessing Ave., 
Austin, TX 78752 
Near St. Johns and Cameron 
SATURDAY SPECIAL $50/hr 
Se habla Espanol 
$40/50 min Mon. Tues. Thurs. 
$1 0 off with previous day 
appointment. 

(One discount only) 

Late Night outcalls Fri. & Sat. 
Up early Tues. and Sat. 
Please call before 7 PM 
Outcalls: Noon - late night 
$75 for 75 minutes. 
Incalls: $65 for 75 minutes. 
Types of massage: Swedish, 
deep tissue, sentuous, 
relaxation. Shorter massages 
available. Relieve stress, 
soreness, back/neck pain or 
just relax and enjoy. 
281-6274 

281-MASH (Massage Away 
Stress Headaches) 

LMT #45388 


DEEP TISSUE/SWEDISH 

Initial 1-1/2 hr $65 
Nina Powers LMT#8574 
15 yrs exp, 708-1970 
bodyharmonymassage.com 


GENERAL 

A JOURNEY 
BEYOND 
SENSATIONS... 

by Mary Ellen. The ultimate 
experience in relaxation! 

• Full Body Massage 

• Herbal Baths • Warm Oils 

• Hot Tub Massage 

• Luxury Outcall Available 
MC/VISA (RMT#9644) 

927-8366 


GENERAL 

AWESOME TOUCH 
MASSAGE 

Professional, relaxing 
and healing massage. 
Heated table, mature clients 
preferred. 

Returning military vets 
discount 
BACK IN TOWN!! 
www.awesometouch.com 
LMT#2474 

Call Sandy (512) 656-5445 

GENERAL PEACE & RUB 
Massage Revolution. 827 W. 
12th @ Lamar, Call (512) 799- 
3131 Julianne 
No Calls After 9PM 
(LMT1 07693) or visit 
rublove.massagetherapy.com 


GENERAL SOOTHING 
MASSAGE. Swedish, Deep 
Relaxation, Amazing Touch, 
Full Body Massage, 
Acupressure. By 
Appointment ONLY. 258-1592 
In Call North Austin on Jol- 
lyville Road LMT 042276 

GENERAL* PAMPER 
YOURSELF! * The Executive 
Touch Massage. Specializing 
in Total Relaxation. Call Kim 
828-2151, LMT023154 


GENERAL 

GIFT YOURSELF 

To a luxurious deep-tissue 
Swedish massage from a very 
empathetic therapist. Located 
East Central/University area. 
Kasey Smith, LMT#17406. 

457-8496 


GENERAL Treat yourself to 
a relaxing hot oil, full-body 
Swedish massage in a 
candle-lit, private room/ 
shower, 24/7, in/out calls. 
Clint 775-9164- LMT# 34842 


LICENSED MASSAGE 

Theraputic relief. Inut calls. 
9am to 7pm daily. Call Eva 
512-282-4426. lmt# 3830 


MEDICAL 

ED PELVIC 
MASSAGE 

Warm relaxing shower 
before massage. Same day 
appointments available. 
Call Anne (LMT#39649) 

512 - 653-3438 


RELAXATION Massage by 
male therapist. Call Greg for 
soothing, deep tissue 
massage. In/Out calls. LMT# 
22435. Cell 512-496-3527. 


RELAXATION 

Full Body Massage for the 
discriminating man. Soothing 
techniques to remedy your 
needs. Weekdays 5PM- 
9PM, Wkends/Holidays 
10AM-9PM. Near Zilker Park 
LMT#032673. Don 970-1131 


RELAXATION 

The most natural, pure and 
healing thing in the world 
is a caring touch. Full body 
massage treatment 
WELL BODY SPA 111 W. WIL- 
LIAM CANNON DR. 
512-912-0999 
MT 102510 


SUPPLIES 

GREAT SELECTION OF 
MASSAGE TABLES AND 
CHAIRS FROM $189 

Austin’s Largest Inventory 
of Massage & Aromatherapy 
Supplies 

• Licensed Massage 
• Facials, Waxing 

• Oils, Candles, Gifts 

(ME#0889) 

1919 S 1st St 
512-476-1727 



THERAPEUTIC Reduce pain 
and stress. Best professional 
therapeutic massage to 
relieve, relax, and revitalize. 
Easy access from North & 
Central Austin. 

Great Rates! 

789-6278, 

Nanette, LMT017147 

THERAPEUTIC 

CHINESE 

PRESSURE POINT 
MASSAGE 

Deep Tissue & Soothing Style 
Massage 

Facial and Waxing Services 
10 Years experience in the 
Same South West 
Austin Location 

PHONE (512 656-2054 
Pao Chuan (Bonnie) 

LMT#23296 


PSYCHIC/ 
ASTROLOGY 

BODY AND SOUL “Thou- 
sands of women standing on 
a cliff throwing little pickles 
at you? Why am I the only 
one that has that dream?” 
Find a psychic in The Austin 
Chronicle’s Body & Soul 
Section. 


TAROT READINGS Austin 
Unique. Clear answers/new 
insights. Donations only (512) 
569-4767. 


TRAVEL 


VACATIONS 

ITALY TOURS 

• New Year’s in Sicily 

Dec 26-Jan 4 
• Spring Break in Rome, 
Florence & Venice Mar 10-18 

• Rome, Amalfi Coast, 
Pompeii, Capri Island 

Jun 14-23 

Call Elsa Gramola for more 
dates and destinations! 

( 512 ) 345-8941 

ATasteOfltalylnAustin.com 


MISCELLANEOUS 


PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD 

for accuracy the first time it 
runs. The Austin Chronicle 
is not responsible for copy 
errors after the first week 
of publication. The Austin 
Chronicle’s liability for errors 
is limited to the cost of the 
space occuped by the error, 
with a maximum liability of 
republication. Corrections 
must be submitted by Tues- 
day, 1pm. 

PERSONALS LiveMatch. 
com Personal Ads, Chat Line 
& Forums Basic Membership 
is FREE! FREE local phone 
number for Austin, Texas! 
(512) 279-3303 


Out 

What The Buzz Is About. 



The Austin Chronicle offices 
will be closed Nov. 24th 
and 25th. 

Deadline for the Nov. 25 
issue is next Monday, 

Nov. 21st at 5pm. 






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Ask about Military & 

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O Planned Parenthood® 

For smart answers to all your questions 
about sex, birth control, STDs, pregnancy, 
and HIV. Confidential sexual health 
services for men and women of all 
ages and income levels. 

CALL: 800.230.PLAN 


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Design For Energy 

Feng Shui your way to success 
For Business, Home & Real Estate Needs 

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READY TO QUIT SMOKING? 

HypnosisAustin.com 512-200-4249 


MAGICIAN'S ASSISTANT 

Travel Required. Contact Dream Catcher 
Magic 512-689-5851. 
No experience required. 

BOMBSHELL BEAUTY 

326-2929 

Waxing for Women Only 
bombshellbeautyaustin.com 

LEARN TO DANCE! 

Newcomer Night 
Beginning EC Swing & Blues 
Friday, November 18th, 7:30-1 0:30pm 
www.GoDanceStudio.com 


PEACE & RUB MASSAGE 

Deep Therapeutic Massage 
Swedish Relaxation • Ashiatsu 
rublove.massagetherapy.com 
512-799-3131 LMT 107693 


QUACK'S 43RD St BAKERY 

THANKSGIVING DAY HOURS 7AM - 3PM 
Order pies through Sunday 11/20 
453-3399 • quacksbakery.com 


COME AND GET 'EM! 

Free (used) Padded Mailing Envelopes 
Great for Promo, Marketing, Hoarding 
Chronicle Office: 4000 N IH35, 78751 


PUNK -ROCK -GOTH 

Clothing, Tshirts, Patches, Stickers, Pins 
New/Used secretoktober.com 1905 S. 1st. 


ADDICTED TO PAIN MEDS? 

Suboxone Detox / Maintenance 
(512) 474-5904 www.poppswebsite.com 


BOOKS 

Thought about selling your books online? Forget 
the listing, packing, the shipping, the long wait, 
and the hassle of online by selling your books 
locally and conveniently at BookHolders in 
Austin. BookHolders.com buys novels, paper- 
backs, older, international or custom editions for 
money, not credit. Visit our store on the Ground 
Level of Dobie Mall at 2025 Guadalupe. 


DIY CONSULTANTS 

We’ll see you through your home 
improvement project start to finish. 
51 2-222-91 1 9 www.diyconsultant.net 
diyadvisor@gmail.com 


STRUM MUSIC SCHOOL 

Guitar, Bass, Drums, & Piano Lessons 
Experienced Teachers. Fun & Relaxed 
Environment. 3316 Bee Caves Rd. 
StrumAustin.com 512-328-5878 


ASTROFISH.NET 

Horoscopes, Readings, Books 


AWESOME TOUCH MASSAGE 

Professional, relaxing, and healing mas- 
sage. Heated table, mature clients 
preferred Call Sandy 512-656-5445 LMT 
#2474 www.awesometouch.com 


KICKBOXING-AUSTIN.COM 

4 Weeks FREE TRAINING for 
Canned Food! 512-821-3637 

HOLIDAY PARTIES? 

Whether it’s formal, dressy or costumed, 
we have it! Sizes XS-5X. 
1810 W. Anderson Ln. 836-8768 
venusenvyconsignments.com 


MOTORBLADE.COM 

Fritz the poster dude puts fliers 
in 200 legal spots $60/wk • 554-4034 


SEMEN DONORS NEEDED 

$150 per specimen. Healthy college 
educated males, 18-39 years old. For an 
application visit 123donate.com 

MASSAGE TABLE SALE! 
CHAIR ONLY $189! 

MORNING STAR TRADING COMPANY 

1919 S. First 476-1727 
www.morningstarcompany.com 

STICKERS, LABELS, DECALS 

We’ll help you get it right! 
TheBumperSticker.com 51 2-873-9626 

RUA4CL0SER BUYER? 

I have homes available! Call me now! 
Joseph Aubin 512-563-7093 

SEX ADDICTS ANONYMOUS 

Info/ Meeting Directions: 
www.saa-austin.org 
Anonymous Hotline: 512-370-9571 

WILD LOCAL SINGLES 

REPLY TO ADS FREE! 

(512) 457-1900 Straight 
(512) 480-8400 Gay & Bi 
Use FREE Code 7683, 18+ 


REHEARSAL ROOMS 

24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 
Play as loud as you want, when you want. 
Monthly lock-outs. Kirk 512-663-2808 

CANCER/STROKE 

& HEART ATTACK INSURANCE 

Reasonable rates for qualified. 

(512) 587-8528 

WHITE TIGRESS MASSAGE 

FOR HEALTH AND REJUVENATION 

Arabella 51 2-701 -1 972 LMT1 1 3227 


** MIDTOWNE SPA ** 

A PRIVATE MEN'S HEALTH CLUB 

5815 Airport Blvd. • 302-9696 
Gay. Bi. Curious 
1/2 off: M/W-Room - T/Th- Locker 
Free-Student Tues / Thurs Military Fri 

PMQ MASSAGE 

Intuitive Massage * Natural Body Care 
$15 OFF FALL SPECIAL! 512-522-7671 
pmqmassage.com MT31549 

$10 HOOKAH! 65 VARIETIES! 

Off The Hookah Coffe Shop-Lounge, Food/ 
BYOB! 2621 Jones@Westgate 891-0493 


LASER HAIR REMOVAL 

Underarms $49/Session 
Bikini $59/Session 
Brazilian $69/Session 
www.AustinLaserClinic.com 
(512) 447-SKIN 

CONCEALED GUN CLASS 

centraltexasgunworks.com 51 2-731 -3585 

CALL CONDO JOE 

Joe Bryson, Realtor 
Two time Best of Austin winner 
(512) 203-4100 
www.CondoJoe.com 

STATE INSPECTOR 

Vehicle and motorcycle inspections 
November 19th, “Hell with Emissions” 
Open car show from 2-4pm 
$250 cash prize for peoples choice. 
9433 Parkfield Drive, 78758 
www.austininspector.com 

WHETSTONE AUDIO 

The Best Little Hi-Fi Shop In Texas! 
Rega, Devore, Naim, Harbeth, Zu, 
Grado + Lots more! 
477-8503 whetstoneaudio.com 
2401 E. 6th #1001 

MANSCAPING! 

Full Body Waxing & More For Men! 
512-363-8331 themanscaper.com 
COS# 1412161 

SAME DAY RAY 

For Rent & Sale 
Houses, Duplexes, Apts 
Blue Water Realty 
(512) 496-3725 

AUSTIN CREATIVE MEDIA 

Press kits, Branding, Promotion, 
Web Design, Social Media, Marketing 
51 2-804-61 74 austincreativemedia.com 


HANDCRAFTED JEWELRY 

SILVER-GEMS-GLASS-RECYCLED 

Local Artisan and Fair Trade 374-1 1 52 
Accents & Elements 5925 Burnet Rd 



Besttix.com 458-9700 


GHOSTLAND OBSERVATORY 
TUNA CHRISTMAS 
TORI AMOS • WICKED 
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ROGER WATERS* THE NATIONAL 
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DiabloRojoStudio.com 
UT 476-7575 S. Lamar 444-7656 

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SUBimiT WORK 

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